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Agenda

Ordinary Council Meeting

20 July 2020

The meeting commences at 6.30pm. If members of the public are

not interested in any business recommended to be considered in

Closed Session or there is no such business, Council will ordinarily

  commence consideration of all other business at 7pm.

 

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Notice of Meeting

 

Dear Councillors

 

Notice is given of the Ordinary Council Meeting, to be on Monday 20 July 2020 commencing at 7.00 PM. The business to be transacted at the meeting is included in this business paper.

To coincide with the messaging from the NSW Government and in the interests of public health, the May meeting will be conducted online.

Members of the public will not be permitted to attend the Council Chambers. Councillors will be attending and participating in the meeting via video conference.

Members of the public who wish to address Council about items on the Meeting Agenda should send their typed, written address via email to service@lanecove.nsw.gov.au. Written addresses are to be received by Council no later than midnight, on the day prior to the meeting – i.e. 19 July 2020. Please note that the time limit of three minutes per address still applies so please make sure your written submission meets this criteria (500 words maximum).

Craig - GMYours faithfully

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

 

Council Meeting Procedures

 

The Council meeting is chaired by the Mayor, Councillor Pam Palmer. Councillors are entitled to one vote on a matter. If votes are equal, the Chairperson has a second or casting vote. When a majority of Councillors vote in favour of a Motion it becomes a decision of the Council. Minutes of Council and Committee meetings are published on Council’s website www.lanecove.nsw.gov.au by 5pm on the Thursday following the meeting.

 

The Meeting is conducted in accordance with Council's Code of Meeting Practice. The order of business is listed in the Agenda on the next page. That order will be followed unless Council resolves to modify the order at the meeting. This may occur for example where the members of the public in attendance are interested in specific items on the agenda.

 

If you do not understand any part of the information given above; require assistance to participate in the meeting due to a disability; or wish to obtain information in relation to Council, please contact Council’s Executive Manager – Corporate Services on (02) 9911 3550.

 

Please note meetings are recorded for the purposes of verifying the accuracy of minutes and the tapes are not disclosed to any third party under the Government Information (Public Access)  Act 2009, except as allowed under section 18(1) or section 19(1) of the PPIP Act, or where Council is compelled to do so by court order, warrant or subpoena or by any other legislation.

 

 


Ordinary Council 20 July 2020

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

APOLOGIES

 

OPENING OF MEETING WITH PRAYER

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT TO COUNTRY

 

NOTICE OF WEBCASTING OF MEETING

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

 

1.      ORDINARY COUNCIL MEETING - 15 JUNE 2020

 

Orders Of The Day

 

Notices of Motion

 

2.       Notice of Motion - Manns Point Lookout ...................................................... 4

 

3.       Notice of Motion - Dog-friendly Lane Cove Strategy............................. 5

 

4.       Notice of Motion - Boarding Houses............................................................... 7

 

5.       Notice of Motion - Narriearra Station Purchase..................................... 9

 

Officer Reports for Determination

 

6.       Completion Of The Canopy................................................................................. 10

 

7.       Bob Campbell Oval Masterplan and Grant Funding............................. 16

 

8.       MWOO and FOGO Waste Processing ............................................................... 27

 

9.       Petition calling for limit to height and density controls in the Mowbray Precinct................................................................................................. 34

 

10.     Finalisation of the Draft Playground Strategy................................... 39

 

11.     Interaction Upgrades – Installation of Traffic Signal at two locations................................................................................................................... 85

 

12.     Building Upgrade Finance – Improving Environmental Performance of Commercial Buildings.......................................................................................... 89

 

13.     Meeting House Preschool – End of Lease, 47 Burns Bay Road, Lane Cove............................................................................................................................ 109

 

14.     Closure of the Willoughby/Lane Cove Family Day Care Scheme . 112

 

15.     Waste, Recyclables and Garden Organics Collection & Recycling Processing Tender - Tender Number 768520.............................................. 115

 

16.     Council Snapshot June 2020............................................................................. 118  

 

 

                     


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2020

Notice of Motion - Manns Point Lookout

 

 

Subject:          Notice of Motion - Manns Point Lookout     

Record No:    SU6757 - 39884/20

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):      Councillor Pam Palmer 

 

 

Executive Summary

                                                              

Manns Point in Greenwich provides one of Sydney Harbour’s iconic vistas and is a favourite viewing location for the fireworks display every New Year’s Eve.

 

It is recommended that Council develop a specific plan for enhancing the area as an iconic viewpoint and for preserving its natural features.

 

Background

 

Recent plans to replace the damaged fence at the headland has highlighted the opportunity to improve this incredible location. 

 

The area would benefit from a longer-term plan for further improvements. For example:-

 

·    Consider the re-location of park seating to improve shade, view, and access

·    Ensure consistency in design of park furniture

·    Develop a concept for the area’s interface to bushland and neighbours, including Gore Bay Terminal, to improve the attractiveness of the area and to maintain the iconic view

·    Research the aboriginal heritage of the area and acknowledge this in some way

·    Consider redesign of the current roadway to create a more pedestrian-friendly and beautiful headland area.

 

It is hoped that development of the plan would see specific funds allocated in the future towards enhancement of this iconic location.  ‘Ward funds’ could also be allocated towards capital works.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council develop a plan for the Manns Point lookout area to acknowledge it as an iconic viewpoint and enhance its natural features

 

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor Pam Palmer

Mayor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2020

Notice of Motion - Dog-friendly Lane Cove Strategy

 

 

Subject:          Notice of Motion - Dog-friendly Lane Cove Strategy    

Record No:    SU677 - 39893/20

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):      Councillor Pam Palmer 

 

 

Executive Summary

                                                              

There are nearly 6,000 dogs registered in Lane Cove[1]

 

Council has always had a very dog- friendly policy position.  Rangers, for example, are known to do their very utmost to return lost dogs to their homes.  As a further example, most open space (excluding bushland) in Lane Cove allows for dogs to exercise off-leash while State Government requirements are that only one area must be designated as off-leash in each Council LGA. Also, for comparison, most adjoining LGAs do not allow dogs off-leash on their main sportsfields.  In fact, Mosman bans dogs from its ovals.

 

Council has recently created fenced off-leash areas exclusively for dogs, at Blackman Park and at Turrumburra Park.

 

However, it is apparent that residents would appreciate even more facilities which are dog-friendly. 

It is therefore recommended that Council develop a ‘Dog-friendly Lane Cove’ strategy encouraging more facilities, special events, and smoother processes to ensure the needs of dog owners are addressed.

 

The strategy would also provide an opportunity to better inform residents of the latest information about dog registration, procedures for reporting dangerous dogs and advice on dog adoptions. The strategy itself could be developed without requiring any specific funding

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council develop a ‘Dog-friendly Lane Cove’ strategy which could include:-

 

1.   A central point of contact at Council for dog-related information;

 

2.   Opportunities for more designated leash-free exercise areas;

 

3.   A designated foreshore area for dogs to swim;

 

4.   Events such as fun days or obedience training days which also involve the many local business which provide pet services;

 

5.   Pet registry advice and information on local services for adopting a rescue dog;

 

6.   Code of Conduct for dog owners (as is currently being developed with Longueville residents);

 

7.   Encouraging agility trainers to hold regular training in the area such as at Turrumburra Park;

 

8.   Eco-friendly dog poo bags and improved design for dispensers and bins; and

 

9.   Ensuring access to drinking water for dogs at all leash-free areas.

 

 

Councillor Pam Palmer

Mayor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2020

Notice of Motion - Boarding Houses

 

 

Subject:          Notice of Motion - Boarding Houses    

Record No:    SU5265 - 39902/20

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):      Councillor Pam Palmer 

 

 

Executive Summary

                                                              

Council has received a number of Development Applications for boarding house development since the SEPP was introduced in 2009.

