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Agenda

Ordinary Council Meeting

7 December 2020

The meeting commences at 6.30pm. If members of the public are

not interested in any business recommended to be considered in

Closed Session or there is no such business, Council will ordinarily

  commence consideration of all other business at 7pm.

 

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Notice of Meeting

 

Dear Councillors

 

Notice is given of the Ordinary Council Meeting, to be held in the Council Chambers on Monday 7 December 2020 commencing at 7:00pm. The business to be transacted at the meeting is included in this business paper.

 

Craig - GMYours faithfully

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

 

Council Meeting Procedures

 

The Council meeting is chaired by the Mayor, Councillor Pam Palmer. Councillors are entitled to one vote on a matter. If votes are equal, the Chairperson has a second or casting vote. When a majority of Councillors vote in favour of a Motion it becomes a decision of the Council. Minutes of Council and Committee meetings are published on Council’s website www.lanecove.nsw.gov.au by 5pm on the Thursday following the meeting.

 

The Meeting is conducted in accordance with Council's Code of Meeting Practice. The order of business is listed in the Agenda on the next page. That order will be followed unless Council resolves to modify the order at the meeting. This may occur for example where the members of the public in attendance are interested in specific items on the agenda.

 

Council uses the online video conferencing platform Zoom for the Public Forum. A link to the video conference, which will include all Councillors attending the Council meeting, will be made available for community members to participate. All speakers wishing to participate in the public forum must register by using the online form no later than midnight, on the day prior to the meeting (i.e. Sunday 6 December) and a Zoom meeting link will be emailed to the provided email address. Please note that the time limit of three minutes per address still applies so please make sure your submission meets this criteria. Alternatively, members of the public can still submit their written address via email to service@lanecove.nsw.gov.au. Written addresses are to be received by Council no later than midnight, on the day prior to the meeting (500 words maximum).

 

If you do not understand any part of the information given above; require assistance to participate in the meeting due to a disability; or wish to obtain information in relation to Council, please contact Council’s Executive Manager – Corporate Services on (02) 9911 3550.

 

Please note meetings held in the Council Chambers are recorded for the purposes of verifying the accuracy of minutes and the tapes are not disclosed to any third party under the Government Information (Public Access)  Act 2009, except as allowed under section 18(1) or section 19(1) of the PPIP Act, or where Council is compelled to do so by court order, warrant or subpoena or by any other legislation.

 

 

 


Ordinary Council 7 December 2020

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

APOLOGIES

 

OPENING OF MEETING WITH PRAYER

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT TO COUNTRY

 

NOTICE OF WEBCASTING OF MEETING

 

MATTERS RECOMMENDED BY THE GENERAL MANAGER TO BE CONSIDERED IN CLOSED COMMITTEE

 

Confidential Items

 

1.       Voluntary Acquisition - 194 River Road, Northwood

It is recommended that the Council close so much of the meeting to the public as provided for under Section 10A(2) (c) of the Local Government Act, 1993, on the grounds that the report contains information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business; it further being considered that discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to public interest by reason of the foregoing and discloses the valuation information in relation to the property purchase.. 

 

public forum

 

Members of the public may address the Council Meeting on any issue for 3 minutes.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

 

2.      ORDINARY COUNCIL MEETING - 16 NOVEMBER 2020

 

Orders Of The Day

 

Notices of Motion

 

3.       Notice of Motion - Rebuilding Council Ovals with Compost - EPA Case Study.............................................................................................................................. 5

 

4.       Notice of Motion - Installation of Mist Fans/Sprayers on Council Property..................................................................................................................... 10

 

Officer Reports for Determination

 

5.       Kingsford Smith Oval - Off-Leash Dog Use................................................. 11

 

6.       46-52 Nicholson Street and 57-67 Christie Street, St Leonards - Planning Proposal 38........................................................................................... 34

 

7.       St Leonards South - Revised Draft Section 7.11 Contributions Plan (re-exhibition)........................................................................................................... 48

 

8.       12f Skiff Club and Tantallon Pavilion Rebuilding Tenders............... 53

 

9.       Sustainability Small Grants - Round 20 - Greenwich Public School 56

 

10.     Ausgrid Community Solar Battery Project.............................................. 65

 

11.     Official Opening of The Canopy on 29 November 2020............................ 67

 

12.     The Canopy - Commendation Planning Institute of Australia (NSW) Awards for Planning Excellence 2020 ........................................................ 70

 

13.     Delegation of Authority During Christmas Recess.............................. 72

 

14.     Appointment of Audit Committee Member .................................................. 73

 

15.     "Your High Street" Grant - Longueville Road Paving........................... 76

 

16.     Lane Cove Bush Kids Highly Commended Recipient................................. 79

 

17.     Greening our City Grant .................................................................................... 82

 

18.     Traffic Committee - November 2020................................................................. 84

 

19.     Council Snapshot November 2020................................................................. 133  

 

 

 

 

                     


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 7 December 2020

Notice of Motion - Rebuilding Council Ovals with Compost - EPA Case Study

 

 

Subject:          Notice of Motion - Rebuilding Council Ovals with Compost - EPA Case Study    

Record No:    SU8090 - 72070/20

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):      Councillor Francis Vissel 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report highlights the Environment Protection Authority’s case study regarding compost turf management (AT-1) and recommends that Council ask Dr Mick Battam from environmental consultancy AgEnviro Solutions to speak at the February 2021 Workshop for Councillors about the proposed benefits of rebuilding council ovals with compost.                  

 

Background

 

One of the submissions on the Bob Campbell Oval Master Plan included a leaflet from the Environment Protection Authority (EPA) outlined in the leaflet, “Composted fields ready to swing into summer of sport” which refers to Rebuilding Council Ovals with Compost.

 

The EPA leaflet (AT-1) shows the success that is being experienced and I quote from the introductory page as follows:

 

Sports fields treated with compost survive the winter season ready for summer sport with minimal work. Optimal playing surfaces Compost can play a major role in turf management by improving the quality and longevity of sporting fields, a project has found. The project, delivered by environmental consultancy AgEnviro Solutions with a $350,000 grant from the NSW Environment Protection Authority’s (EPA) Organics Market Development program, assessed 408 fields identified through a partnership with NSW Football and Northern NSW Football. AgEnviro assessed each field’s soil type, sport usage levels, turf species, climate, microclimate and irrigation before recommending field treatments. The site-specific recommendations were then provided to the councils and associated soccer associations. Recommendations could include using compost as part of a field’s total reconstruction or using compost blends for topdressing and filling depressions. The results have been so successful that councils have requested another 150 fields be assessed for compost turf management.

Taking into account the environmental concerns raised by many in the community by the use of artificial turf and, keeping in mind the composting method is recent and not known to us before now, it could open up further opportunities to consider for natural grass sporting ovals. 

 

I contacted the Chief Soil Scientist at AgEnviro Solutions, Dr Mick Battam, and asked whether he would be willing to talk to Council about the above method at one of our workshops.  He said he would be glad to do so if invited.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council invite Dr. Mick Battam, Chief Soil Scientist from AgEnviro Solutions to speak at the February 2021 Councillors’ Workshop on the methods, experience and outcomes of the composting of Sporting Ovals.

 

 

Councillor Francis Vissel

Councillor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

EPA Leaflet on Case Study, Composting of Sporting Fields

2 Pages

 

 

 


ATTACHMENT 1

EPA Leaflet on Case Study, Composting of Sporting Fields

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 7 December 2020

Notice of Motion - Installation of Mist Fans/Sprayers on Council Property

 

 

Subject:          Notice of Motion - Installation of Mist Fans/Sprayers on Council Property    

Record No:    SU3474 - 72080/20

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):      Councillor Scott Bennison; Councillor David Brooks-Horn 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report seeks to develop a suitable policy with respect to our commercial leases that allows for the approval and installation of mist fans/sprayers on Council properties during the summer months.

 

Background

                                                              

I have had request from one of our tenants in the plaza to install commercial mist fans or sprayers on our structures for the summer periods in order to provide welcome relief for residents who use these structures.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council request that the General Manager:

1) Develop a policy with respect to our commercial leases that allows for the installation of mist      fans/sprayers on our property having regard to:

     a) process of application,

     b) who pays for the product and installation,

     c) responsibility of maintenance;

     d) make good

     e) other issues impacting the lease.

2) Notify the relevant tenancies of our new policy; and,

3) Delegate authority to the general manager to approve any applications.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor Scott Bennison

Councillor

 

 

 

Councillor David Brooks-Horn

Councillor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

   


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 7 December 2020

Kingsford Smith Oval - Off-Leash Dog Use

 

 

Subject:          Kingsford Smith Oval - Off-Leash Dog Use    

Record No:    SU1230 - 71238/20

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Martin Terescenko; Craig Wrightson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Kingsford Smith Oval plays host to third and fourth grade cricket in the second highest level of club cricket in Sydney and last year was voted by the players in the competition as the third best ground in Sydney. A fulltime groundskeeper is required at the oval, to provide a turf wicket for this level of competition. Over the years there has been a steady increase in dog related incidents at the oval and Council needs to provide a safe working environment for its staff.

 

At the March Council meeting it was resolved to trial opening and closing the gates daily during staff work hours. The trial commenced on 19 October 2020 and it was found that there was a reduction in dog related incidents, however there was still one dog attack recorded during this period.

 

It is proposed to:

·    Continue with the daily opening and closing of the gates during the Council staff work hours which are 6:30am to 3:30pm Monday to Friday.

·    Continue using the flag system for both entire oval bookings and cricket net bookings.

 

If dog related incidents continue to occur and it becomes apparent that the opening of the gates has not sufficiently addressed dog related incidents, the oval will be a designated an on-leash area during staff working hours.

 

Background

 

History of KSO

 

In November 1888, seven years before Lane Cove Council was proclaimed the oval now known as Kingsford Smith Oval, the Sydney Morning Herald recorded that it reported the opening of a Cricket Ground at the location. In December 1888 the land was purchased by Joseph Palmer, and in June 1894, he filed for bankruptcy and the land ownership transferred to City Bank of Sydney. In October 1899 it was proposed to subdivide land for housing and in February 1901 the land was purchased by NSW Government and gazetted as Longueville Park.

 

The oval is still used for cricket today and has a turf wicket that requires considerable staff labour hours to maintain. The oval hosts third and fourth grade cricket for the Sydney Shire’s Cricket competition which is the second highest level of club cricket in Sydney and last year was voted the third best ground in Sydney. A fulltime groundskeeper is employed at the oval to provide a turf wicket of this high standard.

 

Off-leash Dog Walking

 

Off-leash dog walking has been permitted at the oval for a considerable time. Even as far back as 2010 Council has received correspondence outlining issues with the dog walkers interrupting organised sport and training. In 2013 Council completely enclosed the oval with a new picket fence and gates. Since then the increase in dog walkers at the oval has reached a tipping point where now there is considerable stress on Council staff and other users of the oval.

In 2017 Council’s previous groundskeeper at the oval requested a transfer to Tantallon Oval due to the ongoing issues relating to dogs. Since then these issues have been steadily increasing. Over the past 2 years the current groundskeeper has recorded at least 24 incidents that have occurred at the oval. Council’s other staff who have the skill set to undertake the groundskeeper’s duties at the oval have stated that they would not be comfortable in taking over the duties there either.

 

It is apparent that by introducing the combination of totally enclosing the oval with a picket fence and off-leash dog walking, Council has unwittingly created an unsafe working environment for staff and other users.

 

Dog Related Issues

 

The Companion Animals Act sets certain responsibilities for dog owners and some of these are:

 

·    Section 12 – Dog to wear a collar and tag: A dog must have a collar around its neck and there must be attached to the collar a name tag that shows the name of the dog and the address or telephone number of the owner of the dog.

·    Section 13 – Responsibilities while in a public space: A dog that is in a public place must be under the effective control of some competent person by means of an adequate chain, cord or leash that is attached to the dog and that is being held by .…. the person.

Note: Just because a dog is not on a lead in an off-leash area, ….. does not mean that an offence ….. is not committed if the dog rushes at, attacks, bites, harasses or chases any person or animal, whether or not any injury is caused.

