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Agenda

Ordinary Council Meeting

17 May 2021

The meeting commences at 6.30pm. If members of the public are

not interested in any business recommended to be considered in

Closed Session or there is no such business, Council will ordinarily

  commence consideration of all other business at 7pm.

 

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Notice of Meeting

 

Dear Councillors

 

Notice is given of the Ordinary Council Meeting, to be held in the Council Chambers on Monday 17 May 2021 commencing at 7pm. The business to be transacted at the meeting is included in this business paper.

 

Yours faithfully

Craig - GM

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

 

Council Meeting Procedures

 

The Council meeting is chaired by the Mayor, Councillor Pam Palmer. Councillors are entitled to one vote on a matter. If votes are equal, the Chairperson has a second or casting vote. When a majority of Councillors vote in favour of a Motion it becomes a decision of the Council. Minutes of Council and Committee meetings are published on Council’s website www.lanecove.nsw.gov.au by 5pm on the Thursday following the meeting.

 

Meetings are conducted in accordance with Council's Code of Meeting Practice. The order of business is listed in the Agenda’s Table of Contents.  The order of the Agenda will be followed unless Council resolves to change the order at the meeting. For example, where members of the public may be interested in a specific Agenda item.

 

Please note that the Public Gallery will be open to a maximum of 30 people in accordance with current NSW Government directives and in the interests of public health. 

 

The Public Forum will hear registered speakers from the Public Gallery as well as online using the web platform Zoom.  Please note all Public Forum participants must be registered to speak using the online form, no later than midnight on the day prior to the meeting (i.e. Sunday 16 May 2021).  Online speakers will receive a Zoom meeting link by email on the day of the meeting.  A time limit of three minutes applies to all speakers in the Public Forum.

 

Members of the public can also submit a written address via email to service@lanecove.nsw.gov.au. Written addresses will be circulated to Councillors, shall be a maximum of 500 words and be received by Council no later than midnight, on the day prior to the meeting.

 

If you have any queiries regarding the the information given above; require assistance to participate in the meeting due to a disability; or wish to obtain information in relation to Council, please contact Council’s Executive Manager – Corporate Services on (02) 9911 3550.

 

Please note meetings held in the Council Chambers are recorded on tape for the purposes of verifying the accuracy of minutes and the tapes are not disclosed to any third party under the Government Information (Public Access)  Act 2009, except as allowed under section 18(1) or section 19(1) of the PPIP Act, or where Council is compelled to do so by court order, warrant or subpoena or by any other legislation.


Ordinary Council 17 May 2021

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

APOLOGIES

 

OPENING OF MEETING WITH PRAYER

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT TO COUNTRY

 

NOTICE OF WEBCASTING OF MEETING

 

MATTERS RECOMMENDED BY THE GENERAL MANAGER TO BE CONSIDERED IN CLOSED COMMITTEE

 

public forum

 

Members of the public may address the Council Meeting on any issue for 3 minutes.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

 

1.      ORDINARY COUNCIL MEETING - 19 APRIL 2021

 

Mayoral Minutes

 

2.       Mayoral Minute - Cockatoo Island

 

Orders Of The Day

 

Notices of Motion

 

3.       Notice of Motion - Tenure of Council Committee Members

 

Officer Reports for Determination

 

4.       Bob Campbell Oval - Update

 

5.       St Leonards Over Rail Plaza Project - Design and Naming

 

6.       Local Housing Strategy - Public Exhibition

 

7.       Mental Health Services in Lane Cove

 

8.       Building Upgrade Finance - Environmental Upgrade Agreement

 

9.       Traffic Committee - April 2021

 

10.     Local Government Remuneration Tribunal Annual Report and Determination - Councillor Fees

 

11.     Third Quarter Review - 2020/21 Budget

 

12.     Third Quarter Review  - Delivery Program and Operational Plan 2020 - 21

 

13.     Council Snapshot April 2021

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 May 2021

Mayoral Minute - Cockatoo Island

 

 

Subject:          Mayoral Minute - Cockatoo Island    

Record No:    SU7553 - 27041/21

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):      Councillor Pam Palmer 

 

 

Executive Summary

                                                              

This Minute supports a recommendation that Council make a submission regarding the Draft Concept Vision for Cockatoo Island to the Sydney Harbour Federation Trust.

 

Background

 

The Sydney Harbour Federation Trust is providing an opportunity for the community to provide feedback on proposed initiatives detailed in the Draft Concept Vision for Cockatoo Island (at AT-1).

 

Further information is available on the Sydney Harbour Federation Trust website

 

The current consultation period commenced on 4 May 2021 and will close on 11 June 2021. 

 

Discussion

 

The aim of the consultation is to help determine the best way to celebrate the island’s history and open it up for more people to enjoy, including the places, facilities, partnerships and program needed to make this possible.”

 

Council staff are attending a briefing next week and will then be in a position to comment on the Draft Concept Vision.

 

I have received representations from the community concerned about the future of Cockatoo Island, particularly given more events and ‘additional accommodation’ are being contemplated.

 

Development of the site affects vistas of Sydney Harbour, may have noise impacts for Lane Cove residents and affects the heritage value of this important precinct.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council make a submission on the Draft Concept Vision for Cockatoo Island.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor Pam Palmer

Mayor

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Draft Concept Vision for Cockatoo Island

61 Pages

Available Electronically

  


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 May 2021

Notice of Motion - Tenure of Council Committee Members

 

 

Subject:          Notice of Motion - Tenure of Council Committee Members    

Record No:    SU827 - 26866/21

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):      Councillor Pam Palmer 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The current Council term ends in September this year.  This would be an appropriate time to review good governance practices for the new Council Committees.  It is recommended that one such good practice is introduced for Council committees, namely to limit the tenure for committee members.

 

Discussion

 

In both the corporate and not-for-profit sectors, good governance advises that boards should consider how a director’s tenure may impact their performance, particularly if serving for ten years or longer.

 

While such directors are generally appointed for a fixed term, an organisation’s governing documents will generally set out requirements about how long a director is appointed for, whether they can be reappointed and, if so, whether there is a limit to the number of terms (or years) that a person can serve as a director.

 

A director’s tenure may be limited to encourage renewal.  Although there may be good reason for a director to serve for an extended period in certain circumstances, there are many benefits to bringing fresh perspectives onto a board.

 

In line with leading practice recommendations, many such organisations are now adopting a limit of 9-10 years for a director to serve on the board and use a constitutionally mandated limit to ensure director renewal. 

 

Likewise for Council, good governance principles would suggest that we introduce limits to the terms for committee members.  Given that 9-10 years is generally used as a tenure benchmark, a practical and appropriate limit for Council would be two Council terms (8-9 years).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council limit membership of Council Committees to a tenure of two (2) consecutive Council terms, noting that:-

 

a)   The limit be applied to committees such as Advisory Committees but not to committees of which all Councillors are members or of which all Councillors of a particular Ward are prescribed to be members;

 

b)   the limit applies to both community members and Councillor members of the committee; and.

c)   should at any time the term limitation result in 100% of the members being ineligible for reappointment, Council use its discretion to allow up to 50% of ineligible members to continue for one Council term to provide continuity on the Committee.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor Pam Palmer

Mayor

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 May 2021

Bob Campbell Oval - Update

 

 

Subject:          Bob Campbell Oval - Update    

Record No:    SU5606 - 26222/21

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Martin Terescenko 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council adopted the Bob Campbell Master Plan in November 2020. Since that time, consistent with the commitments given, Council staff have continued to undertake research to ensure the project incorporates best practice design and materials for sustainability, the environment and the end user.

 

Council’s research on the latest International best practice in relation to artificial turf design has identified the opportunity to eliminate the migration of micro plastics into the environment. The EU’s European Committee for Standardisation have developed a standard for synthetic surfaces, “Surfaces for sports areas. Synthetic turf sports facilities. Guidance on how to minimize infill dispersion into the environment”. While previous generations of synthetic turf can meet this standard, new 4G synthetic turf systems do not require performance infills, which have typically been made of crumbed black rubber, elastomer polymer granules. 4G synthetic turf systems can exceed the standard by removing performance infill all together. The absence of these infills removes the possibility of these micro plastics migrating into the environment.

 

While there are examples of these fields in Europe, and trials on small areas in Australia, use of a 4G system in the Bob Campbell Oval project would be Australia’s first 4G synthetic field with no performance infill, making it the most environmentally sensitive synthetic field in Australia.

 

Furthermore, the new synthetic surfaces are typically a fully woven product made of one polymer family. This makes it easier to recycle the synthetic surface at the end of its life as there is no requirement to separate the synthetic fibres from the glue and backing material. Fully woven turf also produces a product with superior tuft lock and filament bind than traditional tufted grass significantly reducing the likelihood of lost fibres migrating into the environment.