 

The applications have generally not been well received by the community for a number of reasons, mainly linked to the incentives provided under the SEPP which override Council’s development controls.

 

It is suggested that Council conduct a review of the implementation of the SEPP to take our community’s concerns into account and identify any procedures which Council could adopt to improve the outcomes.

 

Discussion

 

State Environmental Planning Policy (Affordable Rental Housing) [‘AHSEPP’] was introduced on 31 July 2009 to increase the supply and diversity of affordable rental and social housing throughout NSW.  The AHSEPP includes special provisions to encourage boarding houses and thereby addresses the need to provide more affordable housing.

 

The term ‘boarding house’ used in the AHSEPP relates to a building that:-  

 

·    Is wholly or partly let in lodgings;  

·    Provides lodgers with a principal place of residence for three months or more;  

·    May have shared facilities, such as a communal living room, bathroom, kitchen or laundry; and  

·    Has rooms, some or all of which may have private kitchen and bathroom facilities, that accommodate one or more lodgers.

 

but does not include backpackers’ accommodation, group homes, serviced apartments, seniors housing or hotel or motel accommodation.  

 

Special Incentives

 

1.  The AHSEPP makes boarding houses permissible throughout the following zones:-

 

·      R1 General Residential;

·      R2 Low Density Residential zones in locations close to public transport services;

·      R3 Medium Density Residential;

·      R4 High Density Residential;

·      B1 Neighbourhood Centre;

·      B2 Local Centre; and

·      B4 Mixed Use.

 

2. According to the DoPI fact sheet “Supporting Affordable Rental Housing – New Generation Boarding Houses” (refer Pub no: DOP 09_014/A), eligible boarding houses are exempt from land tax.

3. Housing NSW operates the Boarding House Financial Assistance Program, which gives grants to owners for essential fire-safety works, for both existing and new dwellings.

 

4. In areas already zoned for flats, additional floor space above the existing maximum is allowed:-

 

·    0.5:1, if the existing maximum floor space ratio is 2.5:1 or less, or

·    20% of the existing maximum floor space ratio, if the existing maximum floor space ratio is greater than 2.5:1.

 

Fair Trading requirements

 

To make sure boarding houses are maintained to high standards, the Boarding Houses Act 2012 has:-

 

·    Established a public register of boarding houses in NSW;

·    Increased inspection powers for local councils; and

·    Introduced occupancy rights for people living in boarding houses.

Local councils are responsible for approving new boarding houses and enforcing safety and accommodation standards in existing boarding houses. They also have the power to fine operators if they are unregistered and order them to meet building, safety and accommodation standards.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.    Council conducts a review of the implementation of the SEPP in the Lane Cove LGA to identify any procedures which Council could adopt to make sure boarding houses are maintained to high standards; and

 

2.    The review is to include our community’s concerns, DCP controls, and Council’s regulatory powers.

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor Pam Palmer

Mayor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2020

Notice of Motion - Narriearra Station Purchase

 

 

Subject:          Notice of Motion - Narriearra Station Purchase    

Record No:    SU7238 - 39907/20

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):      Councillor Karola Brent 

 

 

Executive Summary

                                                              

Last month, the NSW State Government purchased Narriearra Station, over 150,000 hectares of previously privately held land in the State’s far north west, in border to create a new conservation area. It is the largest land purchase in NSW’s history for national parkland. Annexed to the bordering Sturt National Park, Narriearra will create close to half a million hectares for conservation, which includes wetland bird habitats, 25 endangered species, and significant Aboriginal artefacts and sites.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council writes to the Hon. Matt Kean, Minister for Energy and Environment, copying our local member, the Hon. Anthony Roberts, to thank the NSW Government for the purchase of Narriearra Station for the purpose of creating a national park, and express Lane Cove Council’s support for the vision of environmental and cultural conservation in NSW.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor Karola Brent

Councillor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

   


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2020

Completion Of The Canopy

 

 

Subject:          Completion Of The Canopy    

Record No:    SU6222 - 39636/20

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):      Craig Wrightson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The Canopy project is now complete, delivering a unique facility in the heart of the village. It has been completed on time and on budget, however with the impact of COVID-19, the final stage, the ‘Eat Street’ will not open until October 2020. An official opening is now planned for 18 October 2020.

 

The Canopy was a team effort, with contributions made by staff across the whole Council. The contractors involved did an excellent job in delivering on Council’s vision to a high standard, with every effort made to minimise the impact on the community throughout the construction program.

 

It is recommended that Council commend the staff and contractors involved and an official opening event be held on Sunday 18 October 2020.

 

Discussion

 

After almost 3 years of construction, The Canopy was completed by ADCO Constructions on 13 June 2020, which was within one week of the completion date which had originally been forecast at the beginning of 2017 and aligns with Council’s timetable to complete by June 2020.

 

Overall the project, despite COVID-19 and 94 days of delays from weather, was completed 3 months ahead of the builder’s contractual completion date of 17 September 2020.

 

The project was bold, as it is a unique design and combination of assets. It can be summarised as:-

 

·    A state-of-the-art public open space including Village Green, playgrounds, performance space, BBQ facilities and town square with water feature;

·    Four underground levels providing 500 car parking spaces. This is almost a 300% increase in the amount of spaces in the previous car park;

·    Two anchor tenants, ALDI and Coles, situated under the public open space;

·    Several park side and laneway food and beverage tenancies;

·    A pedestrian bridge over Rosenthal Avenue, including lift and stairs located on the western side of Rosenthal Avenue to connect to the public walking through to Coxs Lane; and

·    Upgrades to Birdwood Lane pavements and street furniture to create a shared pedestrian zone with level access.

 

Highlights of the build include:-

 

·    During the excavation phase, 250,000 tonnes of material was removed from site, the weight of which is almost equivalent to the largest cruise ship in the world, Symphony of the Seas;

·    145 x 8-metre-long bored piles were installed to the perimeter retailing wall and foundations;

·    18,000 m3 of concrete was poured throughout the project’s various structures;

·    400km of steel reinforcement was installed on the project, an equivalent distance of travelling from Sydney to Port Macquarie;

·    143 tonnes of steel was installed to the park level retail tenancies;

·    The rock wall facade along Rosenthal Avenue features approximately 584sq m of Sydney Sandstone blocks, weighing over 1400 tonnes;

·    The Canopy park and upgrade of Birdwood Lane and Rosenthal Lane features over 50,000 granite pavers;

·    The project is now home to 137 larger trees and 3,985 smaller trees, shrubs, and plants. These replace the previously existing flora palette with a more endemic selection;

·    A 12 tonne pedestrian footbridge was constructed over Rosenthal Avenue; and

·    A total of 1,079 shingles were installed to create the Reflections entry canopy.