·    Section 16 – Offences where dog attacks person or animal:  If a dog rushes at, attacks, bites, harasses or chases any person ….. whether or not any injury is caused to the person or animal.

The issues that are occurring at the oval are generally caused by dog walkers not having control of their dogs or not paying attention to their dogs, as required by the Act. It has been observed the reoccurring issues are:

 

·    Dogs have rushed, attacked or tried to bite the groundskeeper.

·    Dogs are defecating on the oval and dog walkers are not always picking it up.

·    Prior to match days sporting groups have reported they can spend up to half an hour picking up dog excrement.

·    Dogs digging holes on the oval causing safety issues for sporting groups and other users.

·    Dog walkers leave their dog on the oval unsupervised whilst they supervise their children in the playground or go and get a coffee from the coffee van.

·    Dog walkers abusing the groundskeeper for leaving gates open while they are doing their job.

·    Dog walkers remaining on the oval when it has been booked for organised sport.

·    Dogs urinating on bags that are on the oval during cricket training.

·    Dogs urinating on the fencing around the cricket pitch.

·    Dog walkers allowing dogs to run across the cricket pitch when it is fenced off. 

·    Dog walkers not understanding that their dog’s behaviour may appear aggressive to people that are not familiar with the animal.

All of Council’s groundskeeper have undertaken Dog Awareness training to give them greater understanding of dog behaviours and how deal with them.

 

In February 2020 Council staff commenced a process to identify options to address the issues at the oval to improve workplace safety. A number of measures were considered, these included:-

 

·    Banning dogs from the oval when the groundskeeper is working.

·    Making the oval an on-leash area while the groundskeeper is working.

·    Removing the gates to force dog walkers to control their dogs.

·    Introducing a flag system on the oval to remove dog walkers when the field is booked or heavy machinery is on the oval.

 

Of the above measures the only two that would totally address the work, health and safety issues for Council staff would be to either ban dogs from the oval or make it an on-leash area while Council staff are onsite. It was decided the least disruptive option for dog walkers at the oval would be to remove the gates while still allowing off-leash dog walking and implement a flag system for when the oval could not be accessed.

 

Given the solution was a Safety issue, the level of consultation considered appropriate under Council’s consultation matrix was to inform the community of the proposed change. In February 2020, Council letterbox dropped surrounding residents and installed signs on the oval informing residents that the gates would be removed, and chicanes would be installed.

 

The Lane Cove Dog Lovers Association (LCDLA) was subsequently formed, and meetings were organised between the LCDLA, Councillors and Staff. At these meetings several options were discussed and the LCDLA put forward the option that the gates be opened and closed every weekday between the hours of 6:30am and 3:30pm. Council could not provide the resources to guarantee the gates could be consistently opened and closed at these times and the LCDLA offered to open the gates every weekday morning at 6:30am. It was further agreed that this arrangement would be trialled for a four-week period.

 

March Council Resolution

 

Prior to the March Council meeting the LCDLA changed the time that they were available to open the gates from 6:30am when the groundskeeper commences work on site to 7:30am. At the March Council meeting it was resolved to:

 

“1.    Undertake a trial to manage the Dog Leash Free Use of Kingsford Smith Oval as follows:-

 

a.      Chicanes be installed with gates;

b.      On Monday to Friday the gates are to be locked open between 7.30am and 3.30pm and be closed the remaining times;

c.      On Saturday and Sunday the gates be closed;

d.     Notwithstanding the above, when the oval is booked for a sporting match, dogs continue to be prohibited on the oval;

e.     The Lane Cove Dog Lovers Association (LCDLA) members shall be responsible for opening the chicane gates Monday to Friday at 7:30am during a 1 month trial, Council staff shall be responsible for closing them when they leave the oval at the end of their shift;

f.      When the cricket nets are booked (i.e. not the full field), dogs shall be restricted to the northern third of the field. Signs will be prominently placed to create an imaginary line to designate the area which shall be available for leash free use by dogs. Dogs will not be permitted on the remaining two thirds of the field when the cricket nets are in use;

g.     Large signs shall be placed in prominent positions outlining the above rules including fines for dogs chasing and other offences pursuant to the Companion Animals Regulations 2008;

 h.   Should the General Manager determine that in the interest of staff and/or public safety that the current arrangements are not working, then the General Manager prepare a report to Council for further consideration but immediately implement an alternative arrangement as discussed with community representatives that the gates be opened from Monday to Friday.

2.    A report be submitted to Council after the initial trial with the following information (including comparison data where available) to determine the success/non-success of the above strategies:-

 

a.     the reliability of the opening and closing of the gates;

b.     the number of reported instances where as a result of the unlocked gates on the chicanes there is injury to residents and/or their dogs;

c.     the number of confrontations between Council staff and dog owners,

d.     disruptions to hirers of the oval relating to dog use; and

e.    other information that the General Manager deems necessary to allows Council consideration of risk to staff and residents.

 3.   Prior to commencement of the trial, video equipment be installed with appropriate signage to allow review of reported incidents (no real time monitoring). For example, a 4 system Camera System is available for circa $2000 (See attachment 1), which could be funded by an adjustment to Council’s Budget at the next Budget Review.

 4.   During the initial 1-month trial period, Council investigate options for automation of the opening and closing of the gates and the information including costings be submitted with the report to Council. A possible solution could include two gates at each entrance one being automated (to be opened) and the other remain a manual self-closing gate.

 5.   The General Manager work with the Lane Cove Dog Lover Association to develop a Code of Practice for use of the Oval as a Dog Leash Free Area and identify options for promotion of it and means of ensuring compliance.

6.    During the initial 1 month trial period, Council further investigate temporary fencing options to provide the groundskeeper with a fully enclosed safe space to work on the oval.

7.    Council notes that LCDLA reserves the right to review its position taking into consideration Council’s findings and proposed solution after the one month trial.”

Discussion

 

At the May Council meeting items 4 and 6 from the March resolution were reported as follows:-

 

Item 4 from the March resolution – Gate Automation

 

An investigation has been undertaken to determine how to automate the gates and the quote to undertake these works totals $40,580. This proposal would leave three existing gates in their current location and provide three new automatic sliding gates further away from the surrounding roads with chicanes that point away from the roads. Separate gates are required due to the nature of automatic gates not being able to be opened manually.

 

By having the chicanes pointing away from the road when dogs or children leave the oval they would need to slow down and do a U-turn before they could run towards the road, improving safety.

 

To construct the automatic gate system 250m of electrical conduits and cabling will need to be installed to connect the gates to the nearest available power, located at the grandstand. The three automatic gates would operate on a timer.

 

Item 6 from the March resolution – Temporary Fencing

 

Council has investigated options for providing a movable fence that can be used to temporarily divide the oval into two zones for sports training and dog walking or separate the turf cricket wicket from the remainder of the oval. For this proposal to work it has been determined that the movable fence would need to be a minimum of 150m long. Council has researched multiple fencing options and unfortunately, due to the length of fence required there is no practical way of providing and storing a movable fence that can be used for this application.

 

The following actions were implemented in line with the March resolution.

 

Item 5 from the March resolution - Code of Conduct

 

A Code of Conduct was developed for the dog walkers at the oval. With the assistance of the LCDLA the voluntary “Kingsford Smith Oval Code of Conduct for Dog Carers and Their Dogs” was finalised in October. AT-1.

 

Items 1 and 3 from the March resolution - Trial to Manage Dog Leash Free Use

 

Chicanes were installed at three gates around the oval and solar powered video cameras were also installed to monitor these gates.

 

The LCDLA where notified on 7 October that the trial was to commence on 19 October to coincide with the start of the cricket season. The trial began as planned on Monday 19 October. On 9 October the LCDLA did not commence opening the gates on this date as they wanted to be covered by public liability insurance which they did not have. Council investigated possible options given the LCDLA is not a legal entity and ultimately identified that if they were enlisted as volunteers under Council’s direction it was possible to provide insurance. Six members of LCDLA took up this offer to sign up as Council volunteers and were inducted on 30 October. The LCDLA said they would only open the gates up to 18 November as their interpretation of the March resolution was that the trial of opening the gates should only go for one month. Council’s interpretation of the resolution was that the trial was to see if the LCDLA could consistently open the gates for one month to see if this was a viable option for opening the gates long term.

 

LCDLA members started opening the gates on 2 November and they opened the gates for 2 ½ weeks. It was noted that during the period the gates were opened by the LCDLA, on a number of occasions they were opened by people who hadn’t signed on as Council volunteers and therefore were not covered under Council’s insurance. Since 19 November Council staff have continued to open and close the gates.

 

Flag system:

 

The flag system for informing dog walkers that the oval is booked for sport commenced several weeks prior to the commencement of the opening of the gates. Council provided a number of large red flags to the cricket club. These flags have a graphic that informs the public that no dogs are permitted on the field.

 

 

 

 

Restricting dogs to northern end of oval during cricket net bookings:

 

In the first week of the trial additional signs were installed on the oval that inform users that when the cricket nets are booked for training, dogs are only permitted to use the northern third of the oval. The signs indicate an imaginary line that divides the oval into these two areas. The use of the cricket nets is notified by installing the red flags at the two gates at the southern end of the oval while the gates at the northern end have no flags.

 

Community Submissions

 

Since the commencement of the trial Council has received 65 submissions. These submissions included 51 against opening the gates, 2 for opening the gates and 11 in support of the new flag system.

 

The main issues raised in these submissions were:

 

Don’t agree with gates being opened: Raised in 51 submissions

The key issues raised were:-

•  Unsafe for Dogs when gates open

•  Unsafe for Children when gates open

•  Older / less mobile people need gates to have confidence / ability to release and retrieve dog

 

The option of opening the gates was chosen as it was believed to have the least impact on regular users whilst having the desired effect of reducing dog incidents. KSO is the only Council Oval that is completely enclosed, but all ovals allow some for off leash activity. There are no reports of safety issues arising from these arrangements in other parks. No safety incidents were recorded during the trial period. It is noted there is considerable video footage of owners arriving at the oval entry with the dog already off lead, indicating some confidence in the dog’s safety.

 

It is clear that a proportion of dog walkers are afraid that they cannot control their dogs when they are off-leash. Blackman Park some 3.9km away offers full enclosed leash free areas 24/7, if this is the situation facing the dog owner. Alternatively, owners can do more to train their dogs. As stated above, the Companion Animals Act 1998 requires dog walkers to have effective control of their animal whether it is on or off a leash.

 

At the July Council Meeting is was resolved to develop a Dog Friendly Strategy and as part of preliminary development of the strategy Council has engaged the services of a Dog Trainer to undertake several workshops with local dog walkers to see if they feel these sessions are helpful. The Dog Trainer specialises in greeting rituals, manners, socialisation and reading the body language of dogs. The training is for dogs but also the owners to help them understand their dogs. So far, Council has had positive feedback from these sessions. Depending on community feedback as part of the consultation process for the Dog Friendly Strategy it is hoped that these types of activities or events can become regular occurrences.

 

Concerns for children’s safety with open gates: Raised in 25 submissions

Kingsford Smith Oval is the only oval in the LGA that is totally enclosed, and Council has no issues at its other sports fields that are not completely fenced with children escaping.  There is no requirement for Council to provide totally fenced off sports fields for children’s safety.

 

Supporting flag system when machinery on oval or during cricket bookings: Raised in 21 submissions

There has been support for the new flag system from both the sporting groups and dog walkers. There have also been some requests to role the system out to other sports fields. Given the support Council will look to extend use of the flag system.

 

Recommending that no dogs be on the oval whilst work is in progress: Raised in 11 submissions

This is one of the measures that Council initially considered and provides the desired outcome for work, health and safety for Council staff. However, it is not apparent whether these residents understand that the groundskeeper works at the oval from 6:30am to 3:30pm on weekdays and if this measure was implemented they would not be able to walk their dogs there during these times.

 

Support for Cameras: 3 submissions

As resolved by Council, the camera system installed is a basic solar powered system that is not completely reliable. However, it has been beneficial for monitoring the opening and closing of the gates.