 

This is a significant step forward in environmental performance and the new system will be tested and analysed to provide information to industry to enable a faster take up of this new technology. Council will also be working with industry and universities to identify best end of life options for recycling of the product.

 

The NSW Government is currently undertaking a review on the use of synthetic turf surfaces for sports fields.  Council will be participating in the review and is committed to complying with the outcomes. To avoid project delays, in the interim, Council will continue with the procurement process for the new non-infill synthetic turf system, with a contractual right to amend the specification to comply with the review’s outcomes or terminate the contract if required. It is recommended the report be received and noted and Council formally commit to complying with the Review’s outcomes.

 

Background

 

Council at its meeting of 16 November 2021 resolved that:-

1.   Council receive and endorse the revised Bob Campbell Oval Master Plan, AT- 9;  

2.   Upgrades be undertaken to the bush tracks leading to the oval (from River Rd and from Ford St) including better pedestrian access through the culvert below River Rd - funded either through the NSW Precinct Support Scheme Grant or the NSW Public Spaces Legacy Program Grant;

3.   Council write to DPIE seeking agreement to the change to the conditions of the Precinct Support Scheme Grant to delay commencement of the project due to:

(a)  continuing major works being undertaken by Sydney Water at the site; 

(b)  timing constraints in preparing for and staging the Greenwich Village Games; and;

4.   The head petitioners be notified. 

 

Council at its meeting of 15 February 2021 resolved: -

 

“That Council provide to the community via the Council website, as and when they become available, the design detail for the Bob Campbell Oval Master Plan and all technical and environmental reports (including the Review of Environmental Factors) relating to the project.”

 

Council at its meeting of 15 March 2021 resolved, that Council:-

“1.  Reaffirms its resolution to provide the community with access to all Council’s plans, studies and reports in relation to implementation of the Bob Campbell Master Plan;

2.   Write to Minister Stokes regarding our intentions and offer to provide him with the same information (as noted above); and

3.    Acknowledge, in response to Council’s resolution of December 2020, that Council has been in discussions with Dr Battam regarding our options for an improved turf surface at Bob Campbell Oval.”

 

Council at its meeting of 19 April 2021, received and noted a Mayoral Minute which identified the following steps in implementation of the Master Plan:-

 

1.   “Refine the design according to best environmental practice;

2.   Finalise the design and all supporting documents;

3.   Finalise the REF;

4.   Publish all documents; and

5.   If synthetic turf supported, proceed to tender.”

Consistent with Council’s resolutions and the commitments given, Council staff have continued to undertake research to ensure the project incorporates best practice design and materials for sustainability, the environment and the end user.

 

This report outlines progress to date, however other than the topographic survey, no documents have been finalised for inclusion on Council’s website.

 

Discussion

 

Synthetic Turf Research

 

A key issue which Council sought to address was to improve the environmental performance of the synthetic turf component of the project. International best practice in relation to artificial turf design has focused on eliminating the migration of micro plastics into the environment from the fields. The EU’s European Committee for Standardisation have developed a standard for synthetic surfaces – “Surfaces for sports areas. Synthetic turf sports facilities. Guidance on how to minimize infill dispersion into the environment”. While previous generations of synthetic turf can meet this standard utilising a variety of design features such as kerbs and scrubbers to contain the loose infill, new 4G synthetic surfaces exceed the requirements of this standard as they have no performance infill or NF (no-fill surfaces). A similar standard is soon to be ratified in Australia.

 

The performance infills in traditional synthetic sports fields are typically made of crumbed black rubber (SBR), elastomer polymer granules (TPE or EPDM) or natural infills like crumbed cork or coconut husk derivatives. The absence of these infills removes the possibility of these micro plastics migrating into the environment. This new synthetic surface also produces less heat island effect than crumbed black rubber infill turf fields.

 

Synthetic Surface with Performance Infill

Synthetic Surface with no Performance Infill

 

 

Council’s research has identified suppliers that have developed products to respond to this standard to address migration of microplastics from the fields. These products have reached a maturity where they can be used and are now available from multiple suppliers in Australia.

 

This product has been tested in Europe and the Dutch Premier League Football (soccer) team, PSV Eindhoven have constructed a training field with this system for research and development. The system is being used in Switzerland, Scandinavia and the Netherlands. Small trials have been undertaken in Australia, however Bob Campbell Oval would be Australia’s first 4G synthetic field with no performance infill.

 

In addition to not having any performance infill Council has also found a product that is fully woven. Most synthetic surfaces are made of synthetic grass fibres stitched into a backing material and bonded using either latex or polyurethane. The new fully woven product is made from one polymer family (polyolefin). The woven nature of the turf results in the grass fibres and backing structure being produced as one combined woven product. Being made up of one type of plastic makes it easier to recycle the synthetic surface at the end of its life. Traditionally backed synthetic turf systems require the removal of the infill material then separation of the glue and backing material before the products can be recycled.

 

Laboratory Testing of the woven non-infill turf using the standard Carpet Tuft Withdrawal test method shows results of 90N for unaged turf and 86N for water aged turf compared with the typical results for latex and polyurethane backed carpet being 45N and 65N respectively. This produces a product with superior tuft lock and filament bind than traditional tufted grass significantly reducing the likelihood of lost fibres migrating into the environment.

 

Furthermore, Council will be working with industry and universities to develop end of life opportunities for the recycled product. Some of the industry’s leading turf manufacturers have already developed products that use vast quantities of plastic waste including end of life turf. While universities can assist in developing new products with the recycled turf e.g. building materials.

 

This is a significant step forward in environmental performance and the new system will be tested and analysed to provide information to the industry to enable a faster take up of this new technology.

 

Design Evolution

 

The original playing field included a number of features which were based on using performance infill turf. With the new generation of turf it allows for more flexibility in the field configuration. This has allowed the removal of the 200mm concrete kerb and set down around the perimeter of the field as this feature was required to help manage the infill material. The removal of this kerb allows for a totally level transition onto the field from the surrounding areas. The addition of the removable fence panels allows for one continuous open field area with no obstacles. This particular feature will assist the running of the Greenwich Games as the organising committee and the community had some concerns with having to step in and out of the field when the surrounding fence was removed.

 

NSW Government Review of Synthetic Turf Sports Fields

 

The NSW Government is currently undertaking a review on the use of synthetic turf surfaces for sports fields. Council will be participating in the review and is providing all the research it has undertaken for consideration. Ultimately, it is appropriate that Council commit to complying with the review’s outcomes. In the interim, to avoid project delays, subject to the outcome of the REF, Council would continue with the procurement process for the project specifying a 4G non-infill synthetic turf system. The specification and contract documentation would include a contractual right to amend the specification for the synthetic turf system or terminate the contract completely, if required, to comply with the review’s outcomes.

 

Next Steps

 

The next steps for the implementation of the Master Plan are:-

 

1.   Finalise the design by incorporating the 4G non-infill synthetic turf system into the design and all supporting documents;

2.   Finalise the REF;

3.   Publish all documents;

4.   If synthetic turf is supported, proceed to tender, with documents to include a contractual right to amend the specification for the synthetic turf system to comply with the review’s outcomes or terminate the contract completely, if required; and

5.   Complete tender process, with works to commence post the 2021 Greenwich Games.

Conclusion

 

Council is committed to providing a best practice solution for all aspects of the Bob Campbell Oval Master Plan and delivering the project to the proposed timeframes. With the use of 4G synthetic turf systems; by participating in the NSW Government’s review of synthetic sports fields and including contractual rights to amend the specifications or cancel the contract, Council is ensuring that it can deliver the upgrade to Bob Campbell Oval on time with a superior environmental and sustainable outcome while being able to incorporate any changes that may be required as a result of the synthetic sports field review.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council:

1.    report be received and noted;

 

2.    Council commit to complying with the outcomes NSW Government’s Review of Synthetic Turf Sports Fields; and

 

3.    The procurement process for the Bob Campbell Oval Project include in the specification and contract documentation a contractual right to amend the specification for any synthetic turf system or terminate the contract completely, if required, to comply with the Review’s outcomes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Terescenko

Executive Manager - Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 May 2021

St Leonards Over Rail Plaza Project - Design and Naming

 

 

Subject:          St Leonards Over Rail Plaza Project - Design and Naming    

Record No:    SU7134 - 25916/21

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):      Sebastian Stivala 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The proposed St Leonards Plaza seeks to create a green space in the heart of the St Leonards CBD in line with the NSW Government’s new strategic approach in Planned Precincts to focus on people, places, public spaces and the environment. This project will meet the open space demands for workers and urban growth, by providing public open space that is accessible, active and vibrant. This new urban landscape, built above the railway corridor, has been designed to connect with St Leonard’s Rail Station, new commercial and retail shopping spaces and is part of a pedestrian link through to the Crows Nest Metro, separated from the Pacific Highway.