 

Project Design

 

The Canopy included one of the most comprehensive consultation processes undertaken by Council which led to development of the key objectives to direct the design to achieve the ‘place making’ outcome desired by the community. The objectives were:-

 

Cultural – A place that welcomes all and encourages community expression, gathering, sharing and celebration.

 

Social – A place that invites all people to participate in community life and supports social interaction.

 

Environmental – A park-­like place that is organic, green and connects the different parts of the Village while providing a range of experiences, across generations and interests.

 

Economic – A place that compliments the existing economy, seeds a night time economy and activates the lane ways.

 

In line with these objectives The Canopy is home to a range of features that promote an inclusive community. Of note is Lane Cove’s first Changing Place, a change facility with adult change table, hoist, shower, peninsula door, which allows people with high support needs to fully participate in the community. There are just 136 of these facilities in Australia and this is the only one available in a public space on the North Shore.

 

In addition, there are bicycle end of trip facilities and racks, accessible toilets at each end of the park level and a Parents Room complete with nursing chairs and baby change facilities.

All connections to and pathways throughout are at accessible grades, and the playground includes a Sway-Fun Glider ® which can accommodate wheelchairs and walking aids.

 

The Canopy Car Park includes 14 disabled, 16 Seniors and 8 Parents with Prams spaces located across the four levels of the 500 space underground car park, which is supported by travelators and lifts to bring visitors to the retail and park levels.

 

Another key element of the project was to demonstrate Council’s commitment to sustainability. The Canopy is home to many new sustainability features, including a living, breathing green wall, 230 solar panels (75kw), led lighting throughout, electric vehicle charging points, regenerative lifts, 90,000l water harvesting tank and a bespoke solar arbour, “the only public place in Australia you can see a printed solar cell”, which is a partnership with Newcastle University.

 


 

Artist Impression 2017

 

 

Completed Project

 

 

Project Milestones

 

The project was first identified in Council’s 2007 Major Projects Plan. To bring the project to fruition took two Council terms. Key milestones for the project were as follows:-

 

·    November 2012, Council determined to progress the redevelopment of the Rosenthal Car Park Site;

·    April/May 2013, the design brief for the future public space was developed in consultation with the community;

·    July 2013, a reference scheme incorporating the car park, retail tenancies and the opportunity for future public space was developed;

·    September 2014, a design ideas competition was conducted with 4 landscape architectural firms for the future public space;

·    April 2015, following exhibition of the landscape architect schemes in the Plaza, the preferred ideas were adopted and incorporated into a base design for the open space. Council also developed a financial model for delivery of the project;

·    September 2015 Council considered a Feasibility Analysis and committed to the project, which included utilisation of debt to be repaid by rent from the retail tenancies, if required;

·    November 2015, the commercial terms for rental of the retail space to Coles and ALDI was agreed;

·    November 2016, the construction contract was awarded to ADCO Constructions;

·    September 2017, construction commenced;

·    April 2019, a 45-space temporary car park opened at the southern end of the site;

·    December 2019, levels, 2,3, and 4 of the underground car park opened; and

·    6 June 2020 project competed.

 

Opening Phases

 

Due to the impact of COVID-19, The Canopy is opening in three stages:-

 

Stage 1 comprising the park, children’s playground, performance stage, village green, pedestrian bridge over Rosenthal Avenue, all levels of the car park, the new paved Birdwood Lane and Plaza connections. opened 13 June 2020.

 

Stage 2, Retail tenancies, The Aldi supermarket opened 17 June 2020 and the Coles supermarket and Liquorland opened 8 July 2020.

 

Stage 3 will see the ‘Eat Street’ open in October 2020. The Laneway tenancies have been confirmed as:-

 

·    Garcon, French Bistro;

·    Sugarlane, South East Asian Cuisine;

·    Peanut Butter Jelly, World inspired street food; and

·    Masala Kitchen, Modern Indian.

 

Subject to COVID-19 restrictions an opening event is planned for Sunday 18 October 2020. Due to COVID-19 restrictions it is planned to conduct a ballot for the community to attend. Detailed planning is currently underway.

 

Project Funding

 

The planning and funding for the project was based on the 2008 Major Projects Plan. “The Plan provides a holistic approach by considering each of the projects as a combined package undertaken over a 10 year period. This holistic approach includes the planning, timing and funding interrelationships of the various projects. The Plan establishes a financially responsible framework to deliver to the community in a timely manner a number of community facilities, additional carparking in the Lane Cove CBD, enhanced open space ….

 

The Budget for the project was $80M and was delivered for $78.9M. Funding for the project is outlined below. Ultimately Council did not need to utilise external debt to fund the project.

 

Funding Source

Actual

$Million

Major Projects Plan

 

Sale of 314 Burns Bay Rd, Friedlander Place below Ground Stratum, Little Lane Car Park air space

$48

Capital Contributions

 

S.7.11/ s94 Developer contributions *

$25

General Revenue

 

Special Rate Parking

$1.1

Sustainability Levy

$0.5

Internal reserves and tenancy rental income

$4.3

* The s94 Works Schedule allows for $35M to be funded from s94 Development Contributions 

 

 

Project Delivery

 

While Council is a relatively small council, it has consistently ‘punched above its weight’, particularly in relation innovation and the provision of community assets. This can be seen in the Plaza, Library, Aquatic Centre, Blackman Park and now The Canopy.

 

The Canopy is the largest, most expensive and most complex project ever undertaken by Council. It is appropriate to acknowledge that so many staff contributed, and for the majority of them, they undertook their role in relation to The Canopy in addition to their normal activities. This was truly a team effort as contributions were made by staff across the whole Council. Some staff require particular mention:-

 

·    Mr John Lee, Former Director - Major Projects, who developed the scheme concept and planning;

·    Mr Geoffrey Douglas, Former Director - Major Projects, who developed the scheme design, undertook procurement and initial project management phases;

·    Mr Sebastian Stivala, Director - Major Projects, who completed the final project management and delivery phases; and

·    Ms Corinne Hitchenson, Manager – Communication and Events, who managed communications, public art and event planning for the space.

 

It is appropriate also to acknowledge the key contractors and their staff who delivered the project:-

 

Builder                         ADCO Constructions              Yiorgos Crespis and Nick Lyons

Architects                    Scott Carver                            Robert Sanderson and Georgia Jezeph

Project Management  AECOM                                  Trevor Marinovich and Jason Richards

 

Conclusion

 

Unlike other surrounding shopping areas which have seen the commercial precinct grow in scale and height, Lane Cove has focused on retaining the village look and feel. The Plaza has long been the focal point for The Village and The Canopy has been designed to complement it by providing the only element missing in the village, a park.

 

The Canopy will be like Council’s other key assets, something which creates ‘community’ for generations to come. A sign of its success is how quickly it has integrated into the everyday lives of locals. Its design and execution are not something typically seen in the suburbs, rather something more likely to be seen in a city environment.  Its facilities will ensure a wide range of people utilise it every day and deliver on Council’s overall vision “Lane Cove as a connected, inclusive, sustainable community”.