 

Council is exposed to litigation due to the gates being opened: 2 submissions

The submissions suggest that Council will be open to litigation if a dog or child gets injured after running out of the open gates. There is no requirement for Council to provide totally enclosed sports fields. When the gates are open users will need to enter the oval through the gates and they will be aware that they are open. It is the individual user’s responsibility to take any precautions necessary based on their surroundings.

 

The groundskeeper does not like dogs and should be replaced: 3 submissions

The current groundskeeper has had a similar experience to the previous groundskeeper who requested a transfer away from the oval. A groundskeeper is employed at the oval to maintain and prepare the oval for cricket in the summer season and soccer in the winter season. It takes many hours to prepare and maintain turf cricket wickets and during the cricket season the groundskeeper is at the oval Monday to Friday from 6:30am to 3:30pm. It is not the groundskeeper’s responsibility to manage dog walkers or their dogs. Council allows the area to be used for off-leash dog walking when it is not booked but due to the number of dog walkers at the oval the groundskeeper is finding it difficult to undertake their duties.

 

The gates should be left open: 2 submissions

These residents are supportive of opening the gates as it does not affect their off leash dog walking activities. They have both stated that many locals are happy with the gates being opened and don’t think it is a major imposition.

 

Trial Results

 

Opening the gates:

To date the gates have been opened at the oval for a total of six weeks. This period coincided with the first six weeks of the cricket season when the groundskeeper is onsite daily between 6:30am and 3:30pm.

 

During the trial there has been a reduction in the attendance of uncontrolled dogs and it has been noted that new dog walkers have started to come to the oval.  Staff have also noticed a reduction in dog excrement and holes dug by dogs. All these factors have led to an improvement of the working conditions for Council staff. However, during the trial staff have been confronted on several occasions by dog walkers who do not agree with the current arrangements. On average this has occurred twice per week.

 

Video surveillance has shown that many dog walkers have walked in and out of the chicanes with dogs off a lead which seems to be contradictory to the claim that the oval is unsafe for dogs without gates. There were no reported/verified incidents involving dogs or children during the trial period.

 

On 20 November Council’s Ranger was attacked by a dog whilst opening the gates. This dog could not be controlled by its owner when it was attacking the Ranger and the Ranger was forced to defend himself. This incident reinforces that opening the gates has not eliminated the work, health and safety risk all together.

 

Over the course of the trial the gates were generally opened and closed at the correct times. However, due to resourcing constraints there were occasions when the gates were opened or closed later then the posted times.  If the daily opening and closing of the gates is to continue for an extended period Council cannot guarantee that the gates can be opened and closed at the correct times.

 

Flag system for sport and maintenance:

The cricket club has been putting the flags up for their training and match days. There have been a few issues with timing but the cricket club and oval users have generally been positive about the flag system.

 

Overall the flag system is working well for sports bookings and there have been requests to introduce this system to other ovals.

 

Council maintenance staff have also used the flag system to remove dogs from the oval when heavy machinery is required. There have been a number of instances where dog walkers have refused to leave and wanted to have a heated discussion about the matter.

 

Council staff should not be forced to deal with angry dog walkers when they are trying to undertake their duties. Staff should not have anxiety or be worried about the fact that a dog walker is going to confront them when they need to clear the oval to undertake maintenance works. This behaviour is unacceptable and if it continues it will ultimately require further measures to ensure it does not occur to ensure safety in the workplace, such as prohibiting dogs during working hours. It is hoped that this will not be necessary as community acceptance of the compromise that is in place is understood and accepted.

 

Flag system and signage for cricket net bookings:

The cricket club has been using this system for over four weeks and it appears that it has also had a positive impact at the oval. There have been some teething issues with the sporting clubs timing and notification but as the community gets used to the new system these issues should be resolved.

 

Context for Decision Making Going Forward

 

While for users of the off-leash area it is a recreation activity, typically for a short period of time, for the groundskeeper it is a workplace, for more than 7 hours a day.

 

The NSW Work Health and Safety Act 2011 sets responsibilities for employers, including (emphasis added):

 

·    Section 19 – Primary duty of care:

(1)  A person conducting a business or undertaking must ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the health and safety of

(a)  workers engaged, or caused to be engaged by the person, and

 

·    Section 5 – Meaning of “person conducting a business or undertaking”:

(1)  For the purposes of this Act, a person conducts a business or undertaking—

……

(5)  An elected member of a local authority does not in that capacity conduct a business or undertaking.

 

·    Section 7 – Management of risks: A duty imposed on a person to ensure health and safety requires the person—

(a)  to eliminate risks to health and safety, so far as is reasonably practicable, and

(b)  if it is not reasonably practicable to eliminate risks to health and safety, to minimise those risks so far as is reasonably practicable.

 

·    Section 8 – What is “reasonably practicable” in ensuring health and safety:

In this Act, reasonably practicable, in relation to a duty to ensure health and safety, means that which is, or was at a particular time, reasonably able to be done in relation to ensuring health and safety, taking into account and weighing up all relevant matters including—

(a)  the likelihood of the hazard or the risk concerned occurring, and

(b)  the degree of harm that might result from the hazard or the risk, and

(c)  what the person concerned knows, or ought reasonably to know, about—

(i)  the hazard or the risk, and

(ii)  ways of eliminating or minimising the risk, and

(d)  the availability and suitability of ways to eliminate or minimise the risk, and

(e)  after assessing the extent of the risk and the available ways of eliminating or minimising the risk, the cost associated with available ways of eliminating or minimising the risk, including whether the cost is grossly disproportionate to the risk.

 

The Local Government Act, designates the General Manager as the employer, and therefore for the purposes of the NSW Work Health and Safety Act 2011, is the “person conducting a business”

 

·    Section 335 Functions of general manager

 

The general manager of a council has the following functions--

…..

(i) to direct and dismiss staff,

(j) to implement the council's workforce management strategy,

 

The requirements of the WH&S Act are therefore ultimately the responsibility of the General Manager. They cannot be transferred and are an individual responsibility.

 

Given the focus on evaluating and addressing risk under the NSW Work Health and Safety Act 2011 t, Council’s Workers Compensation insurer, StateCover Mutual were requested to undertake a risk assessment of the KSO workplace and the activities undertaken. During the assessment staff had to remove dog walkers from the oval so that heavy machinery could access the oval for maintenance. It was observed by the StateCover representative that a dog walker was disgruntled with being asked to leave the oval and he confronted and spoke inappropriately to the staff member. Unfortunately, this is an all to frequent, occurrence albeit from a small minority of people.

 

The StateCover report (AT-2) reaffirms that Council owes a duty of care to staff under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 to take reasonable care for their physical and psychological safety.

 

The report identified suggested controls that would cover all tasks and activities listed in this risk assessment and would lower the risk ratings to as low as reasonably practicable:

 

“1.          Between 7am and 3pm, Kingsford Smith Oval is made an on-leash dog exercise area.

a.    Before 7am and after 3pm when there are no council workers or when the oval is not booked for sport or training, dogs may be exercised off leash.

b.    Restricting dogs off leash time within the oval will allow for a safer work environment for council workers carrying out maintenance tasks, and it will also allow more users such as children, casual group fitness and runners to enjoy the oval.

 

2.           The relevant Lane Cove Council website page should be updated to state this or similar:

“Restrictions to dogs within the park apply during sporting games and at select times for high risk park maintenance activities”; and

“Members of the public are also advised to stay off the oval during high risk maintenance activities such as mowing and chemicals usage”

 

3.           Signage around the park is updated to reflect the changes.”

 

The recommendation is more onerous of park users than the current system used during the trial. Given the improvements experienced in the trial it is proposed to not implement the recommendations immediately. Further community education can be undertaken to improve understanding about the arrangements and the reason for them. Ultimately, the compromise needs to be embraced by the community, and there needs to be further improvement in user behaviour, in particular not verbally abusing staff in their workplace while implementing the arrangements. If there is no further improvement, then it will be necessary to implement the consultant’s recommendations to remove off-leash activities during working hours to ensure physical and psychological safety in the workplace.

 

Conclusion

 

Kingsford Smith Oval plays host to third and fourth grade club cricket in Sydney and last year was voted the third best ground in Sydney. A fulltime groundskeeper is required at the oval to provide a turf wicket for this level of competition. The high standard at which the oval and surrounds are maintained is part of the attractiveness of the space for dog walkers. Over the years there has been a steady increase in dog related incidents at the oval and this conflicts with Council’s obligation to provide a safe working environment.

 

The trial has shown that while the opening of the gates has improved the working conditions for Council staff, it has not eliminated them. At this stage it is proposed to continue with the daily opening and closing of the gates during the Council staff work hours which are 6:30am to 3:30pm Monday to Friday. While staff will endeavour to open and close the gates at these times it does not have the resources to guarantee that they will always be able to meet these time constraints. The community still benefits under this option by having an enclosed leas-free area when the oval is not in use.

 

Unfortunately, often the actions of a small group impact on the broader group. In the case of KSO, over the last number of years the dog related issues have deteriorated, not improved, which led Council staff to reluctantly seek changes. Ultimately, this current compromise solution needs to be embraced by the community, and further improvement in user behaviour, is required, including not verbally abusing staff in their workplace. If there is no further improvement, then it will be necessary to implement on-leash access during working hours to ensure physical and psychological safety in the workplace.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council note:-

 

1.    Under the Work, Health and Safety Act 2011, the work, health and safety of staff is the responsibility of the General Manager;

2.    StateCover, Council’s workers compensation insurer has reaffirmed that Council owes a duty of care to staff under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 to take reasonable care for their physical and psychological safety and recommends the oval be made an on-leash dog exercise area during staff working hours; and

3.    The General Manger, to ensure physical and psychological safety of staff in the workplace, will undertake the following course of action:

a.  Continue the opening and closing of the gates at Kingsford Smith Oval utilising Council staff during the staff work hours, 6:30am to 3:30pm Monday to Friday;

b.  Continue using the flag system at Kingsford Smith Oval for both entire oval bookings, cricket net bookings and selected maintenance works;

c.  Undertake further community education in relation to the arrangements at Kingsford Smith Oval, the reasons for them and encouraging further improvement in user behavior; and

d.  If dog related incidents continue to occur (including verbal abuse towards Council staff), then Kingsford Smith Oval will be designated an on-leash area during the staff working hours.

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Terescenko

Executive Manager - Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Kingsford Smith Oval Code of Conduct for Dog Carers and Their Dogs

4 Pages

 

AT‑2View

StateCover Risk Assessment Kingsford Smith Oval

9 Pages

 

 

 


ATTACHMENT 1

Kingsford Smith Oval Code of Conduct for Dog Carers and Their Dogs

 

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ATTACHMENT 2

StateCover Risk Assessment Kingsford Smith Oval

 

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Ordinary Council Meeting 7 December 2020

46-52 Nicholson Street and 57-67 Christie Street, St Leonards - Planning Proposal 38

 

 

Subject:          46-52 Nicholson Street and 57-67 Christie Street, St Leonards - Planning Proposal 38    

Record No:    SU8044 - 70375/20

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):      Lara Fusco 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The purpose of this report is to consider the planning merits for land at 46-52 Nicholson Street and 57-67 Christie Street, St Leonards to redevelop the site as a commercial office building.

 

The Proposal currently seeks to retain the existing B3 Commercial Core zoning with an increase in floor space ratio and height to permit a single 32-storey commercial office tower development. The proponent-led Planning Proposal seeks the following amendments to Lane Cove Local Environmental Plan 2009:

 

·          Increase the FSR controls from 4.5:1 to 16.45:1; and

·          Introduce a solar height plane control to avoid shadowing of Newlands Park to control building height.

 

It is important to note that this Proposal was lodged prior to the release of the final St Leonards and Crows Nest 2036 Plan in August 2020. The applicant has provided an updated analysis to respond to the final plan, which is attached.

 

Council has provided an alternative building envelope to mitigate concerns regarding loss of district and iconic views due to the proposed height and bulk of the applicant’s proposal.