 

The project commenced in 2011 and Council has worked closely with stakeholders during this time to arrive at the proposed design. The development has two primary elements being the structure itself and the installation of the landscaping and park elements onto the plaza. This report outlines the proposed design, timeline and a process for naming of the project and recommends that community consultation be undertaken with a further report being received by Council following the consultation period.

 

Background

 

Council has been pursuing delivery of this project since 2011 when the TfNSW expressed interest in the proposal. As reported in the Mayoral Minute to the April 2021 Council meeting, staff have noticed that significant resources have now been committed by Sydney Trains and DPIE to the project with significant progress being achieved, including a clear approval pathway being established for the structure and a Project Delivery Agreement being produced for Council’s consideration.

The project is fully funded, and it is a key element of the implementation of the St Leonards and Crows Nest 2036 Plan and, Councils own strategic plan and, is in keeping with the commitments of Voluntary Planning Agreements with neighbouring developments. 

 

Discussion

 

Design

 

This new public open space will have significant social and economic benefits by activating the precinct, improving connectivity and access, improving commuter safety and convenience, and providing much needed public open space in this part of St Leonards that compliments the new St Leonards Library and surrounding developments.

 

The proposed structure spanning the rail corridor provides a platform for much needed public open space, covering an area of 4,750 sqm approx., which is seamlessly connected to the JQZ, 88 Christie Street  development, which also provides public toilets and a 300 space public basement car park.

 

There are also plans to upgrade the existing Pacific Hwy pedestrian underpass with the addition of an elevator for direct access the new Plaza. The proposal also includes increasing the width of the pedestrian pathway on the Pacific Hwy parallel to the new Plaza incorporating a series of bus shelters for commuters. In addition, the proposal seeks to convert Canberra Ave into a designated share use area including a “Kiss and Ride” drop off zone, access ramps for pedestrians and cyclists and direct Elevator access to the Plaza from the South. 

 

The Plaza is a focal point linking; St Leonard’s Station, the Forum and the new Crow Nest Metro Light-Rail via the commercial retail precinct and beyond through Friedlander Place.  The open green space has been developed by Arcadia Landscape Design and will adopt best practice in landscape urban design and safety in design providing; accessibility, improved lighting, occasional seating, a village green with deep soil planting and tree cover at the edges and a regional scale adventure playground.

 

A detailed flythrough  of the proposed plaza has been produced to allow easier visualisation of the proposal. It is now proposed to undertake community consultation to obtain feedback on the design.

 

 

Image 1:  Artist Impression - Landscape overview

 

Image 2: Artist Impression of the Proposed Plaza

 

Project Timeline

 

The construction of the St Leonard’s Plaza is planned to commence in late 2021 and be completed by the end of 2022. A project construction program has been developed which is based on utilizing existing rail line closures for works throughout 2022. Part of the plaza super structure is already complete with the JQZ development to the East constructed to provide support for the over rail components of Council’s structure. Council has included in the Draft 2021/22 Budget $20M to allow project construction to commence. Early works for the auxiliary components of the Plaza are proposed for late 2021.

 

Council’s progress to date follows a significant level of commitment and resources by Council and other key Government Authorities working closely through a complex and stringent process. The finalisation of design, statutory approval process and documentation for the procurement and engagement of a Sydney Trains Accredited AEO Head Contractor all form part of the next phase of this project through to construction.

 

The project relies heavily on the cooperation of Sydney Trains, the successful planning and execution of a combination of external and internal rail corridor related works will bring about the realization of the St Leonard’s Plaza through to completion which is anticipated for late 2022. 

 

Naming of the Open Space

 

During the concept phase for the over-rail Plaza the project has been commonly referred to as St Leonard’s Plaza. Given the progression of the project it is now time to consider whether this remains the permanent name for this exciting public space.

 

It is therefore proposed that Council receive suggestions from the community on naming the space. Council would then select from the suggestions a name that is local, meaningful and inclusive and conforms with the guiding principles set out by the Geographical Names Board.

 

It is proposed that the following process be adopted by Council to determine the permanent name of the project:

 

1.   Community Input: The Community will be invited to suggest place names which are local, meaningful and reflect an inclusive space.

2.   Name Shortlist: Council will review the names and develop a shortlist of names.

3.   Community Consultation: Of the names shortlisted, the community is asked to nominate their least preferred name.

4.   Name Selection: Council considers the feedback from the consultation and chooses a name from the most preferred names.

 

NSW Public Legacy Program Funding

 

Council nominated this project for funding under the NSW Government’s Public Spaces Legacy Program. Council on 6 May, 2021 was advised that it has been successful in obtaining a $4.75 million grant for the landscape elements of the project. Under the program, Council is required to accelerate the assessment and determination of local development applications and rezonings for the period of 1 September 2021 to 30 June 2021. Council is on track to achieve the required results of a median processing time of less than 52 days. The Grant requires construction to completed by the end of 2022.

 

Community Consultation

 

The next phase of the project is to undertake consultation on the proposed design of the space and the proposed long-term name.

 

Statement of Intent

 

The consultation is designed to ascertain the community’s views on the landscape design of the space and provide suggestions for a permanent name for the open space. Any comments received will be reviewed and may be taken into consideration in further design development stages.

 

Method

 

Level of Participation

Inform

Inform

Consult

Form of Participation

Open

Targeted

Open

Target Audience

Community and community groups

Key message givers; local development stakeholders and authorities’ groups

Community

Proposed Medium

Advertisement, Website Exhibition, Social Media and

eNewsletter

Letters

 

Survey

Community Design Presentation

Indicative Timing

May to July

 


 

Conclusion

 

Council’s vision for a new community focal point at St Leonards, being a new open space and bus transit area is on track to be delivered by the end of 2022. Consistent with this new momentum, Council’s 2021/22 Budget includes funding to commence construction given the imminent finalisation of the approval processes to allow procurement to commence. It is now appropriate Council undertake consultation on the proposed design of the space and the proposed long-term name.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

1.   The report be received and noted.

2.   Council undertake community consultation for a period of six weeks as per the consultation strategy outlined in the report; and

3.   Following the exhibition period a report on the suggestions for the permanent naming of the project, together with a report on any submissions received and any proposed amendments, be submitted to Council for consideration.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Architectural Plans

5 Pages

 

  


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 May 2021

Local Housing Strategy - Public Exhibition

 

 

Subject:          Local Housing Strategy - Public Exhibition    

Record No:    SU7615 - 22341/21

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):      Lara Fusco 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The purpose of this report is to outline the role, planning functions, and outcomes of the Local Housing Strategy (LHS) and endorse it for public exhibition. This draft LHS (AT-1) has been prepared by HillPDA on behalf of Council.

 

This LHS provides an evidence-based framework with recommendations to guide the delivery of housing in the Lane Cove LGA to meet the needs of a growing and diverse population for the next 20 years. Council’s LHS will achieve the following:

 

·    Consider and identify the housing needs of the current and future population;

·    Review and offers guidance regarding statutory planning responses to guide the preparation and assessment of future development applications; and

·    Evaluate the current policy positions of State and Council authorities regarding housing, offering a range of policy and other non-statutory planning responses to support the delivery of housing that is affordable, accessible, sustainable and well serviced by infrastructure.

 

To comply with both Regional and District Plan requirements, this LHS must also confirm housing delivery targets for the following periods:

 

·    0-5 year period (from 2016 – 2021);

·    6-10 year period (from 2021 – 2026); and

·    11-20 year period (from 2026 – 2036).

 

In the case of both the 0-5 year and 6-10 year periods, these targets have already been set by the Greater Sydney Commission (GSC). When combined, Lane Cove has an initial 10 year target (from 2016 – 2026) of between 4,900 – 5,400 new dwellings. For the 11-20 year period, Council’s LHS must identify its capacity to contribute more new dwellings to achieve a District-wide target.

 

Based on the analysis, Council is on track to meet, and in some instances exceed, the housing targets set by the GSC. It is anticipated that the 0-5 year target of 1,900 new dwellings will be exceeded by approximately 500 dwellings (totaling approximately 2,400 dwellings). For the 6-10 year period, the GSC required Council’s LHS to demonstrate that between 3,000 – 3,500 new dwellings could be delivered. Due to the strength of the existing approved development pipeline, and availability of other theoretical capacity across the LGA, Council is well placed to meet and exceed the 6-10 year target. Overall, Council is well-placed to exceed the combined 10 year housing target (from 2016 to 2026) of 4,900 to 5,400 new dwellings.

 

However, for the 11-20 year period, DPIE has projected limited growth for housing in the LGA (after 2026) with potentially only 200 new dwellings anticipated.