 

The Canopy was made possible by a succession of Councillors who looked beyond a single Council term to achieve such a lengthy and complex project. Council staff acknowledge and thank the Councillors for the trust placed in them, and the results from this partnership are self-evident.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.   The report be received and noted;

2.   Council commend the staff and contractors for their excellent work in delivering The Canopy, and invite the key people to the official opening; and

 

3.   Subject to COVID-19 restrictions, the official opening event for The Canopy be conducted on Sunday 18 October 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2020

Bob Campbell Oval Masterplan and Grant Funding

 

 

Subject:          Bob Campbell Oval Masterplan and Grant Funding    

Record No:    SU5606 - 39365/20

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Ted Webster 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report outlines the status of Bob Campbell Oval Master Plan and the opportunity to utilise grant funding from the St Leonards/Crows Nest 2036 Precinct Support Scheme to implement the Master Plan.

 

As part of the St Leonards/Crows Nest 2036 Plan the NSW Department of Planning, Environment and Industry (DPEI) introduced a Precinct Support Scheme where relevant councils nominate suitable infrastructure projects to be delivered in advance to support the development of these planned precincts. Council nominated a preliminary Bob Campbell Oval Master Plan for the Support Scheme Grant and was successful in being awarded $3,623,023.

 

It is now proposed to undertake community consultation on the Master Plan prior to implementation.

 

Background

 

Prior to the 1930’s the area now known as Bob Campbell Oval was a tidal mangrove flat that drained into Gore Bay. As part of unemployment relief during the depression, Council via a government grant commenced works to redirect Gore Creek to allow for land reclamation of the mangrove to be undertaken to create a public reserve. These works consisted of quarrying the sandstone escarpment to widen the valley; filling in the mangroves; redirecting the flow of the creek and constructing the sandstone channel that is visible today.

 

Since then, Bob Campbell Oval has been used for community sports, primarily soccer in winter and junior cricket in summer.  It is heavily used by locals for a wide range of informal active and passive recreational activities including as an off-leash dog exercise area most days of the year and plays a key role in developing and maintaining strong community links.

 

The Oval is the home ground of the Greenwich Sports Club, an affiliate club in the Northern Sydney Football Association.  It is currently used for organised team training and soccer games for 30 to 35 hours per week in winter. This includes training of 4 afternoons/nights per week, games on both Saturday and Sunday, as well as Greenwich Public School sports during the school week.  In summer it is used for cricket matches organised through the Northern Suburbs Cricket Association and Greenwich Public School sports as well as other informal sporting activities.

 

In winter, the number of hours used for training and games is close to the field’s capacity.  This use and the excessive winter shade from the surrounding steep-sided valley means that the existing grassed playing surface needs to be refurbished regularly.  The greatly diminished quality of the playing surface can be clearly seen in AT-1. These images show the condition of the oval in April 2018 and August 2018 show that the oval’s condition deteriorates rapidly during this time. This is ongoing issue that happens every year.

 

Note: images from the 2019 season have not been used for this example as there was substantial damage caused to the oval due to unapproved senior training in late summer 2019 with training/games suspended for a large portion of the winter season, while repair works were undertaken.

 

Council’s 2008 Recreation Action Plan was developed to identify existing gaps in sports infrastructure and planned for increased capacity as a result of increased participation in sport. It recommended that Council investigate the option of a synthetic field at Blackman Park or Bob Campbell Oval, along with upgraded cricket wickets and improved lighting. The Blackman Park upgrades were ultimately completed in 2014.

 

The 2014 NSROC Regional Sportsground Strategy which covered the LGAs of Hornsby, Hunter’s Hill, Ku-ring-gai, Lane Cove, North Sydney, Ryde and Willoughby, identified that demand would far outweigh supply in coming years even with all exiting fields converting to synthetic to allow higher usage. This report identified Bob Campbell Oval as a potential synthetic field.

 

Council’s 2018-2021 Delivery Program and Operation Plan included an action to develop a synthetic playing surface at Bob Campbell Oval including consideration of the provision of walkways, off-leash areas and amenities / car parks.

 

In 2018 Council commenced discussions on the development of a new Master Plan for Bob Campbell Oval. The Greenwich Sports Club nominated the following features for the new Master Plan:-

·    Improved lighting;

·    Increased parking;

·    New club house with BBQ facilities;

·    Off-leash dog walking area; and

·    Playground, BBQ and picnic facilities near the foreshore.

 

Following these discussions, the initial Master Plan shown in AT-2 was developed. The matter was not further progressed at the time as funding options were to be developed.

 

Discussion

 

In 2019, Council unsuccessfully applied for a grant to implement the Master Plan under the NSW Department of Planning, Environment and Industry (DPEI) Precinct Support Scheme linked to the St Leonards/Crows Nest 2036 plan. The Scheme is designed to fund upfront, infrastructure to accommodate the future needs of the precinct.

 

In 2020 Council again applied for a grant which included a further revised Master Plan AT- 3 that included a Shared User Path connecting Bob Campbell Oval to St Leonards along River Road. This revised plan included the following: -

 

·    Amenities building;

·    Dedicated off leash dog areas;

·    Improved lighting;

·    Increased car parking capacity;

·    Perimeter running track;

·    Picnic areas, playground facilities and fitness equipment;

·    Shared User Path connecting Bob Campbell Oval to Greenwich Road; and

·    Synthetic field for soccer and junior cricket.

 

Council was ultimately successful in being awarded a $3,623,023 grant under the St Leonards/Crows Nest Precinct Support Scheme in June 2020. 

 

While the DPEI was considering Council’s application, further discussions were held with the Greenwich Sports Club and Lane Cove Cricket Club which led to further improvements to the Master Plan which can be seen in AT- 4. A dimensioned version is included at AT- 5. The plans have also had regard to how the Greenwich Games would operate and based on the initial feedback the Greenwich Games can be accommodated within the proposed layout. Further detailed design will be undertaken in consultation with the organising committee.

 

The main features of the current revision are:-

 

Amenities Building

 

A new amenities building will provide change rooms, toilets, storage and barbeque facilities for users. Greenwich Sports Club would also prefer the inclusion of a meeting room if possible in lieu of a canteen. if budget permits. Detail design of the building will occur in due course.

 

Car Park

 

The existing carpark area will be expanded from the current 33 car spaces to over 50 car spaces.

 

Leash-Free Dog Area

 

Dog walkers will have approximately 4,800m2 of fenced (including a fence to the car park but not for the creek boundary and western cliff face) leash-free area around the perimeter of the sports field that will be accessible 7 days per week. Under the current arrangement at Bob Campbell Oval. leash-free dog walking is not permitted when the oval is used for training or game days. The main leash-free area will be 47.9m long by 50.2m wide and along the western side it will be 96m long and 18.7m wide. This allows dog walkers ample room to throw balls for their dogs, walk leash free around the perimeter track, or let the dogs engage with equipment (similar to Blackman Park) at the northern end.

 

When compared to Blackman Park Dog Park which has 3,300m2, Bob Campbell Oval will have over 1,500m2 of additional permanent off-leash dog area.

 

Netball Training Court

 

The Greenwich Sport Club includes netball teams, however there are no netball facilities in Greenwich. This means that all netball games and training are undertaken in Willoughby or North Sydney.