 

It is recommended that Council forward the amendments of Planning Proposal No. 38 to the Local Planning Panel for advice and the General Manger be given delegation to forward the proposal to the Minister for a Gateway Determination.

 

 

Background

 

Site

 

The site is located at 46-52 Nicholson Street and 59-67 Christie Street, St Leonards (refer to Figure 1).

 

Figure 1: Location of proposal

 

The site contains six commercial buildings ranging in height from two to four storeys, which are reaching the end of their economic lifespan, are in poor repair and in some cases unusable. The eight lots have been combined under a single landholding ownership.

 

Sites to the north and south side of the Pacific Highway have been principally redeveloped with larger mixed-use buildings, and several underdeveloped properties are subject to development consent. Further north of the site is ‘The Forum’ which forms a town centre of St Leonards and acts as a commercial, retailing and transport hub.

 

Current Planning Controls

 

The current planning controls for the site are as follows:

 

Zoning

 

Site Area

 

Current FSR

 

Possible GFA

 

Height Limit

B3 Commercial Core

 

2,300 sqm (proposal)

 

4.5:1

 

10,350 sqm

 

25 m (6-7 storeys)

 

Lot 11 in DP 654462; Lots A & B in DP 334878; Lot 2 in DP 945933; Lot 2 in DP 528060; Lot 1 in DP 9409064; SP54127; and SP18047

 

Table 1: Current Planning Controls

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strategic planning context in St Leonards

 

In pursuing the revitalization of the St Leonards CBD, Council has taken a measured approach by targeting specific sites to stimulate and broaden the economic base, by permitting a small number of mixed use (B4) sites within the CBD as a whole. The remainder of the sites were to remain as B3 Commercial Core. This approach has been implemented since 2012, through Council’s:-

 

1.         Four Pilot projects;

2.         Proposed Rail Plaza; and

3.         St Leonards Public Domain Master Plan.

 

This targeted approach, with supporting projects, is a finely tuned policy designed to stimulate the centre’s long-term commercial and employment potential with residential development only providing a supporting role in the St Leonards CBD. Council is firmly of the view that further residential land uses should only be considered after the 4 pilot projects have been evaluated to gauge impacts and benefits to the Commercial Core.

 

While this Planning Proposal in principle validates Council’s approach, there are now other (finalised) strategic planning documents to consider.

 

The Greater Sydney Region Plan, A Metropolis of Three Cities, and the North District Plan

 

Both A Metropolis of Three Cities and the North District Plan (NDP) identify St Leonards as a ‘strategic centre’. The District Plan considers that the strategic centres play an important economic role in supporting the growth of Sydney as a global city such as the health and education (employment) ‘super precinct’ (page 60).

 

Council must assess this planning proposal against Planning Priorities N9 & N10 and Action 34 of the District Plan, in regards to St Leonards.

 

Planning Priority N9: Growing and investing in health and education precincts

 

Page 64 reinforcesthe importance of the precinct as a key employment centre in Greater Sydney”. Action 34, a Productivity Action, is primarily focused on additional employment capacity by growing jobs. In particular, a higher jobs target of an extra 16,400 jobs identified by 2036.

 

This Proposal states that it would realise 3,430 additional jobs (21%) of the total employment potential of the strategic centre of St Leonards Crows Nest. Medical office suites are also proposed to be delivered at the lower levels of the building. This would further support the health and education precinct of St Leonards and Royal North Shore Hospital.

 

Planning Priority N10: Growing investment, business opportunities and jobs in strategic centres

 

Page 67 of the NDP reinforces that, “the growth, innovation and evolution of centres will underpin the economy of the North District.”

 

The Proposal is consistent with the central objective of supporting an employment hub, such as St Leonards, that can provide 16,400 additional jobs over the next 20 years. If combined with Council’s ‘pilot project’ sites, approximately 4,691 additional jobs will be created in the Lane Cove portion of St Leonards. This would be counted towards the high jobs target for the area.

St Leonards and Crows Nest 2036 Plan

 

The St Leonards/Crows Nest Planned Precinct is identified by the North District Plan (NDP) as “a mixed-use centre with high-rise offices, and high-density residential development”. Action 34 of the NDP focuses growth subject to “growing jobs in the centre”. Additional capacity for housing supply is a secondary but important function of the precinct. It is from these two purposes of the North District Plan that the 2036 Plan has emerged.

 

The NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE) released the Draft St Leonards Crows Nest 2036 Plan (2036 Plan) and supporting documents in October 2018.

 

The final 2036 Plan for the area was released by DPIE on 29 August 2020; it states that this site remain as B3 Commercial Core with an increased height and floor space ratio. The 2036 Plan also introduced a Special Infrastructure Contributions rate to apply to all new residential and mixed-use residential development in the area.

 

It is important to note that page 63 of the final 2036 Plan states that all controls shown in the ‘Implementing the Plan’ section are indicative only. Further, on page 76:

 

“Planning Proposals may be inconsistent with the Plan if it can be demonstrated to the Secretary of the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment that the inconsistency is of minor significance while still achieving the vision, objectives and actions identified in the Plan”.

 

Special Infrastructure Contributions

 

The Special Infrastructure Contribution (SIC) is to apply to this area of St Leonards and Crows Nest as part of the finalised 2036 Plan. However, because this site is proposed to be a commercial office building, the SIC would not apply to this site.

 

Local Planning Panel

 

Ordinarily, a planning proposal will be referred to the Local Planning Panel for advice prior to Council’s resolution. Given scheduling availability, Council has not been able to seek or receive advice from the Local Planning Panel for the proposal by the end of this year (prior to the Ordinary Meeting of Council in December). Notwithstanding, the proposal has been scheduled for the Local Planning Panel meeting on 17 December 2020.

 

Council’s report to the Panel will discuss the proponent’s compliance with the relevant strategic planning documents as well as urban design, environmental, economic, and social considerations for their proposal.

 

It is therefore recommended that upon receiving Local Planning Panel report for the preferred option, the General Manager seek Gateway Determination by a resolution of Council.

 

PROPOSAL

 

The proponent-led Planning Proposal (see AT-1 and AT-2) seeks the following amendments to Lane Cove LEP 2009:

·          Increase the FSR controls from 4.5:1 to 16.45:1 (see AT-6); and

·          Introduce a solar height plane control to avoid shadowing of Newlands Park to control building height.*

 

* Height of building only to be defined by wording that: “the development does not result in any additional overshadowing on the land shown with blue hatching as ‘Newlands Park’– between 10.00am and 3.00pm on 21 June in each year”.

 

Overall, the proposed controls could potentially result in the following outcomes:

·          A 32-storey commercial office building with ground floor retail and top two levels as plant. The site comprises a total Gross Floor Area of 37,842 sqm to increase in employment (jobs) to meet North District Plan high jobs target (see AT-5);

·          Three levels of basement car parking with capacity for 122 car spaces with access from Christie Street (see AT-4);

·          Public domain improvements including an activated ground floor with public open space on the corner of Christie Street and Nicholson Street, and public through-site link from Christie Street to Nicholson Street; and

·          Roof top garden terraces, and above-ground balconies (up to Level 27);

·          Capacity to achieve a 6 star-green energy and NABERS rated building (see AT-7); and

·          Minimal overshadowing of Newlands Park through the built form and articulation of the building (see AT-9, AT-10 and AT-11)

 

A Voluntary Planning Agreement (VPA) letter of offer (see AT-8) was also submitted. However, Council’s policy is that any VPA be assessed separately at a later stage to ensure that any Planning Proposal is considered on its own merits.

 

 

CURRENT LEP CONTROLS

2036 PLAN

PROPOSAL 

Zoning

B3 Commercial Core

B3 Commercial Core

Retain zoning

FSR

4.5:1

(commercial)

15:1

(indicative)

15.96:1

(commercial)

0.49:1

(retail)

16.45:1 (Total)

Gross Floor Area

10,350 sqm

(commercial)

34,500 sqm

(indicative)

36,693 sqm (commercial)

1,149 sqm (retail)

37,842 sqm (Total)

Height

25 metres

(6-7 storeys)

30 levels/storeys - indicative

(no height shown in metres or RL)

Solar height plane control (to Newlands Park) but proponent’s plans show RL 198.6m

(32 storeys)

Parking Spaces

367

(based on Council’s parking controls)

No control, but action to “limit the amount of car parking provided for new developments”.

122

 

Table 2: Current and Proposed Planning Controls

 

 

Figure 3: Proposed section and roof plan.

 

 

Figure 4: Sketch of proposal.

 

 

Discussion

 

Considerations of the proposal

 

Council’s assessment of the applicant’s proposal has highlighted issues of consideration. Each matter has been assessed below.

 

1.         Height & FSR above 2036 Plan

 

The proposed height of the building is 32 storeys, which is two storeys higher than the 2036 indicative height. Similarly, the proposed FSR is 16.45:1 which is 1.45:1 above the 15:1 of the 2036 Plan.

 

Additionally, the 3m ground level setback and 4 storey street wall height, which are consistent with the 2036 Plan, create an undesirable built form in terms of bulk and scale.

 

Comment:

 

Notwithstanding the proposal’s compliance with the 2036 Plan for setbacks and street wall heights, variations to the indicative FSR and height in storeys is not supportable from an amenity perspective.

 

Modifications to the height, FSR and setbacks of the proposal were investigated by Council and are addressed elsewhere in this report (refer to Amended proposal – Architectus).

 

 

2.         Uncertain height defined by solar impact on Newlands Park

 

The proposal seeks to define height in terms of a solar height plane to Newlands Park where no shadow falls on Newlands Park between 10.00am-3.00pm on 21 June. This is a requirement of the Draft 2036 Plan.

 

Comment:

 

This is no longer a requirement of the final 2036 Plan. One of the new actions on page 33 of the 2036 Plan states that new development must:

 

Minimise overshadowing of key open spaces, public places and adjoining residential areas. Solar height planes should be adhered to as indicated within the Solar Access Map” (page 33 of 2036 Plan).

 

When read in conjunction with the solar access map (on page 38 of the Plan), it is made clear that any new building must seek to ‘minimise overshadowing of key open spaces’ between the hours of 10am – 3pm (mid-winter), in this case Newlands Park.

 

Notwithstanding that, shadow modelling in Figure 7 shows that the proposed building will not overshadow Newlands Park at all after 10am mid-winter. Therefore, the proposed LEP height control in the Planning Proposal is no longer applicable or consistent with the action of the final 2036 Plan.

 

An RL, as seen in the applicant’s proposal (RL 198.6 metres) and/or equivalent height in metres gives assurance of height to adjoining land owners. Based on the above, the definition of height in terms of a solar height plane is uncertain and unnecessary in this Planning Proposal due to a new action in the final 2036 Plan.

 

Figure 7: Shadow modelling at 10am

 

3.         District views from residential neighbours impacted

 

Impacts on district views, including iconic views to the Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Sydney CBD, are addressed in the Urban Design Report (AT-2), and View Impact Assessment (AT-3).

 

The impacts are measured from the nearby residential towers at 472, 486 (Mirvac development) and 504 (Landmark development) Pacific Highway, St Leonards. These buildings are within the line-of-sight of this Proposal. Views are from apartments between the far west and far east.

 

Comment:

 

In summary:

Height of top of the building

(in RL metres)

No. of storeys

46 Nicholson Street

Proposal

 

(RL 198.6; 32 storeys)

Council’s preferred option for 46 Nicholson Street

(RL 175.2; 26 storeys)

(Mirvac) Rear Tower

RL 204.46

35 levels + roof and plant

Approximately 2 storeys of unimpeded views

Approximately 9 storeys of unimpeded views

(Mirvac) Front Tower

RL 180.46

27 levels + roof and plant

Minimal impact

Minimal impact

504 Pacific Hwy (Landmark)

RL 227.4

43 storeys

Approximately 9 storeys of unimpeded views

17 storeys of unimpeded views

88 Christie St (JQZ)

RL 227.31

47 storeys

Approximately 15 storeys of unimpeded views

21 storeys of unimpeded views

 

Table 3: District view loss

 

It is anticipated that view sharing is to be expected from residential use in a CBD as views may be lost. District view loss occurs from 486 (Mirvac) and 504 (Landmark) Pacific Highway. View sharing is to be expected from residential use in a central business district, where residential use is ancillary to the commercial function of the precinct.