 

The Strategy concludes that no upzoning of land for housing is needed for the Lane Cove Local Government Area. It also makes the following recommendations:

 

·    Prioritise growth in centres and St Leonards South;

·    Develop affordable housing strategy;

·    Encourage (existing) medium density housing;

·    Continue to prioritise the delivery and improvement of infrastructure;

·    Broaden universal and adaptable housing delivery;

·    Preserve and enhance character and heritage;

·    Incorporate sustainable design outcomes; and

·    Monitor and review, as part of Council’s annual reporting process.

 

It is recommended that Council receive and note the report and endorse the Local Housing Strategy for a public exhibition period of six (6) weeks before final adoption and submission to the DPIE for review and endorsement.

 

Background

 

To deliver coordinated outcomes within the NSW State policy context, the development of housing strategies must be aligned with councils’ community strategic planning, local strategic planning statements and local environmental plans. Housing strategies are to be prepared by councils for a local government area or district and given effect through amendments to local environmental plans.

 

A previous frequently asked questions sheet (AT-2) was prepared by the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment to further explain the role of these strategies. Further guidance on housing is found in the following documents.

 

Regional and District Planning

 

The Greater Sydney Commission (GSC) released its plan for the Greater Sydney Region (AT-3) along with its implementation pathway. The subsequent North District Plan (AT-4) is a 20 year plan to manage growth in the context of economic, social and environmental matters to achieve the 40year vision for Greater Sydney.

 

Action 17 of the North District Plan states that all Council’s (i.e. Lane Cove Council) must complete an LHS with the following considerations:

 

Prepare local or district housing strategies that address the following:

a.   the delivery of five-year housing supply targets for each local government area

b.   the delivery of 6–10 year (when agreed) housing supply targets for each local government area

c.   capacity to contribute to the longer term 20-year strategic housing target for the District

d.   the housing strategy requirements outlined in Objective 10 of A Metropolis of Three Cities that include:

i.    creating capacity for more housing in the right locations

ii.    supporting planning and delivery of growth areas and planned precincts as relevant to each local government area

iii.   supporting investigation of opportunities for alignment with investment in regional and district infrastructure

iv.  supporting the role of centres.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Local Housing Strategy Guideline

 

To deliver these plans, DPIE has prepared guidelines to support housing strategies. The Local Housing Strategy Guideline and template (AT-5) contains the structure that all strategies must use to respond to how housing components of Regional and District Plans will be delivered locally.

 

The Guideline recommends that Councils establish regular monitoring and reporting to inform a review program that includes:

 

·    Annual review of housing delivery and supply against the implementation and delivery plan to ensure that the LHS and the LEP are delivering the LHS objectives in a timely manner;

·    Five-yearly reviews of the evidence base and housing stock against the broader aims of the District and Regional Plans to ensure that the LHS is aligned with the housing needs;

·    A ten-year review of the LHS to ensure that the 20-year vision statement, the evidence base and the strategic and planning contexts are aligned with the goals of the community, the broader aims of the district and regional plans, and the LHS implementation and delivery plan.

 

Local Strategic Planning Statement

 

Council’s Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS) (AT-6) outlines its own vision for a connected, inclusive and sustainable community. The vision for liveability, which incorporates Council’s Principles for Housing in Planning Priority 5, is extracted below. The vision provides clear priorities for where housing will be located, the form it will take, how it will integrate with the Lane Cove culture, and the infrastructure required to support it.

 

“Our liveable community will be well-designed and based on best practice and sustainable design principles. New residential development will be appropriately located near transport nodes, infrastructure and services and will harmonise with our natural landscapes, and with existing and emerging streetscapes. There will be a diverse range of housing options, including key worker and affordable options, with access to jobs, services and public transport. Heritage items and areas will be conserved and celebrated. …

 

Traffic management in major centres and shopping areas will focus on the safe and efficient movement of people and vehicles. …

 

Public places will be vibrant, walkable and safe and cater for people of all ages, abilities and backgrounds. They will provide infrastructure to encourage free movement, community participation and the opportunity for social connections to be made …”

 

Council’s Local Strategic Planning Statement was endorsed by the Greater Sydney Commission on 27 March 2020. In its letter of support (see AT-7), the Commission stated that Council’s Local Housing Strategy was to show how it can meet a 6-10 year (2021-2026) housing target range between 3,000 – 3,500 new dwellings. The Local Housing Strategy had to also address Action 17 of the North District Plan and be consistent with the Local Housing Strategy Guideline and Template.

 


 

Council’s Draft Local Housing Strategy

 

Overall, to address housing supply, housing strategies are to be developed by councils to:

 

·    make provision for the anticipated growth associated with the 0–5 and 6–10 year housing targets;

·    align projected growth with existing and proposed local infrastructure and open space improvements (refer to Planning Priorities N1, N3 and N20 of the North District Plan);

·    identify the right locations for growth, including areas that are unsuitable for significant change in the short to medium term;

·    identify capacity to contribute to the District’s 20-year strategic housing target;

·    inform the Affordable Rental Housing Target Schemes for development precincts; and

·    coordinate the planning and delivery of local and State infrastructure.

The analysis in Council’s LHS is supported by:

·    A review of the relevant strategic and statutory planning framework by the NSW Government and Council;

·    An analysis of the LGA characteristics that influence the opportunities and constraints for housing and supporting services;

·    A demographic and housing supply analysis that considers how certain factors influence demand for housing and the potential gaps in housing provision; and

·    A housing pipeline, trend and demand analysis that provides insights for how housing is anticipated to be delivered in the future and the potential for shortfalls in the supply of certain types of housing.

 

Discussion

 

Document structure

 

Council’s LHS comprises the following chapters, prepared in accordance with the relevant strategic policies and documents:

 

·    Chapter 1 – Introduction: Introduces the premises of the Lane Cove LHS.

·    Chapter 2 – Lane Cove LGA: Summarises the location and characteristics of the Lane Cove LGA.

·    Chapter 3 – Planning and policy context: Identifies the components of the NSW planning framework and policy considerations that are relevant for housing in the Lane Cove LGA.

·    Chapter 4 – Housing supply and demand: Considers the characteristics of the Lane Cove LGA’s population, households, workers and housing, including projected changes.

·    Chapter 5 – Planning review: Reviews the planning controls and issues relevant to housing delivery in the Lane Cove LGA.

·    Chapter 6 – Housing priorities: Describes the objectives and priorities of the Lane Cove LHS based on an analysis of the evidence.

·    Chapter 7 – Action and implementation plan: Sets out an action plan to guide the delivery of housing in the Lane Cove LGA to 2026 and beyond.

 

Housing vision

 

Themes for the LHS have been identified through the analysis of the evidence base and evaluation of responses as well as the core vision for liveability from Council’s LSPS. These themes build upon established themes in Council’s LSPS to address specific needs for housing to 2036 and beyond. Through the LHS, Lane Cove Council will:

 

Sustainability: provide housing that is increasingly sustainable. New housing will incorporate responsive solutions to the environmental challenges of today and tomorrow. Existing housing will integrate adaptive technologies and design solutions to ensure a long lifespan that reduces consumption over time.

 

Affordability: increase its supply of affordable housing, increasing the opportunities for those that have close connections to the area. The delivery and management of affordable housing will recognise that it can be difficult for those without significant means to secure housing.

 

Liveability: deliver housing where supporting infrastructure is planned or present. Infrastructure will be improved over time to meet the evolving needs of existing and future Lane Cove LGA residents.

 

Key Characteristics

 

As of the 2016 Census, the estimated population of the Lane Cove LGA was 37,694 people. In 2020 this has increased to 40,534 people, representing a per annum increase of almost 3 per cent. This population growth has remained steady since 2011, when the population was about 31,500 people. Overall, this represents a growth of about 28.6 percent over nine years.

 

Key characteristics of the Lane Cove LGA have been summarised in the figure below, with comparisons to Greater Sydney for reference. The Lane Cove LGA population has several similarities with the overall Greater Sydney population, with some key differences:

 

·    More households consisting of couples without children and lone households

·    Fewer households that speak a language other than English at home, despite similar proportions of overseas born residents

·    Fewer households living in need of assistance with day to day activities.

 

(approximately)

 

Source: Profile .id and Australian Bureau of Statistics

 

Figure: Lane Cove (green) demography comparisons with Greater Sydney (blue).

Liveability analysis

 

One of the core principles of the North District Plan is liveability. The District Plan suggests that maintaining and improving liveability requires housing, infrastructure and services that meet people’s needs, and the provision of a range of housing types in the right locations with measures to improve affordability. A holistic analysis of liveability and accessibility of neighbourhoods in the Lane Cove LGA has been included as an additional analysis within Council’s LHS.

 

Each residential lot in the Lane Cove LGA has been given a score, broadly representing its overall liveability and accessibility. The purpose of this analysis is to provide a broad overview of the benefits of having a diverse range of key services and infrastructure in walkable catchments.