 

The proposed Master Plan includes an area in the car park that will be setup as a dedicated netball court and cordoned off for netball practice during the week when parking demand is low and converted to a car park on weekends when parking demand is high.

 

Picnic Area, Playground and exercise equipment

 

The playground is proposed to be relocated from the rear of the reserve (northern end) to the foreshore so that users can enjoy views of Gore Bay and is more easily accessible. New Picnic shelters, barbeques and exercise equipment will be installed that will provide a variety of activities for varying age groups.

 

Perimeter Walking Track

 

A Shared User Path / perimeter walking track will be provided to allow for further exercise options and to provide the opportunity for bi-directional movement of users. Council has installed these tracks at Blackman Park and Mindarie Park which have proven to be very popular.

 


 

Synthetic Sports Field

 

As outlined earlier in the report. due to the rocky subsoil and lack of solar access during the winter months Council is unable to maintain an adequate coverage of turf on the field. The only way that Council can provide a consistent playing surface is by converting the sports field to synthetic. The synthetic surface has been limited to the size of a rectangular soccer field, which provides additional room for passive recreation and dog walking in the reserve outside this area. Junior cricket will also be accommodated within the soccer field.

 

This project is based on the design of the Blackman Park synthetic fields which remains a benchmark in sportsgrounds on the North Shore. The new field will incorporate a number of design changes which will ensure that the infill material remains on the field and does not leave the fenced area.

 

Shared User Path

 

Currently Bob Campbell Oval has no safe pedestrian access. The Master Plan proposes a Shared User Path (SUP) down St Vincents Road which will provide safe pedestrian access and a designated entry point to the reserve.  The path will extend from Bob Campbell Oval to St Leonards along River Road

 

An area analysis of the Master Plan has been broken down into the use plan shown in AT- 6 which illustrates the areas available for different users. 

 

The table below also shows the allocation of space for each user group. 

 

User Group

Space

Carparking

51 spaces

Cricket / Soccer

5376 m2

Passive Recreation / Dog walking

4800 m2

Netball – training area

435 m2

Passive Recreation / Picnic and Playground

1716 m2

 

Council will be undertaking additional investigations and analysis of the proposed Master Plan before the commencement of a formal community consultation process. It is envisaged that the community consultation will commence in September 2020.

 

Community Consultation

 

Statement of Intent

 

The consultation is designed to seek feedback from potential users of the upgraded Sportsfield and surrounds to help guide the final design solution.  Any comments received will be reviewed and evaluated to aid in finalising the design for the park.

 

Method

 

Level of Participation

Inform

Consult

Consult

Form of Participation

Open

Targeted

Open

Target Audience

Lane Cove Community

Residents adjoining the facility

Local Community and Sporting groups, sports associations

Proposed Medium

Public Exhibition,

Website Exhibition and Survey, eNewsletter and Social Media

 

Notification Letters and

Brochure / Letterbox Drop

 

Notification Letters

Indicative Timing

 (September 2020 – October 2020)

 (September 2020 – October 2020)

 (September 2020 – October 2020)

 

Conclusion

 

Council has been developing options for the upgrade of Bob Campbell Oval since 2018. Staff have developed a series of Master Plans to refine the proposal before undertaking community consultation. The Master Plan responds to and accommodates the various uses the space is currently used for and will ensure a safe, quality sporting field is available.

 

The DPEI introduced Precinct Support Scheme grant of $3,623,023, provides a funding mechanism for Council to deliver the Master Plan. This is the largest grant Council has ever received.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.     The Draft Bob Campbell Oval Master Plan be endorsed for public exhibition and consultation be undertaken for 6 weeks in accordance with the Consultation Strategy outlined in the report; and

2.     A further report be submitted to Council following the exhibition period to consider the final Bob Campbell Oval Master Plan for adoption.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Terescenko

Executive Manager - Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Bob Campbell Oval - quality of fields - aerial images

1 Page

 

AT‑2View

Bob Campbell Oval - Draft Masterplan 2018

1 Page

 

AT‑3View

Bob Campbell Oval - Draft Masterplan - 2019 submission

1 Page

 

AT‑4View

Bob Campbell Oval - Draft Masterplan 2020

1 Page

 

AT‑5View

Bob Campbell Oval - Dimensions

1 Page

 

AT‑6View

Bob Campbell Oval - User Groups

1 Page

 

 

 


ATTACHMENT 1

Bob Campbell Oval - quality of fields - aerial images

 

PDF Creator


ATTACHMENT 2

Bob Campbell Oval - Draft Masterplan 2018

 

PDF Creator


ATTACHMENT 3

Bob Campbell Oval - Draft Masterplan - 2019 submission

 

PDF Creator


ATTACHMENT 4

Bob Campbell Oval - Draft Masterplan 2020

 

PDF Creator


ATTACHMENT 5

Bob Campbell Oval - Dimensions

 

PDF Creator


ATTACHMENT 6

Bob Campbell Oval - User Groups

 

PDF Creator


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2020

MWOO and FOGO Waste Processing

 

 

Subject:          MWOO and FOGO Waste Processing     

Record No:    SU5393 - 39903/20

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):      Craig Wrightson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council has been advised that the Environment Protection Authority (EPA) has granted a 5-year exemption to the Woodlawn Waste Processing site to allow it to resume processing of the red bin mixed waste to create MWOO. Simultaneously, the EPA announced an uncontestable grant program for councils utilising MWOO of $180,000 per council to trial and conduct research into FOGO (Food Organics and Garden Organics) collections. It is recommended that Council, along with other members of the Northern Sydney Waste Alliance, seek a grant to trial and conduct research into FOGO.

 

Background

 

On 1 July 2017 a new ‘Red Bin’ Waste Processing Facility commenced at the old Woodlawn Mine site (near Goulburn).

 

The $100 million waste processing facility at the Woodlawn Eco-precinct was delivered by Veolia and transforms waste into useful compost (known as MWOO) for environmental rehabilitation of the former mine site. The facility is supplied with red-lid bin waste from 11 Sydney Councils, including five Northern Sydney Council members of NSROC (Hunter’s Hill, Ku-ring-gai, Lane Cove, Ryde and Willoughby – together known as the Northern Sydney Waste Alliance), the Northern Sydney Waste Alliance.

 

The site began operation after more than five years of work by Veolia to gain EPA approval for the facility and the product to be created by the processing service. Despite this, in October 2018 the EPA banned the application of MWOO to agricultural land due to risks associated with chemical and physical contaminants and called a halt to the application of MWOO to mine sites, pending further research.

 

Council at its meeting of 17 October 2019 considered a Mayoral Minute - Update on EPA's review of MWOO - Red Bin Processing to Compost. At the time the EPA had revoked its approval to allow the Woodlawn facility to process Red Bin Waste to create compost for distribution on the site as part of the mine remediation.  Council resolved:- 

 

1.            The Mayoral Minute be received and noted;

2.            Council staff continue to work with NSROC and SSROC to seek a resolution to the EPA ban particularly in respect of the application of the processed MWOO to the remediation of the copper tailings dam at the Woodlawn site;

3.            The Mayor write to the relevant Minister, and copy our local State member, to highlight our concerns;

4.            Council inform the community via email, the website and social media that public submissions can be made to the NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA) public consultation on the future use of general household waste, including Mixed Waste Organic Outputs (“MWOO” or “the material”) and that the consultation closes on the 28th November 2019;

5.            Encourage residents to make submissions supporting the use of MWOO on mine rehabilitation sites; and

6.            Notify residents that the NSW EPA is holding a public briefing on the future use of household waste and on Mixed Waste Organic Outputs (MWOO) on Tuesday 29 October 2:00pm – 4:00pm in Sydney’s CBD and online.