 

 

4.         Christie Street park overshadowed till approx. 1.30pm

 

The 2036 Plan requires development to avoid “substantial additional overshadowing” of Newlands Park & the new St Leonards South park from 10am-3pm. This does not apply to Christie Street Park (see figure 8).

 

Comment:

 

Shadow modelling provided by the applicant demonstrates that the Christie Street Park (south end) would experience overshadowing until approx. 1.30pm.  

 

Although the park would be protected under Council’s current 25 metre height limit, the 30 levels stated in the 2036 Plan and this proposal would significantly overshadow Christie Street park. Notwithstanding, the park still retains solar access due to the alignment of Christie Street, which is north facing.

 

The proposed development would need to be approximately half its current height to result in any reduction in overshadowing of the park. This is an onerous requirement of a commercial building in a Commercial Core zone and is against the intent, objectives and actions of the 2036 Plan.

 

Figure 8: Christie Street Park

 

5.         Overshadowing of adjacent residential properties

 

The 2036 Plan requires that development “Minimise overshadowing of … adjoining residential areas.” The solar access map states that this applies to “residential areas inside the boundary (for at least 2 hours)”.

 

Comment:

 

The proponent’s shadow modelling is contained on pages 64-71 (in AT-2). It highlights that in:

 

·          Lithgow Street residential (Northmark/Shoremark) – shadow gone by 12:15 pm. Additional shading is very similar to 2036 Plan potential shadowing.

 

·          Duntroon Ave – shadow gone by 12:30am.

·          Canberra Ave – shadow gone by 9:30am.

 

At between 5.5 hours sunlight and 2.75 hours sunlight midwinter, these are considered acceptable levels of solar access as defined by the final 2036 Plan and Apartment Design Guide. However, it is important to note that this is a commercial office building and the same standards (as defined in the Apartment Design Guide) do not necessarily apply to this site.

 

6.         Tree canopy cover

 

A tree canopy cover target of 25.7% has been identified for this ‘urban’ sub-precinct in the 2036 Plan. This matter, however, has not been addressed in the Planning Proposal or its documents by the applicant.

 

Comment:

 

In the 2036 Plan vision map, Nicholson Street is identified as a “tree-lined green street” while Christie Street is not. The objectives are to “incorporate new street trees to realise the tree canopy targets” but there are no related actions that apply to this site.

 

The proposed ground floor plan (Figure 9) shows that there is consistent street tree planting proposed along both street frontages (Nicholson and Christie Streets) but the exact amount of tree canopy cover has not been specified by the proponent.

 

However, there are no direct actions in the 2036 Plan on tree canopy cover which affect this site. Notwithstanding this, it appears that there is potentially enough space to accommodate increased tree planting if needed, based on the proposed ground floor plan.

 

 

Figure 9: Ground Floor Plan of proposal.

 

 

 

7.         Traffic and parking

 

The proponent’s traffic and transport study (AT-4) states that:

 

“… will not result in adverse impacts on the surrounding road network. All intersections retain an acceptable level of service during both the AM and PM peak hours, with no additional measures required to accommodate future traffic demands.” (p. 25).

 

Comment:

 

Parking is proposed for 122 bays which is lower than Council’s DCP Part R requirement of 367 spaces (see Table 2). This rate is much closer to the rate for North Sydney which uses 1 space/400m2 of GFA. Using this calculation, 92 parking spaces would be required.

This significantly reduced parking rate is consistent with the action of the 2036 Plan to “Limit the amount of car parking provided for new developments”.

 

The proponent’s traffic and transport study (AT-4) also outlines a Green Travel Plan with a suite of measures to reduce the need to travel and promotion of sustainable means of transport. This includes cycling, walking, public transport (St Leonards train station and Crows nest Metro), and carshare/carpooling. All of these measures are consistent with Part R of Council’s Development Control Plan and will assist in achieving the action of the 2036 Plan. Hence the impacts on the surrounding network are considered acceptable.

 

Entry to the basement is proposed off Christie Street (at the south-east end). Council’s DCP suggested off Nicholson (thereby forcing southbound arrivals to turn across Nicholson). By this route the proposed entry is a preferable solution.

 

Submissions

 

Whilst the proposal has not been publicly exhibited, approximately 44 submissions have been received at Council from neighbouring residential properties.

 

The largely pro forma structure of the submission raised concern primarily with the following:

1.         St Leonards Crows Nest 2036 Plan, including the increase in indicative heights from the Draft exhibited 2036 Plan, and a lack of consultation on the plan; and

2.         View loss by residences along the Pacific Highway and neighbouring residences in St Leonards.

 

Other issues raised by submissions included:

·         Lack of green space;

·         Traffic impacts, especially increases to the traffic network; 

·         Lack of public benefit to residential;

·         Uncertain demand for office space (post COVID-19 environment);

·         Overshadowing;

·         Built environment – FSR, height, setbacks;

·         Environmental impacts of development – i.e. wind tunnel effect;

·         Privacy and overlooking of the development into neighbouring residential.

 

The above issues have been addressed elsewhere in the report. It is noted that some of the issues raised by submissions overlap with Council's considerations, especially with regards to view loss and built envelope.

 

Amended proposal - Architectus

 

In response to the issues and concerns addressed above, Council sought external advice from planning firm Architectus to consider alternative built forms for the subject proposal (see AT-12). 

 

The alternative building envelope recommended for the proposal comprises the following:

·         26 storeys, with 24 office floors plus a plant level plus part rooftop plant;

·         15:1 FSR;

·         8 storey podium (street wall height) with 0m setback along Christie Street;

·         3m setback to Nicholson Street and southern boundary (rear); and

·         3m setback above podium.

 

The reduction in height responds to the concerns raised above, by minimising the impacts of over-looking and loss of district views to adjoining/neighbouring residences, as well as transitioning the height and bulk more appropriately to the surrounding context (see figure 10).

 

Figure 10: Heights and building envelopes with Council’s preferred proposal (26 storeys).

 

 

It is noted that this revised building envelope is not consistent with Council’s current DCP or the 2036 Plan for all setbacks. However, given the amendments to the height of the building, this approach provides a balanced position regarding setbacks between the applicant’s proposal, the 2036 plan and the DCP.

Applicant’s submission

 

On 1 December 2020, a submission was made by the applicant regarding the revised building envelope in Council’s preferred option for a reduced height and FSR, and modifications to the setbacks and wall street height. The applicant is accepting of a reduced FSR of 15:1 but does not support the reduced height of 26 storeys in Council’s preferred option, and seeks an additional 10% to the height (approximately 2-3 storeys). The applicant maintains that the additional height demonstrates a superior urban design outcome. However Council’s urban design analysis demonstrates that a reduced height minimises impacts of over-looking and loss of district views to adjoining/neighbouring residences, as well as transitioning the height and bulk more appropriately to the surrounding context. It is also worth noting that Council’s preferred option will also deliver A grade commercial office space.

 

The applicant will afforded a further opportunity to respond to Council’s preferred option at the December Local Planning Panel meeting.

 

Conclusion

 

The revised Proposal is considered to be consistent with both the Regional Plan and North District Plan as it will allow for a commercial office building to provide jobs which will contribute to the high jobs target for the area. The preferred option is also largely consistent with the vision, objectives and actions of the final St Leonards/Crows Nest 2036 Plan.

 

The land uses (commercial while accommodating pedestrian connectivity) of this Proposal is also consistent with Council’s Local Strategic Planning Statement Priorities and Actions as it would achieve a balance in the St Leonards Commercial area of residential and commercial development.

 

Modifications made to reduce the overall built form of the proposal provide the most balanced outcome in achieving the urban design principles, and mitigating concerns regarding view loss and privacy. Council’s preferred building envelope achieves a 15:1 FSR consistent with the 2036 Final Plan but at a lower height by 4 storeys which enables better view sharing with nearby residential neighbours and a better transition in building heights from surrounding lower scale residential areas to the highest buildings along Pacific Highway.

 

The preferred option appears to be a well-designed building that responds to and considers the likely interests and concerns of its neighbours as well as the stated future desired character of the CBD as expressed is the expectation for all development proposals.

 

Having regard to the above, it is recommended that an amended Planning Proposal No. 38 be forwarded to the Local Planning Panel for advice. Once the advice has been received, Council’s General Manager be given delegation to forward the Planning Proposal to the Minister for a Gateway Determination.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

1.         Support in principle an LEP amendment with a revised built form, with a reduced height of             26 storeys (RL 175.2), and FSR of 15:1.

2.         Note the amended proposal includes revised setbacks and street wall heights to Nicholson             Street, Christie Street and southern boundary;

3.         Seek advice on the Planning Proposal from the Local Planning Panel on 17 December             2020;

4.         Delegate authority to the General Manager, upon receiving the Local Planning Panel advice             from the Planning Proposal, to seek Gateway Determination from the Department of             Planning, Industry and Environment.

 

 

 

 

 

Mark  Brisby

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Planning Proposal Report

57 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑2View

Appendix A: Urban Design Report

79 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑3View

Appendix B: View Impact Assessment

24 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑4View

Appendix C: Traffic and Transport Assessment

39 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑5View

Appendix D: Economic Impact Assessment

29 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑6View

Appendix E: LEP Maps

2 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑7View

Appendix F: Sustainable Timber Construction

2 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑8View

Addendum information: Letter from Applicant

9 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑9View

Addendum information A - St Leonards Crows Nest Plan 2036 Comparison

9 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑10View

Addendum information B: Friedlander Place View Corridor

5 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑11View

Addendum information C - Christie Street Reserve Solar Study

4 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑12View

Urban Design Analysis - Architectus - 46 Nicholson Street

54 Pages

Available Electronically

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 7 December 2020

St Leonards South - Revised Draft Section 7.11 Contributions Plan (re-exhibition)

 

 

Subject:          St Leonards South - Revised Draft Section 7.11 Contributions Plan (re-exhibition)    

Record No:    SU6702 - 65557/20

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):      Terry Tredrea; Lara Fusco; Christopher Pelcz 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The purpose of this report is to outline the next steps to formalise the St Leonards South draft Section 7.11 Contributions Plan. The Section 7.11 Contributions Plan for the St Leonards South area has been amended to incorporate previous Council resolutions, legislative changes, finalisation of Planning Proposal 25 and supporting documents. Due to the nature of these changes it is recommended that Council re-exhibit the draft Section 7.11 Contributions Plan before it is submitted to the NSW Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal (IPART). As Council has determined to suspend the application of the existing Lane Cove Section 94 Contributions Plan, VPAs will be used in the interim for DAs submitted before the IPART adjustment is approved. Given the incentives have been adopted by Council, for administrative efficiency delegation is sought to exhibit the VPA and report to Council the results of the consultation.

 

Background

 

On 11 May 2020, Council resolved to amend and endorse Planning Proposal 25. As part of Council’s resolution it also resolved, interalia, the following:

 

“E.   Amend Planning Proposal 25, DCP and associated documents to reflect A, B, C and D above and submit the revised Planning Proposal 25 to the Minister for Planning and Public Spaces together with updated respective supporting reports and letters in relation to infrastructure support (e.g. Department of Education), being consistent with Council’s current position.

 

F.   Delegate Authority to the General Manager to update the draft s7.11 Plan having

regard to the amended Planning Proposal and seek approval from IPART for the Plan.

 

G.  Subject to Ministerial approval of Planning Proposal 25:-

a. commence the process to close Canberra Avenue, between River Road at its intersection with Duntroon Avenue to integrate the land into Newlands Park once the section 7.11 Plan funding has been confirmed.”

 

Following this, the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment finalised the St Leonards and Crows Nest 2036 Plan on 29 August 2020.