Scores have been calculated based on access to the following:

 

·    Within 800 m of either a ferry wharf or train station

·    Within 400 m of a:

Centre

Community facility

Bus stop

Open space (any)

Public primary school.

 

The areas with highest scores were around Lane Cove Village and Greenwich. These scores are driven by a mix of access to centres, community facilities, schools or the train and ferry network. Residents can be expected to have easy walkable access to a range of facilities without relying on private vehicle transport. Refer to figure below.

 

Scores should be reviewed when planning new infrastructure, with the goal of improving walkability. For instance, locating community assets near neighbourhood centres would help increase the diversity of those locations and provide a range of opportunities to walk to nearby infrastructure and strengthen those centres.

Figure: High liveability scored areas

 

Demographics

 

As discussed in Section 4 of the LHS, Lane Cove households have significantly higher incomes than Greater Sydney household with higher housings costs. Despite this, levels of housing stress are lower. While incomes and housing costs are higher generally, they are not uniformly across the LGA. The areas that are most dense, such as Lane Cove North, Pacific Highway and Burns Bay Road, have the lowest levels of home ownership and median income, while also having the highest levels of rental stress. These provide important local contexts when considering the housing needs of current and future populations.

 

Housing supply and projected demand

 

While the housing landscape remained relatively stable between the 2006 and 2011 Census, the period between the 2011 and 2016 Census showed a significant increase in high density dwellings. This coincides with Council’s implementation of the Standard Instrument through the Lane Cove LEP in early 2010, which facilitated residential growth. Between the 2006 and 2016 Census there were the following changes in the number of dwellings:

 

·    High density: 2,200 additional dwellings

·    Medium density: 400 additional dwellings

·    Separate houses: 150 fewer dwellings. Note: the decrease in separate houses likely represents dwellings that were converted to other housing types.

 

Based on the analysis, Lane Cove LGA’s residential population is projected to grow significantly over the period from 2016 to 2026 and remain relatively stable from 2026 to 2036. The components and overall population change over the period.

 

Household projections are derived from the projected population based on average household size and implied dwellings are derived from the average dwelling occupancy rate, shown in the table below. DPIE projections indicate that approximately 4,816 additional dwellings (+30.2 per cent) would be required by 2036 beyond 2016 supplies.

 

As discussed above, DPIE’s 2019 population projections suggest that overall growth will be flat in the years beyond 2026. 

 

Projection

2016

2021

2026

2031

2036

Change 2016-2036

DPIE projected population

37,694

43,768

48,429

48,497

48,218

+10,524 (27.9%)

DPIE projected households

14,536

16,947

18,782

18,825

18,933

+4,397 (30.2%)

DPIE implied dwellings

15,921

18,562*

20,572*

20,619*

20,737

+4,816 (30.2%)

Table: Comparison of population, household and dwelling projections for Lane Cove LGA

 

Capacity

 

Current construction data reveals that Lane Cove has approved 1,900 new dwellings in the development pipeline. The recent rezoning of the St Leonards South precinct would theoretically provide an additional 1,850 new dwellings.

 

Further analysis demonstrates that existing land zoned for medium and high density potentially has capacity to deliver an additional 1,250 dwellings however both are considered too difficult to develop to full capacity. The take-up of medium density land has historically been slow and the remnant high density land (particularly along the Pacific Highway corridor) are extremely restricted due to the presence of the Lane Cove tunnel and tunnel air stacker filter.

 

Changes to Council’s Development Control Plan are only recommended for existing medium density land (zoned R3). No changes to the Development Control Plan are recommended for existing high-density land (zoned R4).    

 

Housing Targets

 

0-5 year period (2016-2021)

 

Council’s analysis of housing approvals and planned construction activity confirm that Council is on track to exceed 1,900 dwellings with approximately 2,400 dwellings anticipated to be delivered during the period. This results in an exceedance of approximately 500 dwellings. In line previous assurances sought from the GSC, this surplus may be counted towards the following period for the years 2021 to 2026 (6-10 year).

 

6-10 year period (2021-2026)

 

A 6 to 10 year target for the years 2021 to 2026 has also been set by the Greater Sydney Commission (AT-7) with Council required to deliver between 3,000 and 3,500 dwellings for this period.

 

Given the strength of the existing approved development pipeline, principally due to St Leonard’s South Planned Precinct, and availability of theoretical capacity across the LGA, Council is well placed to meet the current overall 2016 to 2026 housing target of 4,900 to 5,400 dwellings.

 

11-20 year period (2026-2036)

 

Meeting housing demand over 20 years requires a longer-term outlook. A Metropolis of Three Cities sets a District 20-year strategic housing target of 92,000.

 

DPIE has projected limited growth for housing in the LGA in the 2026 to 2036 period, with only 200 dwellings anticipated during the period. The limited growth is likely due to an assumption that nearly all dwelling capacity will be used by that time. Given the high prices for housing, there is likely to be high demand for housing should there be capacity.

 

The additional capacity beyond the established 2026 target gives Council a unique opportunity to seek delivery of housing types that are most needed, such as affordable housing and medium density housing. However, no further upzoning of land for housing is likely to be needed for Lane Cove.

 

Other priorities

 

In addition to the housing targets, the strategy also recommends that Council:

 

·    Develop an affordable housing strategy;

·    Review existing controls for medium density housing (in Development Control Plan);

·    Continue to prioritise the delivery and improvement of infrastructure;

·    Review its Development Control Plan requirements for visitability;

·    Consider areas of character and heritage; and

·    Incorporate sustainable design outcomes.

 

Monitoring, reviewing and reporting

 

The final part of a Local Housing Strategy relates to monitoring and reviewing the local housing outcomes and housing priorities. It is recommended whenever regular monitoring identifies considerable changes in the housing supply or demand, or demographic, economic or environmental conditions, the LHS may need to be holistically reviewed. The delivery of housing in Sydney is currently monitored by the state government and this will continue to occur.

 

The Action and Implementation Plan includes planning and non-planning mechanisms to provide a complete view of the roles and responsibilities for delivering the directions identified.

 

Timeframes have been provided to generally align with the target periods outlined in the District Plan:

 

·    Short term: 2021 to 2022;

·    Medium term: 2022 to 2026;

·    Long term: 2026 to 2036.

 

State government and other stakeholders will also be responsible for planning and delivering key infrastructure and certain planning outcomes.

 

The housing recommendations for Council’s LHS are as follows:

 

1.   Recommendation: No further upzonings

Action

Primary stakeholder

Timeframe

Further upzonings are not required to meet housing requirements for the LGA.

LCC

Ongoing

 

2.   Recommendation: Adopt housing targets

Action

Primary stakeholder

Timeframe

Confirm 2016 to 2026 housing target of 4,900 to 5,400 dwellings.

LCC; DPIE; GSC

Short term

Confirm post 2026 housing target of between 500 to 1,000 dwellings, pending completion of the 2021 Census, subsequent DPIE projections and approvals/construction of St Leonards South.

LCC; GSC

Medium term;

Long term

 

3.   Recommendation: Prioritise growth in centres and St Leonards South

Action

Primary stakeholder

Timeframe

Continue the strategic position of Council for new growth to be focused in St Leonards South.

LCC; DPIE

Ongoing

 

4.   Recommendation: Develop affordable housing policy

Action

Primary stakeholder

Timeframe

Research affordable housing provision in the Lane Cove LGA and prepare an affordable housing policy to deliver that housing.

LCC; Community housing providers

Short term

Adopt and implement a Lane Cove Affordable Housing Strategy.

LCC; Community housing providers

Medium term;

Long term

Only pursue planning proposals or other planning framework changes in the Lane Cove LGA if they include a principal affordable housing purpose and are consistent with Council’s ‘Principles for the location of additional housing’ in its Local Strategic Planning Statement.

LCC; DPIE

Ongoing

 

5.   Recommendation: Encourage medium density housing

Action

Primary stakeholder

Timeframe

Research and design test potential DCP provisions to encourage development of medium density housing in Council’s R3 Medium Density Residential zones, with the goal of promoting smaller and affordable housing.

LCC

Short term;

Medium term

Amend the Lane Cove DCP to encourage medium density development.