 

Discussion

 

Consistent with Council’s and the Northern Sydney Waste Alliance’s position, the EPA has now issued a five-year licence to Veolia, the owner of the Woodlawn facility, to allow the processing of waste for application to land previously used as a tailings dam on the mine site to recommence from 1 July, 2020. This will ensure Council’s current diversion of waste from landfill strategy can continue. Veolia has confirmed they have commenced processing the waste for use in the filling of the copper tailings dam on the site.  This is a major breakthrough in that the requirements to recover resources from putrescible waste for the whole 10-year initial term of Council’s contract can be fulfilled.

 

Simultaneously the EPA has announced a grants program to encourage councils who supply waste to produce MWOO to transition to FOGO (Food and Organics) collection collected by including it in the Green Waste Bin or through separate food organics collection. It is proposed that Council in conjunction with the other North Shore councils which participate in the MWOO contract, apply for the grants to conduct pilot projects.

 

The EPA prefers FOGO as the policy for diversion from landfill in respect of the red-lid general waste bin on the basis that comingled food and garden organics to make compost can produce a compost material that is suitable for some forms of agriculture, while MWOO compost is limited to use as a fill material for contaminated land under the revised regulatory position taken by the EPA.  

While the EPA is encouraging councils to transition to food and garden organics collection, contamination is also a key issue for FOGO due to its intended use. MWOO production from the red-lid bin has lower contamination rates under the existing regulation than those applying to comingled food and garden organics, and no impact on the existing green bin-produced waste stream to produce compost.

 

Simultaneously the EPA has announced a grants program to encourage councils who supply waste to produce MWOO to transition to FOGO (Food and Organics) collection collected by including it in the Green Waste Bin or through separate food organics collection. It is proposed that Council in conjunction with the other councils which participate in the MWOO contract, apply for the grants to conduct pilot projects.

 

The EPA prefers FOGO as the policy for diversion from landfill in respect of the red-lid general waste bin on the basis that comingled food and garden organics can produce a compost material that is suitable for some forms of agriculture, while MWOO compost is limited to use as a fill material for contaminated land under the revised regulatory position taken by the EPA.

While the EPA is encouraging councils to transition to food and garden organics collection, contamination is also a key issue for FOGO due to its intended use. MWOO production from the red-lid bin has no impact on the existing green bin-produced compost and has lower contamination rates under the revised regulation than those applying to comingled food and garden organics.

 

The EPA, in support of its position has released an analysis of existing FOGO trials/operations by consultants, Rawtec. The Rawtec report includes results from across 38 non-metropolitan areas collecting comingled food and garden organics. The results were wide-ranging with respect to the total volume of food in the FOGO bin, averaging 1.45 kgs (range from 0.17 to 7.3 kgs) and to the total of all food in any bin, averaging 3.3 kgs per household per week (range: 1.29 to 9.99 kgs).

The Rawtec report and analysis included limited data on multi-unit dwellings and in the recommendations, the report states:-

 

“The 2012 audit guidelines state, “Any MUD greater than a three storey walk up should be excluded from the analysis as the methodology expressed in these Guidelines is not suitable.”

Council staff made enquiries with Penrith Council, the only Sydney metropolitan Council collecting mixed food and garden organics as a permanent service. Penrith advised that they do not provide FOGO collection to any property with greater than 12 units, as the quality of the material makes it unsuitable for compost production due to contamination. Penrith further advised that it has taken 12 years intensive waste education and full-time staff members whose role is to reduce contamination rates across all other dwelling types from 35-40% to an average of 3% that it now claims to achieve.

 

The range of results in the EPA/Rawtec analysis means that the food per household data should be used with caution, as the per household averages in the Sydney metropolitan area, which has 30 to 50% multi-unit dwellings (smaller average household size), are likely to be lower than in the single unit, non-Sydney areas forming the source of the audits reviewed in the Rawtec report. To allow for this, in the attached analysis upper-end assumptions were used to create the table, that is, that 40% of total volume in Alliance red-lid bins is food and that if a FOGO bin was available in houses and townhouses, 70% of all food would be deposited into it in a non-contaminated state.

The Northern Sydney Waste Alliance has undertaken analysis for participating councils which is summarised in the following table.

 

MWOO vs FOGO for the Waste Alliance (for background notes refer to AT-1)

 

MWOO Processing

FOGO

Hybrid MWOO & FOGO

 

a. Limited Capacity (Contract)

b. All Waste (MBT capacity 100%)

c. Rawtec report Average Rates

d. Rawtec report Average Rates

e. Alliance FOGO Upper rates

f. Alliance Organics Collected

 

All Residential

All Residential

All Residential

R2 and R3 Only

R2 and R3 Only

MWOO from MUDs

FOGO from R2 and R3

1. No. Households

139,386

139,386

139,386

94,153

94,153

139,386

2. Processing (tonnes pa)

33,000

77,000

10,510

7,099

14,563

33,000

3. Green Waste (tonnes pa)

38,694

38,694

38,694

38,694

38,694

38,694

4. Total Red Bin Waste available for Processing (tonnes pa)

77,000

77,000

66,490

69,901

62,437

77,000

5. Red Bin Diversion, MWOO produced @ 50% efficiency (tonnes pa)

16,500

38,500

-

-

-

16,500

6. Food Diversion @ max Rawtec rpt rate (tonnes pa)

-

-

10,510

7,099

14,563

14,563

Total Diverted 3 + 5 + 6

55,194

77,194

49,204

45,793

53,257

69,757

Residual to Landfill

60,500

38,500

66,490

69,901

62,437

45,937

Total Diversion

48%

67%

43%

40%

46%

60%

 

The table indicates that under the current MWOO contract provisions 33,000 tonnes p.a. of red bin mixed waste is processed (capped due to Woodlawn capacity limits), and when combined with existing green waste, 48% of total waste is diverted from landfill. If the Woodlawn facility was expanded so that all Alliance mixed waste (77,000 tonnes p.a.) could be processed, this would boost diversion to 67%. This is significantly more than the potential from FOGO processing. For FOGO, based on the high point averages from the Rawtec report (total food of 4.2kgs per household per week and 70% (2.9 kgs per hh/week being placed in the FOGO bin), diversion of 43% could be expected. If collection of comingled waste was only from houses and townhouses, which generally contain higher proportions of food waste and green waste per dwelling, the diversion rate could be reasonably estimated to be 46%. Overall, this means. however, that FOGO would result in decreased diversion from landfill compared to the existing MWOO solution.