 

The area now has a Special Infrastructure Contributions (SIC) levy of $15,100 per additional new dwelling to be implemented at the Development Application stage. It is important to note that the SIC does not affect Council’s Section 7.11 Contributions Plan because it will not collect funds for the same infrastructure items.

 

Council’s Planning Proposal was gazetted on 31 August 2020 and took effect from 1 November.

 

Further, on 19 October 2020, Council resolved to:

 

1.   Receive a report at the November 2020 meeting on the amended Section 7.11 Contributions Plan for the St Leonards South Residential Precinct, prior to being re-exhibited

 

Staff and Council’s consultants have amended the draft Section 7.11 Contribution Plan to reflect Council’s 11 May 2020 resolution. However, having regard to the amendments by Council, the amended Draft Section 7.11 Contributions Plan (see AT-1) must be re-notified before being formally considered and endorsed by Council.

 

Discussion

 

Council’s draft Section 7.11 Contributions Plan must be amended to take into account:

·    The 11 May 2020 Council report and resolution on St Leonards South,

·    Legislative changes to the NSW Environmental Planning and Assessment Act in 2018, and

·    Finalised Planning Proposal 25 (LEP amendment 25), Development Control Plan and Landscape Master Plan.

 

The draft Section 7.11 Contributions Plan:

·    Does not include the widening of River Road footpath – this is to be investigated separately with NSW Roads and Maritime Services;

·    Does not include the new road between Park and Berry Roads – this is to be provided by the developer via the LEP bonus mechanisms;

·    Includes the proposed partial road closure of Canberra Avenue at this stage – for costing purposes only (including landscape works);

·    Includes pedestrian/cyclist works including shared use pathways and footpaths;

·    Proposes increased contribution rates, due to decreased number of dwellings; and

·    Includes Consumer Price Index (CPI) and Established House Price Index for Sydney to adjust rates set out in the plan to reflect quarterly movements in the value of land acquisition and works.

·    Has regard to the reduced dwelling yield, 2400 to 1974 dwellings and 20/20/20 dwelling mix when the LEP was finalised.

 

Previously Exhibited Draft s7.11 Contribution Rates (2017)

 


 

 

 

 

Updated Draft s7.11 Contribution Rates

 

The following table is the summarised contribution rates from the revised Section 7.11 Contributions Plan (see AT-1).

 

The following provides a comparison between the original draft Plan and new Draft Plan, for Essential and Nonessential works combined.

 

Net

Original Draft

% Diff

New Draft

Total with SIC

1 Bedroom

$17,298

+8%

$18,667

$33,767

2 Bedroom

$24,711

+8%

$26,667

$41,767

3 Bedroom

$38,302

+8%

$41,334

$56,434

Total to be collected

$53,741,013

-10%

$48,376,957*

*incl. admin. costs

 

It is recommended that Council re-exhibit and consider submissions regarding the draft Section 7.11 Contributions Plan before submitting it to IPART for final approval. This would not affect the General Manager’s delegation issued on 11 May 2020.

 

Community Consultation

 

Statement of Intent

 

The consultation is designed to obtain community feedback on the Draft Section 7.11 Contributions Plan. Any comments received will be reviewed and considered to help refine the plan’s content, before being forwarded to the NSW Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal (IPART).

 

 

Method

 

Level of Participation

Inform

Inform

Consult

Form of Participation

Open

Targeted

Open

Target Audience

Lane Cove Community and community groups

Government Agencies, and affected property owners

Lane Cove Community and community groups

Proposed Medium

eNewsletter and social media

Notification Letters

Website Exhibition and Survey

Indicative Timing

December 2020 – February 2021

December 2020 – February 2021

December 2020 – February 2021

 

Suspension of s7.11 Contributions

 

Council has resolved to suspend the application of the existing Lane Cove Section 94 Contributions Plan (August 1996) to the St Leonards South area pending the new Section 7.11 Contributions Plan being adopted. During the suspension period it is proposed to utilise the VPA process to seek a contribution equivalent to that being sort through the IPART process as an offset against the s7.11 contribution requirement. The VPA would confirm the existing incentives outlined in the LEP and DCP, No additional considerations would be available. Given these incentives have previously been determined by Council, delegation is sought to allow such VPAs to be exhibited with any Development Application. A report would be presented to Council with the results of the consultation for consideration prior to determination of the Development Application.

 

Conclusion

 

Council’s draft Section 7.11 Contributions Plan for the St Leonards South precinct has been amended to respond to Council’s resolution, legislative changes, and finalisation of other strategic planning documents.

 

Due to the nature of the changes it is recommended that Council re-exhibit the draft Section 7.11 Contributions Plan before it is submitted to NSW Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal (IPART) for assessment.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

 

1.   Publicly exhibit the amended Section 7.11 Contributions Plan for the St Leonards South area, as stated in the Consultation Strategy in this report;

 

2.   A further report be submitted to Council on the results of the consultation process; and

 

3.   Council, delegate authority to the General Manager to exhibit for 42 days, with any Development Application for the St Leonards South precinct to include a VPA whose incentives accord with Council’s previously adopted incentives contained in the DCP for each Area, and a report be submitted to Council with the results of the consultation for consideration prior to determination of that Development Application.

 

 

Mark  Brisby

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Revised St Leonards South S7.11 Plan

47 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑2View

Estimates - St Leonards South S7.11

20 Pages

Available Electronically

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 7 December 2020

12f Skiff Club and Tantallon Pavilion Rebuilding Tenders

 

 

Subject:          12f Skiff Club and Tantallon Pavilion Rebuilding Tenders    

Record No:    SU7201 - 70394/20

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):      Sebastian Stivala; Jane Gornall 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council has called tenders from suitably qualified contractors in accordance with Council’s Tender and Quotation Procedure for :-

 

-     Construction of the Aquatic Park Skiff and Public Storage and Access Facility, Stuart Street Longueville, NSW 2066 (Full details can be found on Councils Website) and,

 

-     Demolition of the current grandstand and changerooms at Tantallon Oval and building of a new Pavilion – incorporating new changerooms, viewing area, community room and disabled access.

 

Due to timing constraints, specifically the return of tender’s late December 2020, this report calls for the tender assessment and award to be undertaken under delegated authority of the General Manager to ensure continuity and efficiency of the procurement process and assist in meeting project specific timelines.

 

Discussion

 

The General Manager’s current delegation provides for the General Manager to call and accept tenders subject to the following limitation “The acceptance of tenders which will have significance to the Lane Cove Community”.

 

The two tenders outlined involve community facilities and so are deemed to be of significance. Due to the approaching Christmas recess, delegation is being sought to accept the tenders, to ensure the projects are not unnecessarily delayed.

 

Aquatic Park Skiff and Public Storage and Access Facility

 

In September 2018 fire destroyed several Lane Cove Council structures within the Aquatic Park Longueville that was utilised by the Lane Cove 12” Skiff Club and the community, which includes public access to Sydney’s foreshores for small recreational boating and passive recreation. Demolition of the dilapidated structure was completed (including piles) in March 2019. User groups have bene operating out of temporary structures since.

 

The tender calls for the reinstatement and upgrade of the Lane Cove Aquatic Park, Skiff and Public Storage and Access Facility. This project is being delivered by Council from insurance proceeds and incorporating grant funding under the NSW Government’s Transport (MIDO) program.

 

The proposal provides increased decking, storage, boat shed and dinghy storage as well as improved access to the foreshore. Council, in consultation with the Lane Cove Skiff Club has prepared a brief and preliminary design documentation to reinstate and deliver a Skiff Boat Storage and Public Access facility incorporating improved waterfront access to the Aquatic Park.

 

Following tender assessment and evaluation given the unique nature of the works it is anticipated that an award may be subject to post tender negotiations to achieve a value outcome for Council. Should an agreement be reached the General Manager would award the contract under delegated authority.

 

Programme - Aquatic Park Skiff and Public Storage and Access Facility

Tender Open

13 November 2020

Tender Close

11 December 2020

Contract Award

December/ Jan 2020/21

Construction (Potential Early Works Feb 2021) Start 1 April - Finish September 2021.

 

Tantallon Pavilion Rebuilding Tenders

 

Demolition of the current grandstand and changerooms at Tantallon Oval and building of a new Pavilion – incorporating new changerooms, viewing area, community room and disabled access.

 

The current grandstand and changerooms at Tantallon Oval have reached the end of their life. Council did submit a Development Application for the replacement of the building in late 2016 which was approved after the submission of a Management Plan in 2018. Subsequently Council obtained quotations for the works and found that the cost was prohibitive. 

 

Council has since had the building redesigned including making the building one level, thus removing the need for a lift and simplifying in the roof structure amongst other minor changes.

 

Programme - Tantallon Pavilion Rebuilding Tenders

Tender advertised

October 19, 2020

Tender closed

November 24, 2020

Assessment of tenders – Including interviews with shortlisted tenderers and financial checks

November 24 – December 11, 2020

Contract awarded

Late December 2020

Indicative build time

26-30 weeks

 

As can be seen from the table above, the tender for Tantallon Oval rebuild has closed.  Twelve tenders were received. There is a significant variance in the pricing between the tenderers and all are over the funds that are currently available for the project.

 

Funding for the rebuild is coming from several sources – Council’s funds allocated in the 20/21 budget for this purpose; contributions from the clubs that use the facility and also from NSW Stronger Community funding.  The NSW Stronger Community funds of just over $450,000 are required to be committed by the end of 2020.

 

Further in-depth analysis of the tenders is required and could not be completed before the December Council meeting. It is likely that all tenders will ultimately be rejected and negotiations with short-listed tenderers occur to achieve pricing within budget. Should agreement be reached the General Manager would award the contract under delegated authority.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council delegate authority to the General Manager to accept the tenders and enter into contracts for the following projects:-

 

a.  Construction of the Aquatic Park Skiff and Public Storage and Access Facility; and

b.  Demolition of the current grandstand and changerooms at Tantallon Oval and building of a new Pavilion – incorporating new changerooms, viewing area, community room and disabled access.

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 7 December 2020

Sustainability Small Grants - Round 20 - Greenwich Public School

 

 

Subject:          Sustainability Small Grants - Round 20 - Greenwich Public School    

Record No:    SU7913 - 70062/20

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):      Fiona McCleary 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Applications for Round 20 of the Sustainable Small Grants Program, funded by Councils Sustainability Levy, closed on 30 September 2020. Three (3) applications were received and two (2) of these projects were recommended for immediate funding at the October Ordinary Council Meeting. The third project, received by Greenwich Public School, required further consultation.

 

This consultation is now complete, and the recommendation is that the project receive the requested funding.

 

Background

 

The purpose of the Sustainability Small Grants Program is to assist in the development of a range of initiatives that are of direct and practical benefit to a sustainable Lane Cove community. Organisations and community groups may apply for a grant of up to $5,000 to implement sustainability projects. Council’s sustainability guiding principle is to ensure that all decisions consider a balance of economic, environmental, cultural and social elements to enhance the quality of life in Lane Cove. The Sustainability Small Grants Selection Criteria (AT-1) is attached

 

Discussion

 

The grant request from Greenwich Public School – Parents and Citizens Association Inc – is for the purchase and installation of bike and scooter racks at the Kingslangley Campus. The bike racks would hold 28 bikes and the scooter racks would hold 14 scooters. The grants request totals $4,997.50.

 

Following internal discussions with the School Principal and the P&C Committee, the school would like to proceed with the grant application. While there is some existing capacity for bike and scooter parking there is not currently a sufficient number of bike racks given the increased number of bikes being ridden to the school.

 

The application was very comprehensive and in light of the recent endorsement from the Principal it is recommended that Council approve the grant request.

 

Budget

 

There is currently $7,608 remaining in the budget for this financial year. Funding of the successful application totals $4,997.50.

 

Conclusion

 

It is recommended that funding for Greenwich Public School be provided through the Sustainability

Small Grants Program as this project supports active transport and has direct and positive

community-based outcomes and long-term environmental and social benefits.