LCC

Medium term

 

6.   Recommendation: Continue to prioritise the delivery and improvement of infrastructure

Action

Primary stakeholder

Timeframe

Implement the St Leonards South Section 7.11 development contributions plan

LCC; IPART

Short term

Review and implement a revised LGA-wide Section 7.11 development contributions plan (excluding St Leonards South)

LCC

Short term;

Medium term

Investigate, and if appropriate, prepare and adopt a Section 7.12 development contributions plan

LCC

Short term

Research and establish long term revenue streams for infrastructure development, as per the Infrastructure Contributions Review

LCC;

State Government

Medium term;

Long term

Advocate for the delivery of State led infrastructure

LCC;

State Government

Ongoing

 

7.   Recommendation:       Broaden universal and adaptable housing delivery

Action

Primary stakeholder

Timeframe

Amend the Lane Cove DCP visitability requirements to reference the Liveable Housing Guideline’s silver requirements for all apartments (or more relevant best practice if identified by the Design and Place SEPP)

LCC; DPIE

Short term

Investigate and implement reductions in medium density visitability requirements to encourage small and more affordable dwellings

LCC

Short term;

Medium term

 

8.   Recommendation:       Preserve and enhance character and heritage

Action

Primary stakeholder

Timeframe

Ensure future character and heritage controls seek to preserve and enhance character while also encouraging innovation and adaptation of the trends of the day.

LCC

Ongoing

 

9.   Recommendation:       Incorporate sustainable design outcomes

Action

Primary stakeholder

Timeframe

Amend Lane Cove DCP to strengthen provisions regarding retention and expansion of vegetation, specifically the tree canopy.

LCC

Short term;

Medium term

Develop guidelines for sustainable water and energy elements in all new development applications related to new or existing housing.

LCC

Short term;

Medium term

Investigate Council’s ability to incorporate sustainable elements in new development.

LCC

Short term

Medium term

Identify and pursue Council and State led initiatives for delivery of sustainable infrastructure.

LCC;

State Government

Ongoing

 

10.  Recommendation:       Monitor and review

Action

Primary stakeholder

Timeframe

Undertake annual reviews of housing delivery, Council’s actions and related subjects and report back to Council as part of the annual reporting process.

LCC

Ongoing

 

Community Consultation

 

Statement of Intent

 

The consultation is designed to obtain community feedback on the Draft LHS. Any comments received will be reviewed and considered to help refine the plan’s content prior to finalisation and submission to DPIE.

 

 

Method

 

The following table outlines the consultation strategy and methods that will be used for this Draft Strategy across a range of stakeholders.

 

Level of Participation

Inform

Inform

Consult

Form of Participation

Open

Targeted

Open

Target Audience

Lane Cove Community and community groups

Government Agencies and adjoining Local Government Areas

 

Lane Cove Community

Proposed Medium

Advertisement,

eNewsletter and social media

 

Notification Letters

Public Exhibition,

Website Exhibition

 

Indicative Timing

May-June 2021

May-June 2021

May-June 2021

 

 

Conclusion

 

Council has prepared a Draft Local Housing Strategy in accordance with the relevant strategic planning documents which is now ready for public exhibition.

 

Submissions received during the public exhibition period will be collated and the issues raised will be addressed in a post-consultation report to Council.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

 

1.   Receive and note the report;

 

2.   Endorse the Draft Local Housing Strategy (LHS) for public exhibition;

 

3.   Undertake community consultation for a period of six (6) weeks as per the Community Participation Plan;

 

4.   Following public exhibition, present a report back to Council of any submissions received for consideration by Council.

 

 

Christopher Pelcz

Coordinator - Strategic Planning

Environmental Services Division

 

 

 

Mark Brisby

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Draft Local Housing Strategy - May 2021

96 Pages

 

AT‑2View

Local Housing Strategy - FAQs (October 2018)

3 Pages

 

AT‑3View

Greater Sydney Regional Plan

194 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑4View

North District Plan

132 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑5View

Local Housing Strategy - Guideline and Template

34 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑6View

Council's Local Strategic Planning Statement

83 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑7View

Letter of support for Council's Local Strategic Planning Statement

9 Pages

 

  


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 May 2021

Mental Health Services in Lane Cove

 

 

Subject:          Mental Health Services in Lane Cove    

Record No:    SU129 - 25482/21

Division:         Human Services Division

Author(s):      Susan Heyne 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

In October 2020, Council resolved to explore and expand its role in the mental health landscape as a local resource to disseminate information, provide community support and advocacy to residents struggling with mental health issues and illness, and prevention. 

 

Mental health is a significant issue that can have a huge impact on every aspect of a person’s life.  In 2019, almost 40% of the population in Northern Sydney were identified as having a mental health issue.

Mental health services in the Northern Sydney Region are funded by a variety of different sources.  However, research by local health services and both the State and Commonwealth Governments have found the delivery of mental health services is fragmented and there is a lack of community knowledge about what services are available and how they can be accessed. 

 

This report outlines how Council can increase its role to address the issues identified in the current research into mental health across Australia.  National, state and regional reports have all identified that, despite increased funding to support people with mental health issues and illnesses, service delivery is fragmented, general community awareness around mental health is lacking, the services available and how to access them needs to improve, and discrimination and stigma linked to mental illness continues to exist.

 

The report also outlines a framework for Mental Health Month 2021 that will raise awareness, reduce stigma and celebrate mental wellbeing. It is recommended Council work with the Northern Sydney Local Health District (NSLHD) and the Northern Sydney Primary Health Network (NSPHN) to implement strategies to provide further support to the local community and launch Mental Health month at the Lane Cove Rotary Fair.

 

Background

Council at its meeting of 19 October 2020 resolved, that Council:-

“1.    Explore and expand its role in the mental health landscape as a local resource to disseminate information, provide community support and advocacy to residents struggling with mental health issues, illness and prevention;

2.     Develops a framework around Mental Health Month that builds awareness, reduces stigma surrounding mental illness and celebrates mental health; and that

3.   Receive a report on the above.”

 

Almost half of Australians aged between 16 and 85 years will experience a common mental illness in their lifetime and one in five Australians experience a common mental illness each year. Up to one in five children will have a parent with a mental health issue and suicide was the main cause of death for Australians aged 15 to 49 years in 2019. 

 

Mental health has a huge impact on every aspect of people’s lives.  It affects behaviour, physical health, work and relationships. It also has an impact on the people around them including family, friends and neighbours. People living with mental ill-health are at higher risk of having physical health issues, being unemployed, being homeless and being in prison.  The estimated cost of mental ill-health in Australia is up to $220 billion each year.

 

In the Northern Sydney Region, as at June 2019, almost 40% of the population were identified as having a mental health issue with 8.9% reporting high or very high psychological distress.  The number of hospitalisations for mental disorders in Northern Sydney was 2,474 per 100,000 of the population, this is above the NSW average of 1,909 per 100,000.

 

Discussion

 

Mental health services in Northern Sydney are delivered by a variety of providers including the Commonwealth and NSW governments, community managed organisations, schools and universities, private clinicians, general practices and private hospitals. This broad range of providers has resulted in a fragmented service delivery system. Other issues that have been identified through regional consultations by the Northern Sydney Local Health District (NSLHD) and the Northern Sydney Primary Health Network (NSPHN) are a lack of community knowledge of available service and how to access them; the need for an accessible, complete and updated service directory; provision of culturally appropriate services; consistent use of language; and the issue of stigma and discrimination towards people with a mental illness. 

 

The relationship between mental illness and other social, economic and health factors means that the potential to improve people’s mental health may come from outside the health sector. Social determinants that influence mental health and wellbeing include:

·    feeling safe, stable and secure;

·    connections with family, friends, culture and community;

·    something meaningful to do; and

·    something to look forward to.

 

As part of the Living Well in Focus 2020-2024 strategic plan by the Mental Health Commission of NSW, Local Government was identified as one of the services that plays an important role in developing stronger community networks and improving the wellbeing of the community.

 

Council already plays a significant role in supporting residents struggling with mental health issues and improving community wellbeing.  This is done by either providing direct services, events and activities or by supporting other services to create connections with local residents.    Examples of services Council currently provides include:

 

Youth Services

-     Referrals to mental health services for young people attending the youth centre

-     Wellness Wednesday – activities to promote wellness

-     Webinars for parents including Parenting Teenagers Post-Coronavirus Lockdown with Michael Carr Gregg

-     the youth centre is an ACON recognised ‘safe place’ for LGBTQI young people

Aged and Disability

-     Men’s Community Kitchen – teaching men how to cook nutritious meals

-     Monthly Lane Cove Connection – Newsletter to keep older residents informed of local events and relevant issues.  Distribution is to over 1,500 addresses via post and email as well as being available online.

-     Seniors Festival – as series of events to support and celebrate older people

-     Carers Week – information and activities to support carers

-     World AIDS day – seminar on current HIV/AIDS issues and celebrating diversity

-     Dementia Café

-     Referrals to Sydney Community Services for support, information, referrals to appropriate services.

-     Funding to Community Connect (Community Transport) to run monthly social outings for older men in partnership with Sydney Community Services (the BOOMers group). 