 

On the basis of this analysis, the availability of more capacity to produce MWOO would be the best possible solution to maximise resource recovery and minimise landfill. Under the current contract that capacity is not available, but discussions with Veolia senior management are ongoing as to their future plans for Woodlawn facilities. The next of these discussions will take place on 4 August at the Waste Alliance Board meeting with the CEO of Veolia. Council’s contract with Veolia is to December 2025 with a five-year extension option.

 

In the meantime, to take advantage of the grant program being offered by the EPA to councils affected by the decision to limit MWOO application to land to specifically licensed sites, Waste Alliance councils are planning to undertake local research to improve the quality of data available about the potential environmental benefits of collecting food or comingled food and garden waste in metropolitan Sydney.

 

Food organics (not garden) is the principal organic waste stream available from multi-unit dwellings, so it makes sense to examine whether a FOGO service to houses and town houses only (R2 and R3 zones) could work, as in these dwelling types residents are able to control segregation and both food and garden organics are generated.

 

Based on the table, a hybrid model, where food collected from units remains in the red-lid bin as a mixed waste stream processed into MWOO and a comingled (green bin) food and garden organics is collected from houses and townhouses for FOGO processing could be a positive solution, in the absence of more MWOO processing capacity.

 

Such a combination, if contamination rates were low, would result in 60% diversion, even if the Alliance contract capacity remains constrained to 33,000 tonnes.

 

To explore the potential for such hybrid arrangement, trials conducted to determine practical issues and what environmental benefits ensued compared to other alternatives are being planned as the basis of the EPA grant application. Also as part of the project, research on in-home food preparation, amounts of take-away and eating out food consumption would be beneficial, to determine what quantities of food waste could be available for a comingled bin. This research would also seek information on community attitudes to increased efforts to separate FOGO would be beneficial, so that the impediments to collecting sufficient volumes of useable food waste are identified ahead of any decision to change waste collection options.

 

The Northern Sydney Waste Alliance is considering:-

a.   A regional project for submission by Alliance Councils acting as a group to the EPA under the Grant Program.

b.   Trials to determine comparative outcomes in relation to landfill diversion, cost, and compliance for: -

·     Food and garden organics comingled collection from houses and townhouses;

·     Food organics collections from units; and

·     Comparison to include relative recovery benefits of MWOO and other compost outcomes.

c.   Variables in collection approach to be modelled in trials according to each council’s preferred model for testing.

d.   Pooling funds to ensure that a substantial scale project, with robust survey design alternatives for testing, can be undertaken, potentially the full allocation of $180,000 per council.

e.   Core variables to be measured: compliance levels (food share correctly segregated), contamination percentages and volume of collections, applying a consistent methodology, to enable comparison of landfill diversion rates from varying trial approaches.                       

f.    Areas for trial to be for all residences under the particular model being tested (not opt-in)

g.   Variables that could be applied differently in LGAs:-

•        Efficacy (cost and practicality of distribution) of different collection containers (household containers suitable for separate small bin or suitable for comingled bin; drop off containers);

•        Impact of incentives (incentives such as discount to DWMC for opting in to food separation, voucher rewards for drop offs);

•        Disposal options (local, small scale composting; delivered to large-scale WM facility);

•        Communications/education approach;

•        Collection frequency (weekly vs fortnightly);

•        Bin size; and

•        Impact/contribution on the circular economy.

h.   Trials to take into account alternative futures with respect to ongoing MWOO potential at Woodlawn, new facilities in the pipeline, EPA policy and industry investment intentions.

Also as part of the project, research on in-home food preparation, amounts of take-away and eating out food consumption would be beneficial, to determine what quantities of food waste could be available for a comingled bin. This research would also seek information on community attitudes to increased efforts to separate FOGO would be beneficial, so that the impediments to collecting sufficient volumes of useable food waste are identified ahead of any decision to change waste collection options.

 

Work is currently underway to develop five projects, with the aim that each of the five Waste Alliance Councils will undertake a different approach to testing how to increase organics collection, with a project management resource to be funded by a grant to NSROC. These grant applications are due to be submitted by 11 August.

 

Pilot projects will be conducted in 2021, with consistent research design to ensure that the resulting data is reliable and can be consolidated into a data set that allows the Waste Alliance Councils to make evidence-based decisions about the best way to deal with putrescible waste after the current contract concludes in 2025.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

1.    The report be received and noted; and

2.    Council in conjunction with other members of the Northern Sydney Waste Alliance, seek an EPA grant to trial and conduct research into FOGO.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Notes to MWOO/FOGO analysis

1 Page

 

 

 


ATTACHMENT 1

Notes to MWOO/FOGO analysis

 

PDF Creator


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2020

Petition calling for limit to height and density controls in the Mowbray Precinct

 

 

Subject:          Petition calling for limit to height and density controls in the Mowbray Precinct    

Record No:    SU1802 - 39799/20

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):      Michael Mason 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council has received a petition calling for Council to ensure that development standards are treated as upper limits rather than discretionary limits.

 

The petition cites examples, particularly in the Mowbray Precinct, where applications, both current and historical, have requested concessions to height and density under State provisions (Clause 4.6 of the Act) for residential flat developments.

 

Each example cited by the petition is examined and the current status as to approval, refusal or amendment is provided.

 

A number of the examples are currently under appeal to the Land and Environment Court.  These examples provide detail of the applications and the current status only. 

 

Unfortunately, the reality is that various mechanisms including State Environmental Planning Policies and Clause 4.6 variations, which enable an applicant to seek a breach of a development standard, are available to all applicants and Council Staff are required to assess such requests, having regard to rules, guidelines and legal precedents when making recommendations for determinations under delegation or by an external Planning Panel. It is recommended that Council receive and note the petition and the head petitioner be informed of Council’s decision.

 

Background

 

Council has received a petition with 211 signatures (a copy of the petition wording is included as AT-1) calling for Council to ensure that development standards are treated as upper limits rather than discretionary limits.

 

The petition also calls for the height, bulk and density of developments to be reduced, especially on the change of zoning boundaries.

 

The petition cites a number of examples where they believe developments have been approved which are or would be “massively oversized”.

 

The head petitioner, Mr Guy Hallowes, is supported by a number of residents from the Mowbray Road residential Precinct and further afield areas, including Alexandria, Castle Hill and Epping.

 

Discussion

 

Development sites of particular concern are located in streets bounded by Willandra to the west, Mindarie to the north, Merinda to the south and Pinaroo and Hatfield to the east.  However, the petition also expresses concern more broadly.

 

Generally, this area forms some of the last remaining high density sites in the Mowbray Road Precinct.  The area has a diverse and fragmented ownership pattern, characterized by long term owners, public housing authorities and recently acquired Council land rezoned for open space to accommodate growing demand for high quality and accessible open space that caters for the needs of this growing residential precinct.

 

An overview of each site listed 1-6 is provided below to add context to the issues raised by the petition.

 

 

 

Part Layout Plan Lane Cove North- Source Council’s GIS

 

Legend:

 

1.   47 Mindarie Street (DA105/2019 – Boarding House)

2.   51 Mindarie Street (DA 106/2019 – Boarding house)

3.   49 Mindarie Street

4.   34 Mindarie Street

5.   20-22 Mindarie Street and 30 Pinaroo Place

6.   1-7 Merinda Street and 11-17 Willandra Place.