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

 

1.    Approve the funding from the Sustainability Small Grants Program for Greenwich Public             School to the value of $4,997.50; and

 

2.    Give Public Notice of the proposed funding under Round 20 of the Sustainability Small             Grants Program, and subject to no objections being received, grant the funds as outlined             above.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mark  Brisby

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Sustainability Small Grants Selection Criteria

7 Pages

 

 

 


ATTACHMENT 1

Sustainability Small Grants Selection Criteria

 

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Ordinary Council Meeting 7 December 2020

Ausgrid Community Solar Battery Project

 

 

Subject:          Ausgrid Community Solar Battery Project    

Record No:    SU7704 - 68767/20

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):      Fiona McCleary 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Since declaring a Climate Emergency in September 2019, Council has been investigating opportunities to decrease energy emissions across the community through the uptake of renewable energy.

 

At the October 2020 Ordinary Council Meeting Council resolved to explore a potential partnership in Ausgrid’s new pilot program rolling out community batteries in Sydney councils.

 

The Ausgrid Community Battery program has been investigated and while there are no immediate opportunities for Council to partner with Ausgrid, they are hoping to expand the trial in 2021 and will ensure that Council is included in their pipeline for future consideration.

 

Background

 

At the October 2020 Ordinary Council Meeting Council resolved to:

 

“explore the potential participation of the LGA in Ausgrid’s new pilot program rolling out community batteries in Sydney councils and a further report be submitted to Council”.

 

A community battery is a battery solution that allows solar customers to use more of the clean energy they generate, save on their electricity bills, and get more value from their solar investment, without needing to own and maintain their own household battery system.

 

Unlike a household battery, a community battery allows solar customers connected to the same local distribution network to share in a larger ‘community’ battery that is owned and maintained by Ausgrid.

 

Discussion

 

Ausgrid aim to show how community batteries can deliver cost savings for solar customers, while also addressing broader energy system needs.

 

Currently, Ausgrid are only able to work with three Local Government Areas to ensure they can effectively manage the trial whilst meeting the criteria for the number of solar customers already connected to the network in specific locations.

 

As part of Phase One of the trial, community batteries will be trialed in three locations in the City of Canterbury Bankstown Council, Lake Macquarie City Council and Northern Beaches Council.

 

Council has approached Ausgrid to register our interest in being considered a future partner. While there are no current opportunities to become involved, Ausgrid will consider Lane Cove as a location for future trials. 

 

 

 

Conclusion

 

Council continues to investigate opportunities that both encourage the uptake of renewable energy in the LGA and position Council as a supporter of sustainable innovation.

 

By declaring our interest as a potential partner in the Community Battery program Council sends a message to both Ausgrid and the community that we are committed to lowering energy emissions, supporting renewable energy and providing the community with opportunities to support a low carbon future.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.   The report be received and noted; and

 

2.   A further report be submitted to Council should we be successful in becoming a partner with Ausgrid for a future trial of the community Battery program.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mark  Brisby

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 7 December 2020

Official Opening of The Canopy on 29 November 2020

 

 

Subject:          Official Opening of The Canopy on 29 November 2020    

Record No:    SU7813 - 71585/20

Division:         Human Services Division

Author(s):      Corinne Hitchenson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council hosted its first event at The Canopy on Sunday 29 November with three special performances on the Village Green.

 

Background

 

Stage 1 of The Canopy officially opened on 13 June 2020. Due to COVID-19 restrictions it was not possible to encourage a gathering or host a celebration of this exciting milestone.

 

The purpose-built stage and village green area has been designed to accommodate a range of community and professional performances.

 

Discussion

 

To help demonstrates its capacity, Council planned a special COVID-Safe Celebration event on Sunday 29 November.  Members of the public could enter a ballot for free tickets to the event which featured three separate performances. The day began with a children’s performance by ABC Kid’s hit, Splash Dance, and an afternoon show by The John Morrison Band featuring guests Jacki Cooper and Jazz icon James Morrison.

 

The evening event included a special Acknowledgement of Country followed by official proceedings by the Mayor of Lane Cove, Pam Palmer who introduced headline act DIESEL.

 

The extreme weather affected numbers for the morning and mid-afternoon events as temperatures soared and wind gusts made for challenging conditions. More than 500 people were able to enjoy the performances with a full house for DIESEL’s show. Evening diners at the restaurants along Eat Street were also able to view the performances. A series of close proximity fireworks signalled the end of this special Council event.

 

 


 

Conclusion

 

The performance space at The Canopy can cater for first class acts which can be integrated into the overall event planning for Lane Cove village.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Gornall

Executive Manager - Human Services

Human Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 7 December 2020

The Canopy - Commendation Planning Institute of Australia (NSW) Awards for Planning Excellence 2020

 

 

Subject:          The Canopy - Commendation Planning Institute of Australia (NSW) Awards for Planning Excellence 2020     

Record No:    SU6222 - 71471/20

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):      Sebastian Stivala 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The Canopy project was nominated in this year’s Planning Institute of Australia, (PIA) Awards for Planning Excellence. The NSW Awards for Planning Excellence was held on Thursday, 26 November 2020. The Canopy Lane Cove received a Commendation and was a runner-up in the category of Best Planning Ideas - Small Project. It is recommended that Council receive and note the report.

 

Background

 

The Planning Institute of Australia, (PIA) is a highly regarded professional body and is sponsored by the NSW Government and The Hon. Rob Stokes PIA (Hon. Fellow) NSW Minister for Planning & Public Spaces.

 

The New South Wales Awards for Planning Excellence recognise and acknowledge quality, innovation and excellence in Planning. The Awards promote the important role of the Planning profession in the creation of New South Wales built environment and stimulates public awareness of good planning.

 

The PIA awards celebrate the achievements of organisations, individuals and projects in NSW, the awards show case leading practice across a range of disciplines and sectors, this year 63 nominations where submitted across 13 award categories.

 

The judging panel was “impressed with the high quality and diversity” of submissions this year andDetermining the winner and commendations was extremely difficult and very hard to split” Quote: Awards Convenor PIA NSW Elle Clouston PIA.

 

Discussion

 

PIA’s Executive Officer, Karen Goldsmith stated that ‘to be considered the submissions must be of standout quality. The Canopy submission demonstrated a design outcome of high quality and presents as a good place model of Council asset/land outcomes.

 

The judges acknowledged the significant engagement undertaken over an extended period that brought the community on the journey. While the design outcome is undeniably of high quality, the judges thought the concept didn’t present the same level of innovation and exception place outcome compared to the award winner.

 

The project was hence awarded second in its category’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 7 December 2020

Delegation of Authority During Christmas Recess

 

 

Subject:          Delegation of Authority During Christmas Recess    

Record No:    SU7568 - 70100/20

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Simon Cole 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The purpose of this report is to delegate authority to a Committee comprising of the Mayor and the General Manager to deal with urgent matters arising during the Christmas recess. 

 

Discussion

 

It is the normal practice to grant authority to the Mayor and General Manager to determine any urgent matters which may arise during the Christmas recess. Section 226(d) of the Local Government Act 1993 provides that the role of Mayor includes: “(d) to exercise, in cases of necessity, the policy-making functions of the governing body of the council between meetings of the council.”

 

Section 377(1) of the Local Government Act 1993 provides that Council may: “…delegate to the general manager or any other person or body (not including another employee of the council) any of the functions of the council under this or any other Act…”  The exercise of this power is confined by a list of matters that cannot be delegated.  This has worked well in the past by ensuring that the delegation is exercised in relation to urgent matters and that Council’s policies will apply.  Where no such policies exist, due caution will be exercised.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council, in accordance with Section 377 of the Local Government Act 1993, appoint a Committee comprising of the Mayor and the General Manager, or in their absence a delegate of the Mayor and/or the person acting as General Manager, to deal with and determine, urgent matters arising during the Council recess until 15 February 2021, in such cases applying Council’s policies, or where no such policies exist, exercising due caution.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jessica Quilty

Acting Executive Manager

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 7 December 2020

Appointment of Audit Committee Member

 

 

Subject:          Appointment of Audit Committee Member     

Record No:    SU740 - 71176/20

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Jessica Quilty 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

As a result of a resignation, a new independent representative is required for Council’s Audit Committee. The recruitment process for the appointment of the new representative to the Committee has been undertaken. It is therefore be recommended that Mr Dennis Vaccher be appointed to the Committee.

 

Background

 

As a measure to enhance its governance framework, Council at its meeting of 6 April 2009 established an Internal Audit Committee with the membership including one (1) Councillor representative and two (2) independent representatives, with one of the independents to be appointed as chair. The term of the Committee and independent representatives aligns with the Council term. However, because of the postponement of the Council elections until September 2021, it is necessary to appointment a representative until then.

 

It is noted that Council at its meeting of 20 October 2017, in determining membership of Advisory Committees resolved to appoint Clr Zbik as the Councillor representative on the Committee, with Clr Bennison as the alternate. The Internal Auditor, General Manager, Chief Financial Officer and Executive Manager – Corporate Services also attend meetings as observers.

 

Functions and Responsibilities

 

The functions of the Audit Committee include, the review and reporting of:-

 

·    The scope of work, performance and independence of both Internal and External Auditors;

·    Financial performance and the financial reporting process;

·    Comprehensive risk management framework, and associated procedures for effective identification and management of business and financial risks, and

·    Matters of accountability and internal control affecting the operations and management of risk in the Council.

 

The role and responsibilities of the members are in accordance with the Audit Committee Charter and in general include:-

 

·    Attend and participate in meetings;

·    Work co-operatively with other members in achieving the aims of the committee;

·    Contribute ideas and suggestions relating to items on the agenda;

·    Provide advice and recommendations to Council on items relating to the agenda; and

·    Action and follow up tasks established by the committee.


 

Appointment of Committee Members

 

The terms of appointment include the following conditions:-

 

·    All independent members’ appointments are to be for the term of Council in accordance with the adopted Audit Committee Charter. Independent members are eligible for extension or re-appointment following a formal review of their performance;

·    All appointments are to be made by Lane Cove Council based upon a demonstrated ability to meet the selection criteria;

·    Independent Members will be paid an attendance fee of $500 per formal meeting including preparation time; and

·    Any person/ company or organisation contracting services to Lane Cove Council may be precluded from being a member of the Committee.

Selection Criteria

 

The selection criteria required applicants to address the following:-

 

i.    be able to demonstrate relevant knowledge, skills and abilities in business/financial management , risk management and / or business innovation/improvement in a public sector environment and/or financial, legal or business sector;

ii.    have experience and demonstrated commitment in similar roles; and

iii.   have the ability to provide flexibility and availability to attend meetings and undertake duties and responsibilities as a member of the Committee;

Discussion

 

An advertisement for the recruitment of the new Independent representatives for the Audit Committee was placed on online which included and information outlining the objectives, functions and roles of the Committee and the membership as well as the charter.

 

At the closing date, Council had received thirteen (13) applications for appointment to the Committee. The Acting Executive Manager – Corporate Services and Head of Internal Audit conducted interviews with the 3 (3) shortlisted applicants and following appropriate referee checks, recommends the appointment of Mr Dennis Vaccher. (A copy of Mr Vaccher’s CV has been circulated separately to Councillors). Bernice Kesbah will continue as chair. A separate memorandum containing the relevant merits of each of the interviewed applicants has been circulated separately to Councillors.

 

It is noted that Internal Audit is a shared service with a number of other Northern Sydney Councils. An annual Workplan for the internal audit functions of Council is developed for and agreed by the Committee which meets on a quarterly basis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council appoints Mr Dennis Vaccher to Council’s Internal Audit Committee for the Council term ending in September 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jessica Quilty

Acting Executive Manager

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 7 December 2020

"Your High Street" Grant - Longueville Road Paving

 

 

Subject:          "Your High Street" Grant - Longueville Road Paving    

Record No:    SU1431 - 70091/20

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Sebastian Szewcow 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council was notified of the NSW Government’s “Your High Street” grant program on 12 November 2020. It is proposed to apply for funding to upgrade the paving on Longueville Road in the town centre. The new pavers will be consistent with the existing pavers in the Plaza. This will provide a much-needed facelift to the existing dated brick paving on Longueville Road and achieve a uniform feel throughout the town centre. In addition to the paving, the application will propose the installation of fairy lights on ten trees in The Plaza and around the town centre.