Community Services General

-     International Women’s Day – supporting and celebrating the achievements of women

-     Get that job! supporting people to find meaningful employment

-     Community Grants – supporting local organisations through financial grants to provide services and activities for residents that include and engage the community

-     ClubGRANTS – supporting local community organisations through financial assistance to provide services to the community

-     referrals to mental health services for people seeking assistance

Facilities

-     Halls and community rooms for hire at community rates

-     Rent free or below market rate premises for community organisations

Cultural programs

-     Australia Day celebrations – including free movies for the whole family

-     Festival by the river

-     The Lane Cove Rotary Fair

-     Autumn Harmony

-     ANZAC Day

-     Citizenship ceremonies

-     Citizenship awards recognizing the contributions of Lane Cove residents.

-     Quarterly newsletters to keep the community informed of local events and news.

Gallery Lane Cove

-     Providing financial and in-kind support to Gallery Lane Cove to hold exhibitions and run workshops for the community

The Library

-     English classes

-     A safe place for people to go of all ages

-     information on services

-     HSC support

-     workshops and events on a range of topics

-     home library service

-     Literary awards

-     Meeting rooms for local community groups

-     Dementia friendly space

Bushcare

-     Local Bushcare groups

-     Community Nursery

-     Free guided bushwalks

-     Bushkids activities

-     Volunteering opportunities

Open spaces

-     Parks, and sports fields that are well maintained, accessible and have facilities to encourage public use.

-     Playgrounds that are accessible and inclusive

 

While Council’s actions are significant, there is still more that Council can do particularly in the area of disseminating information, advocating for residents, raising awareness and celebrating wellbeing in a way that reduces stigma.

 

Increasing engagement and connections with culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) community members may be another area where Council can improve mental health support.  The CALD community has been identified as a priority target group and ensuring information is translated into community languages will assist Council in supporting this potentially vulnerable community. Support services currently provided by Council include English conversation classes through the Library and the work of the Cultural Programs team and the Cultural Plan.  The Community Service team has also recently submitted a funding application to the 2021 Investing in Women Program administered by the NSW Department of Communities and Justice.  The purpose of this funding application is to create a Lane Cove Multicultural Women’s Skillsharing Hub with the aim of supporting women to build social networks and share skills and knowledge with other women.

 

The NSLHD and the NSPHN are working together and have developed a Regional Plan including priority areas to address the fragmentation of service delivery, building community capacity, improving physical health and nutrition, improving health literacy, improving outcomes of priority groups and enhancing coordination and service access. To ensure that Lane Cove residents get the benefit of improved information and service delivery, it is recommended that Council work with the NSLHD and NSPHN to disseminate information and provide support to the local community.  Methods of disseminating information could include Council’s website, social media pages, newsletters and distribution of promotional materials to Council facilities and local businesses. 

Council can play a role in improving support to residents struggling with mental health issues by working with local mental health services to provide information that is accurate and current; by providing support, particularly in areas outside of the health sector that can have a positive influence on mental health and wellbeing; by advocating on behalf of residents; and by raising awareness of mental health in a way that celebrates wellbeing and reduces stigma associated with mental illness. 

 

Mental Health Month is celebrated in October and World Mental Health Day in 2021 is Sunday, 10 October.  In 2021 World Mental Health Day falls on the same day as the Lane Cove Rotary Village Fair.  It is proposed that the Fair will be the launchpad for Mental Health Month in 2021.  Proposed events and activities during Mental Health Month will include activities that encourage people to come together as a community, promote wellbeing, provide tools to support people to look after their mental health, and offer insight into mental illness that brings greater understanding of the issues, challenges stereotypes and reduces the stigma associated with mental illness.  Some events will be targeted at specific social groups, particularly those identified as priority groups within the Northern Sydney Region such as young people and people from culturally and linguistically diverse communities.

 

Conclusion

 

Mental health is an issue that affects almost everyone in the community.  Local Councils have been identified as an enabler of community wellbeing. Lane Cove Council can play a role in supporting its residents in the area of mental health by providing information about services, creating opportunities to raise awareness about mental health and by continuing to engage in cultural programs and activities that build community connections.

 

Proposed events for Mental Health Month 2021 include a guided meditation session, which is in response to the feedback we received from the Yoga on the Village Green sessions from International Women’s Day, a laughter workshop, a cooking/nutrition workshop, a speaker event to focus on stigma and discrimination.  There will also be a mental health event linked to Carers Week which also falls in October, focusing on supporting carers and their mental health and an awareness raising event for young people.

 

Details of the launch of Mental Health Week is being developed with Council staff involved with the Village Fair. The theme for Mental Health Month is yet to be announced by WayAhead, the organisation running the annual campaign for over 80 years.  Once we know what the theme is we will integrate it into the launch and use it as a guide in the development of events across the month. 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council:-

1.   Work with the Northern Sydney Local Health District (NSLHD) and the Northern Sydney Primary Health Network (NSPHN) to provide further support to the local community;

2.   Continue its existing programs and events and expand the provision of information to the local community; and

3.   Launch Mental Health month at the Lane Cove Rotary Fair.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Gornall

Executive Manager - Human Services

Human Services Division

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.  


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 May 2021

Building Upgrade Finance - Environmental Upgrade Agreement

 

 

Subject:          Building Upgrade Finance - Environmental Upgrade Agreement    

Record No:    SU7704 - 25933/21

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):      David Stevens 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council has received its first Building Upgrade Finance (BUF) application from a local small business owner for $190,000 to fund the installation of power efficient building treatments that include but are not limited to: glazing (alumiere windows); shade control (rolling screens) and solar energy monitoring devices. Building Upgrade Finance is enabled through amendments to the Local Government Act 1993 (Part 2A Environmental Upgrade Agreements) (LG Act) which allows any local council in NSW to offer Environmental Upgrade Agreements.

 

Council resolved to offer the agreements, with a report to be submitted to Council prior to executing the first agreement. It is recommended the report be received and noted.

 

Background

 

Council at its meeting of 20 July, 2020 considered a report in relation to Building Upgrade Finance – Improving Environmental Performance of Commercial Buildings, and resolved that:-

“1.  The report be received and noted;

2.   Council implement a Building Upgrade Finance program to non-residential precincts across the LGA.

3.   Council delegate authority to the General Manager to:-

a.   Develop the necessary administrative and contractual arrangements for the          operation of Environmental Upgrade Agreements; and

b.   Enter into Environmental Upgrade Agreements, and to make or amend a   Environmental Upgrade Charge under an Environmental Upgrade Agreement.

4.   A report come back to Council detailing the interest rates and general terms and conditions of the first application”.

 

The Building Upgrade Finance program is a type of finance available to building owners to upgrade and improve the energy, water and environmental efficiency or sustainability of existing buildings. These upgrades include solar photovoltaic (PV), LED lighting, efficient air conditioning, wastewater treatment systems, water efficient fixtures and fittings and waste management systems. In NSW, Building Upgrade Finance is provided by a third-party provider and is tied to an Environmental Upgrade Agreement. Council is party to the agreement and collects the repayments on behalf of the financier by levying through the rating system an environmental upgrade charge on the individual property in accordance with an agreed repayment schedule. 

 

Discussion

 

Council is negotiating terms with Better Building Finance (BBF) to support the application approval, processing and loan administration processes. Council in raising awareness and marketing BUF’s as an appropriate way to finance environmentally sustainable commercial building improvements.

BUF provides Council with the framework and tools to help move towards its Emission Reduction targets and aligns with goals in the Delivery Program 2020-22 and Operational Plan 2020-21 by permitting building owners to spread capital cost over time.

 

Council’s Rates and Finance system is well equipped to process the quarterly loan payments in conjunction with the well - established rates notification and administration procedure noting that any BBF engagement is a value – add to Lane Cove’s economic development and environmental sustainability.

 

Commercial banks are typically setting three to five year terms for business loans to finance equipment, fittings and vehicles that are indicatively priced at circa 7%. As discussed in the original report, one clear benefit of the BUF option is the competitive rates for longer terms and added value to the borrower whereby re-payments are smoothed out over a ten (10) year plus period.

 

In terms of the BUF application received, the interest rate(s) and term(s) for the proposed funding are fixed rates more typical of commercial real property loans:-

 

Term

BUF Rate / quarterly repayments

Equivalent Rate / monthly repayments

10 year

5.94%

5.97%

15 year

5.72%

5.75%

20 year

5.84%

5.87%

 

Conclusion

 

Building Upgrade Finance is a way to support community and private sector investment in

environmental upgrades that help Council to achieve strategic priorities and deliver environmental

and economic outcomes for our community.

 

As a leader in sustainable operations, Council is well placed to support the LGA’s small and medium business community with financing solutions that promote enhanced environmental outcomes.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 May 2021

Traffic Committee - April 2021

 

 

Subject:          Traffic Committee - April 2021    

Record No:    SU1326 - 25684/21

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Sashika Perera 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The Lane Cove Traffic Committee Meeting was held on Tuesday, 20 April 2021. The Agenda is included as AT-1. The Traffic Committee recommendations are shown in the Minutes of the Meeting, included as AT-2.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council adopt the recommendations of the Lane Cove Traffic Committee Meeting held on Tuesday, 20 April 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Terescenko

Executive Manager - Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Traffic Committee Agenda - April 2021 - Final

32 Pages

 

AT‑2View

Traffic Committee Minutes - April 2021 - Final

9 Pages

 

  


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 May 2021

Local Government Remuneration Tribunal Annual Report and Determination - Councillor Fees 

 

 

Subject:          Local Government Remuneration Tribunal Annual Report and Determination - Councillor Fees      

Record No:    SU839 - 24753/21

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Simon Cole 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report details the recent determination of the Local Government Remuneration Tribunal (“the Tribunal”) for the annual fees to be paid for the Mayor and Councillors for the 2021/22 financial year, commencing 1 July 2021. The Tribunal has approved a 2% increase for the period. It is recommended Council determine the annual fees to be paid.

 

Background

 

In the current financial year 2020/21, the Tribunal determined there would be no increase to the amount of fees due to the impact on the State and Federal economies of bushfires and the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Discussion

 

In the Tribunal’s report to the Minister for Local Government dated 23 April 2021, it determined that for the financial year 2021/22 that an increase of 2% shall apply to the minimum and maximum annual fees applicable to each category. 

 

The table below shows the current annual fees paid to Lane Cove Councillors and the new minimum and maximum annual fees as determined by the Tribunal:-

 

 

Current Annual Fee

New Minimum Annual Fee

New Maximum Annual Fee

Mayor

$44,230

$19,970

$45,110

Councillors

$20,280

$9,370

$20,690

 

Council’s draft budget for 2021/22 has made provision for a 2% increase, consistent with the 2% increase in the Rates Peg limit approved by IPART.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council determine the following annual fees to be paid for 2021/22:-

 

·    Mayor: $45,110 (in addition to the Councillors fee) and

·    Councillors: $20,686.

 

Steven Kludass

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 May 2021

Third Quarter Review - 2020/21 Budget

 

 

Subject:          Third Quarter Review - 2020/21 Budget    

Record No:    SU8230 - 24987/21

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Sarah Seaman 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The Third Quarter 2020/21 Budget Review involves a variety of variations in both income and expenditure. Taking into consideration the variations from the Third Quarter Budget Review, the projected 2020/21 overall result has been improved by $1.07M to a surplus of $15.4M. The   operating result before grants and capital contributions forecast has also improved by $1.07M to be a deficit of $3.2M, noting the vast majority of this deficit is the result of the financial impact COVID-19 has had on Council’s operating income throughout 2020/21. 

 

Despite the global COVID-19 pandemic, Council’s projected income for 2020/21 has improved significantly to the point where Council’s forecast 2020/21 Budget deficit has reduced from $4.2M (original adopted forecast deficit) to $3.2M (revised forecast deficit).

 

It is recommended that the Budget be varied in accordance with the proposed variations broadly outlined in this report and specifically identified in the attachment to the report.

 

Background

 

Council is required to prepare a Budget Review Statement each quarter, in accordance with Clause 203 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005. The purpose of these reviews is to ensure that the impacts of financial variations are reflected in the forecast of Council’s global budgetary position to 30 June 2021, and the adopted Budget adjusted accordingly.

 

Discussion

A summary of Council’s revised Budget for 2020/21 and a summary of budget movements have been included in this report:-

 

 

Original Budget

(000’s)

1st Quarter Adjustments

(000’s)

2nd Quarter Adjustments

(000’s)

3rd Quarter Adjustments

(000’s)

Revised Budget

(000’s)

Expenditure - Operating

$52,985

$314

$329

$318

$53,946

Income - Operating

$48,785

$56

$495

$1,388

$50,724

Surplus/(Deficit) before

Capital Grants and   Contributions

($4,200)

($258)

$166

1,070

($3,222)

Income - Capital

$18,225

$400

$0

$0

$18,625

Surplus/ (Deficit)

$14,025

$142

$166

$1,070

$15,403

 

Summary of Budget Movements

 

Operational Expenses

-     $318K Increase in Materials and Contracts which is made up of:

-      $73K Increase for Greening our City

-      $110K Increase for Legal costs for DA Appeals

-      $55K Increase for Restorations

-      $20K Increase for Meeting House Strata Fees

-      $60K Increase for Blackman Park Remedial Works

 

Operational Income

-     $1,388K increase in Operating Income which is made up of:

-      $73K Increase for grant received for Greening our City

-      $100K Decrease for Interest on Investments Income

-      $40K Increase for Developer Applications income

-      $75K Increase for Restorations income

-      $1,300K Increase for less than expected income losses from the COVID-19 pandemic

 

Conclusion

 

The vast majority of proposed variations reflect an improvement in Council’s projected income resulting from a better than anticipated financial recovery from COVID-19. The budget will continue to be closely monitored during the final quarter of the 2020/21 financial year, particularly from a COVID-19 financial impact perspective.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the 2020 -2021 Budget be varied as follows:-

 

 

Original Budget

(000’s)

1st Quarter Adjustments

(000’s)

2nd Quarter Adjustments

(000’s)

3rd Quarter Adjustments

(000’s)

Revised Budget

(000’s)

Expenditure - Operating

$52,985

$314

$329

$318

$53,946

Income - Operating

$48,785

$56

$495

$1,388

$50,724

Surplus/(Deficit) before

Capital Grants and Contributions

($4,200)

($258)

$166

1,070

($3,222)

Income - Capital

$18,225

$400

$0

$0

$18,625

Surplus/ (Deficit)

$14,025

$142

$166

$1,070

$15,403

 

 

 

 

 

Steven Kludass

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Budget Review for the Quarter Ended 31 March 2021

11 Pages

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 May 2021

Third Quarter Review  - Delivery Program and Operational Plan 2020 - 21

 

 

Subject:          Third Quarter Review  - Delivery Program and Operational Plan 2020 - 21    

Record No:    SU238 - 24975/21

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Simon Cole 

 

 

Executive Summary

This report reviews quarterly progress between January and March 2021 towards the goals and strategies adopted by Council in the 2020-21 Delivery Program and Operational Plan.  It is recommended that the report be received and noted.

 

Background

The 2020 - 21 Delivery Program and Operational Plan was endorsed by Council on 15 June 2020. 

The quarterly review of the Operational Plan 2020-21 assists Council to measure performance in meeting the key areas of focus in Council’s Delivery Program.  

The achievements in the financial year and during the Council term are reported against the aspirations of the community contained in the goals and objectives of the Community Strategic Plan, “Liveable Lane Cove: 2035”.

 

Discussion

The Third Quarter Review of the 2020 – 2021 Delivery Program and Operational Plan is attached at AT-1

 

Notable achievements this quarter include:-

 

·    Community Assistance Grants presented to Council for consideration - on public exhibition;

·    The commencement of deliberative democracy process whereby a Community Panel will be formed to consider the best use of the outdoor areas on the Lane Cove Golf Course site to meet community needs, now and in the future;

·    Planning for new community and child-care centres commenced - St Leonards South;

·    Tantallon Oval project commenced – for completion October 2021;

·    Longueville Park Playground upgrade commenced (recently opened);

·    Track upgrade at Woodford Bay completed;

·    Extension of new footpath on River Road - opposite the Lane Cove Golf Course

·    New shared user path on Tambourine Bay Road;

·    A range of sustainability projects including the introduction of a new tree mapping tool, ongoing graffiti removal at various sites, and the Huskee Coffee Swap project was launched in March 2021, and;

·    Resilience planning to support organisational preparedness and identify appropriate actions to mitigate risks associated with future climate events and promote sustainable 'local living’.

 

This quarter witnessed the gradual return of live events in both The Canopy and the Plaza as well as the continuation of some online events.  Fun Fridays and storytime have proved successful over time.   Community events in this quarter included:-

 

·    Australia Day at The Canopy - live music and Australian movies;

·    Lunar New Year Celebration - twilight activation of The Plaza and The Canopy;

·    International Women's Day;

·    Annual Autumn Harmony Festival;

·    Hearing Awareness Week - free hearing tests in the Plaza;

·    Earth Day dinner at the Youth Centre; and,

·    Powerful Owl conservation project event.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receive and note the Third Quarter Review of the 2020 - 2021 Delivery Program and Operational Plan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steven Kludass

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Third Quarter Review of the Delivery Program and Operational Plan 17 May 2021

127 Pages

Available Electronically

  


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 May 2021

Council Snapshot April 2021

 

 

Subject:          Council Snapshot April 2021    

Record No:    SU220 - 26486/21

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):      Craig Wrightson 

 

 

Attached for the information of Councillors is a review of Council’s recent activities. This report provides a summary of the operations of each division for April 2021.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Council Snapshot  - April 2021

31 Pages