 

Council proposes to undertake consultation with the affected shop keepers to gain feedback on the proposal. While the Christmas period is not an ideal time to undertake consultation, due to the short notice period of the grant and the January closing date, there is no other option than to undertake consultation during this period.

 

Background

 

The Department of Planning, Industry and Environment has notified Council of the “Your High Street” Grant Program. The Program aims to improve the amenity and functionality of high streets to support an increase in local business trading. The Grant is open to all local Councils across NSW and will provide funding up to $1 million and does not require a matching contribution. Projects must be delivered within 12 Months from funding approval. Applications for the grant close on Friday 29 January 2021.

 

The existing brick paving on Longueville road presents several challenges for Council’s assets team. The pavers are no longer available which means that any restoration work requires the sourcing of new pavers that resemble the existing ones. This has proven a challenge and it has been difficult to match colour, size and texture. There are several areas requiring works due to issues such as tree root uplift and stormwater problem. These issues would be addressed with the installation of new pavers.

 

A previous grant funding application was made for the installation of fairy lights on Longueville Road which was unsuccessful. The addition of fairy lights to the funding proposal will bring merit to the application and provide an additional attractor for the shopping precinct.

 

Discussion

 

Council’s long term works program anticipated replacing the pavers in Longueville Road and Burns Bay Road to match the paving in the Plaza. The grant will allow these works to be brought forward.

The proposed paving area on Longueville Road is between Birdwood Lane and Austin Street on the western side, and between Little Street and Gallery Lane Cove on the eastern side, comprises approximately 2300 sqm. The pavers will be consistent with the existing pavers in the Plaza and in front of number 71 Longueville Road. This will provide a much-needed facelift to the existing dated brick paving on Longueville Road and achieve a uniform feel throughout the town centre. The new pavers will bring a sense of continuity to the shopping precinct and improve amenity and safety for pedestrians. Stage 2 of the project would involve Council extending the paying to the edge of the Village along Burns Bay Road, some 1,700 sqm.

Fairy light installation is proposed throughout the Plaza, outside Gallery Lane Cove and the Lane Cove Library. The lighting will enhance 10 large trees, building on local character and providing an additional attractor to shopping precinct. The series of light installations will create a visual path and lead people through Lane Cove Plaza between Longueville Road through to Burns Bay Road.

 

The purpose of this proposal is to ensure Lane Cove’s ‘high street’ and Plaza shopping precinct are activated by creating new high-quality public spaces. This proposal will attract pedestrians and encourage shopping and the use of open spaces by creating an attractive and enticing precinct that will stimulate the flow and movement of people.

 

Community Consultation

 

Statement of Intent

 

Council was notified of the “Your High Street” grant on 12 November 2020. While the Christmas period is not an ideal time to undertake consultation, due to the short notice period of the grant and the January closing date, there is no other option than to undertake consultation during this period.

 

The consultation is designed to seek feedback from affected shopkeepers on the paving proposal.  Any comments received will be reviewed and evaluated to determine support for the project and any issues to be considered in delivery of the project.

 

Method

 

Level of Participation

Inform

Consult

Form of Participation

Open

Targeted

Target Audience

General Community

Longueville Road shopkeepers and property owners

Proposed Medium

Email, Social Media and website exhibition

 

Notification Letter/ Letterbox Drop

 

Indicative Timing

(December 2020- January 2021)

(December 2020- January 2021)

 

Conclusion

 

The proposed upgrade to the paving on Longueville Road and the installation of fairy lights will provide benefits to the community, businesses and Council in terms of maintenance. The works will improve amenity, attract people to the town centre and improve quality and efficiency for maintenance and restoration work.

 

Consultation will be undertaken with shopkeepers on Longueville Road to obtain their feedback on the proposal. As the grant application is due prior to the next Council meeting in February 2021, the consultation results will be incorporated into the application for funding under the “Your High Street” Grant Program and finalised under delegated authority.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.   The report be received and noted;

 

2.   Consultation be undertaken in December2020/January 2021 as outlined in the Consultation Strategy contained within the report; and

 

3.   Council apply for funding under the “Your High Street” Grant program to upgrade the paving on Longueville road and install Fairy lights in ten trees in and around the town Centre, incorporating the results of the Consultation Strategy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Terescenko

Executive Manager - Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Guidelines NSW Government  "Your High Street" Grant Program

23 Pages

Available Electronically

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 7 December 2020

Lane Cove Bush Kids Highly Commended Recipient

 

 

Subject:          Lane Cove Bush Kids Highly Commended Recipient    

Record No:    SU7519 - 70125/20

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Valerie  Holland; Ted Webster 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council’s Lane Cove Bush Kids program was nominated for the 2020 NSW Environmental Education Award and received a highly commended recognition in the Take Me Outside NSW Excellence Award category during this year’s Australian Association of Environmental Education annual awards.

Background

 

Lane Cove Bush Kids was initially established by the Lane Cove Bushland and Conservation Society. Council formed a partnership with the Society and in January 2016, Council hired Valerie Holland to run the program.  Bush Kids encourages local families to explore, value and connect with Lane Cove’s natural environment.  Four seasonal programs with up to 20 activities per program are offered each year at various bushland reserves in the local area. The program has grown in popularity from 199 participants in 2015 to 1,043 participants in 2020.  During the COVID-19 lockdown, the program was adapted to online with virtual bushwalks, nature storytelling and craft. This was well received and kept families engaged with nature throughout a difficult time.

Discussion

 

The Australian Association of Environmental Education is Australia’s peak professional body for environmental educators.  The organisation advocates for environmental education and contributes to skills development to help professionals stay at the forefront of education for sustainability. 

This year the annual award ceremony was online, Patron, Costa Georgiadis gave some reflections on the year and congratulations to all the nominees and winners via video link.  The Lane Cove Bush Kids program received a highly commended recognition in the Take Me Outside NSW Excellence Award category.

The Lane Cove Bush Kids program achieves the following objectives:

1.   Engages local families with Lane Cove’s natural environment.

2.   Introduces families to natural areas that are new to them.

3.   Fosters environmental awareness, stewardship and value for the natural environment.

4.   Provides opportunities for families to meet and make new friendships.

5.   Engages both adults and children in learning about native flora and fauna.

 

Conclusion

 

Lane Cove Bush Kids strives to provide activities that reflects the guiding principles and values of Council with inclusive and innovative programs.  Since 2016, the program has responded to the needs and wants of our Bush Kids families giving them access to quality activities with a focus on professional service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Terescenko

Executive Manager - Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

2020 NSW Environmental Education Awards

1 Page

 

 

 


ATTACHMENT 1

2020 NSW Environmental Education Awards

 

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Ordinary Council Meeting 7 December 2020

Greening our City Grant

 

 

Subject:          Greening our City Grant     

Record No:    SU8058 - 71939/20

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Helen Haigh 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council has been successful in obtaining a $73,100 grant as part of the second round of funding for the Greening of City grants through the Department of Planning Industry and Environment (DPIE). 

 

The funds will be utilised to expand the tree canopy cover in Longueville from 2021 as part of the Connecting Street Canopy Corridors project.  Longueville has been identified as it has the least amount of canopy coverage within the Council area while also having the most amount of viable planting sites. The expansion of canopy cover will help to increase shade and reduce heat at the same time as providing habitat connections for wildlife.  The project aligns with multiple Council plans and strategies to maintain and enhance the overall urban forest and canopy cover on public and private land throughout Lane Cove. It is recommended that the report be received and noted.

 

Background

The DPIE website states;

“The Greening our City Premier’s Priority focusses on improving livability in our biggest city by planting one million trees in Greater Sydney by 2022. This is an important first step in meeting our ambitious goal of planting five million trees by 2030. Increasing the tree canopy in our local parks, streets and neighbourhoods will provide much needed shade and shelter from heat, improve our air and water quality, improve health and wellbeing and build our resilience to climate change. 

Greening our City grants support local councils and their partners to enhance urban tree canopy and green cover by co-funding tree planting and demonstration projects across Greater Sydney. The second round of Greening our City grants has awarded $10.2 million in grant funding to 50 projects in Greater Sydney across two funding streams:

·      Stream 1: Cooler suburbs. $8.1 million has been awarded to 38 projects to boost council tree planting projects. As a result, Greater Sydney will have over 40,000 newly planted trees in public spaces, increasing shade and amenity in our parks and streets.

·      Stream 2: Green innovations. $2.1 million has been awarded to 12 projects that will showcase best practice, scalable solutions to overcome barriers to tree planting. These projects will increase tree canopy and green cover across Greater Sydney, providing cooler neighbourhoods.”

Discussion

 

Despite Lane Cove being known as a ‘leafy green suburb’, changes to land use zoning and the introduction of the 10/50 rule there was a loss of over 350 trees in 2014 alone. This has contributed to the loss of tree canopy cover and has reduced the overall canopy cover in Lane Cove significantly. Street tree planting allows Council to choose the best species and manage the health of the tree on public land.

The project addresses multiple Council objectives including; the Urban Forest objective in Livable Lane Cove Community Strategic Plan, 2035; to maintain and enhance the overall urban forest and canopy cover on public and private land throughout Lane Cove. This project aligns more specifically with Council’s Open Space Plan objective to identify and improve links between unconnected open spaces areas to reduce fragmentation of canopy cover and enhance habitat corridors.  The project also aligns with the Bushland Plan of Management, Sustainability Action Plan, Street Tree Master Plan, Recreation Action Plan and Council recent declaration of a Climate Emergency.

 

Council applied for the funding under the Greening of City grants through the Department of Planning Industry and Environment (DPIE) in Stream 1: Cooler Suburbs and has been successful in obtaining a $73,100 grant as part of the second round of funding. An additional $40,000 will be contributed by Council through an existing Sustainability Levy project and utilise a portion of Councils tree replenishment budget.

When applying for the grant Council utilised the Online Spatial tool developed by DPIE and Council’s recently mapped street tree data to determine the suburb most in need of increasing canopy cover. Longueville has been identified as it has the least amount of canopy coverage within the Council area while also having the most amount of viable planting sites.

 

Funds will be used to purchase 300 trees, planting and establishment, followed by maintenance for one year.  Trees will be chosen to suit each site specially and take into consideration; the height of trees for views, overhead powerlines, soil type and existing tree species in the street.

 

A program will be developed to engage local Longueville residents in locations where a street tree is proposed to be planted.  Residents will be provided with information on tree species and the benefit of trees to increase knowledge which will assist in minimising vandalism. 

Conclusion

 

Council has been successful in obtaining $73,100 funding under the Greening of City grants to plant street trees in the suburb of Longueville.  The project allows Council to significantly increase the current tree replenishment program for 2021 – 2022 by planting an extra 300 trees.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receive and note the report.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Terescenko

Executive Manager - Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 7 December 2020

Traffic Committee - November 2020

 

 

Subject:          Traffic Committee - November 2020    

Record No:    SU1326 - 70998/20

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Sashika Perera 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The Lane Cove Traffic Committee Meeting was held on Tuesday, 17 November 2020. The Agenda is included as AT-1. The Traffic Committee recommendations are shown in the Minutes of the Meeting, included as AT-2.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council adopts the recommendations of the Lane Cove Traffic Committee Meeting held on Tuesday, 17 November 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Terescenko

Executive Manager - Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Traffic Committee Agenda - November 2020

28 Pages

 

AT‑2View

Traffic Committee Minutes - November 2020

20 Pages

 

 

 


ATTACHMENT 1

Traffic Committee Agenda - November 2020

 

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Traffic Committee Minutes - November 2020

 

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Ordinary Council Meeting 7 December 2020

Council Snapshot November 2020

 

 

Subject:          Council Snapshot November 2020

Record No:    SU220 - 70181/20

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):      Craig Wrightson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Attached for the information of Councillors is a review of Council’s recent activities. This report provides a summary of the operations of each division for November 2020.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Council Snapshot November 2020

40 Pages

 

 

 


ATTACHMENT 1

Council Snapshot November 2020

 

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