 

The current status of the above sites is as follows.

 

·    47 Mindarie Street (DA105/2019 – Boarding House)

 

The proposed development is for the demolition of an existing dwelling house and construction of a six storey Boarding House under the provisions of State Environmental Planning Policy (Affordable Rental Housing) 2009.  The proposed development is within the 17.5m LEP height limit with the exception of the lift overrun.  The application was considered by Council’s Local Planning Panel and refused due to the application is not being compatible with the existing environmental character of the locality and currently subject to an appeal in the Land and Environment Court awaiting Court hearing in October 2020.


 

·    51 Mindarie Street (DA 106/2019 – Boarding house)

 

The proposed development is for the demolition of an existing dwelling house and construction of a six storey Boarding House under the provisions of State Environmental Planning Policy (Affordable Rental Housing) 2009.  The proposed development is within the 17.5m LEP height limit. This application is also currently subject to an appeal in the Land and Environment Court and will be heard along with the appeal for 47 Mindarie above in October 2020.

 

·    49 Mindarie Street

There exists a two-storey dwelling house on the site. In the event the two adjoining development applications DA105/2019 and DA 106/2019 mentioned above, are approved by the Land and Environment Court and built, this site would become isolated.

 

·    34 Mindarie Street

 

Council staff considered a development application DA86/2017 at 30-32 Mindarie Street for the demolition of an existing dwelling houses and construction of a Residential Flat Building. The application was considered by Council’s Independent Hearing and Assessment Panel and was refused on a number of grounds which included isolation of the two properties directly to the east and west of the subject site – No. 28 Mindarie Street and No. 34 Mindarie Street (respectively). The application was subject to an appeal in the Land and Environment Court and the Court approved the application. In the event the Residential Flat building is built there is potential for the two properties to be isolated. It may be noted, however, that 28 Mindarie Street has been purchased by the developer of the Residential Flat building at 30-32 Mindarie Street and may become included in a new Residential Flat Building application.

 

·    20-22 Mindarie Street and 30 Pinaroo Place (DA50/2019)

 

Council considered a Stage 1 concept development application for the construction of a residential flat building. The owner of site is NSW Land and Housing Corporation. The application was assessed against the relevant provisions of Lane Cove Local Environmental Plan. The proposal did not comply with the maximum building height of 17.5m.  A maximum 20.07m was proposed. The proposal was accompanied by a clause 4.6 written request seeking to vary the development standard. The application was referred to Sydney North Planning Panel with a recommendation for approval. The  Panel deferred the determination pending additional information. The applicant subsequently provided the additional information. The Panel further deferred the determination pending still further information. The applicant is considering their options.

 

·    1-7 Merinda Street and 11-17 Willandra Place (DA162/2018).

 

Council considered a development application for demolition of existing structures and construction of a residential flat building development for 105 dwellings. The proposed development breached the 17.5m height limit by 2.4m. The proposal was accompanied by a clause 4.6 written request seeking to vary the development standard.

 

The applicant lodged an amending application which as originally submitted, sought to increase the building height as well as the floor area of the upper level.  Staff raised concerns with the applicant on these components of the proposal. The applicant amended the proposed development to ensure no additional height to that already approved. The proposed additional floor area at the upper level was deleted and only a marginal increase in floor area in the basement which was supported given that the increase in floor area would not result in any additional bulk and scale and would provide significant amenity benefits to future occupants.

 

The application was considered by Council’s Local Planning Panel at its 7 July meeting and approved subject to conditions.

 

The Stringybark Creek Residents Association, has over a number of years, provided comment and submissions to many developments.   In recent years submissions have focused on Residential Flat Building developments.  Such comments, although not always concurred with, are well considered, seek to protect the existing environment and residential amenity.

 

Equally, staff are obliged to assess applications having regard to State and Local planning controls and guidelines.

 

At the heart of the petition, is the call for Council to ensure that (Lane Cove) development standards are treated as upper limits rather than discretionary limits.

 

The uncomfortable reality is that the various exceptions, in the form of State Environmental Planning Policies, such as SEPP (Affordable Rental Housing), Boarding Houses and provisions of Clause 4.6, which enable an applicant to seek a breach of a development standard, are available to all applicants and Council Staff are required to assess such requests, having regard to rules, guidelines and legal precedents when making recommendations for determinations under delegation or by an external Planning Panel.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:

1.       The petition be received and noted; and

2.       The Head Petitioner be provided with a copy of this report outlining the context and environment in which Council must assess applications.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Petition from Residents of Mowbray Precinct

1 Page

 

 

 


ATTACHMENT 1

Petition from Residents of Mowbray Precinct

 

PDF Creator


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2020

Finalisation of the Draft Playground Strategy

 

 

Subject:          Finalisation of the Draft Playground Strategy    

Record No:    SU7996 - 38501/20

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Helen Haigh 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council engaged a consultant to undertake a review and update the 2008 Playground Strategy. The strategy covers the playground hierarchy, guidelines for playground design and management and a proposed 5-year Playground Replacement Program. At the April 2020 Council meeting it was resolved to adopt the Draft Playground Strategy for purpose of public exhibition. The public exhibition went for 6 weeks from 13 May until 24 June 2020. Thirty-six (36) submissions have been received. Minor amendments have been made to this document following community consultation and the Playground Strategy is now presented to Council for adoption.

 

Background

 

Council resolved at its meeting 20 April 2020 that:-

 

1.   Council adopt the Draft Playground Strategy dated April 2020 for the purposes of public exhibition;

2.   The Draft Playground Strategy be placed on public exhibition for 6 weeks in accordance with the Consultation Strategy outlined in the report; and

     3.    A further report is submitted to Council following the exhibition period to consider the final Playground Strategy for adoption.

 

Discussion

 

The strategy was placed on public exhibition for six (6) weeks from 13th May to 24th June 2020.  The consultation strategy involved the following:-

 

·    E-newsletter (April 2020);

·    Online ‘Have Your Say’ to the Draft Playground Strategy;

·    Facebook post to notify community of ‘Have Your Say’; and

·    Signs at all 48 playgrounds.

 

Thirty-six (36) submissions were received in total. Four (4) were from community groups and thirty-one (31) from individuals. The community groups included Lane Cove Bushland and Conservation Society (LCBCS), The Northwood Action Group Inc (NAG), Greenwich Community Association Inc (GCA) and the Bushland Management Advisory Committee (BMAC).

 

Bob Campbell Oval playground and Shaw Playground received a higher number of specific comments than other playgrounds.

 

Bob Campbell Oval

 

Eight (8) comments were received for Bob Campbell Oval (BCO). A separate report to Council has been prepared to this meeting with the scheduled timeframe for this specific project.  A Masterplan will be displayed for community consultation which will include a playground consultation component for the community to have their say on the play elements and themes. 

 

Shaw playground

 

Four submissions were also received for Shaw Playground. Concern was raised over an option presented at the May 2020 Council meeting which stated:

 

Option 2: Provide a new dedicated dog park at Shaw Playground at a cost of $44,500. If Council wished to pursue the Shaw Playground option further consultation on a design for the park is recommended.

 

Council resolved to defer the matter to a Councillor workshop. This option was discussed at the workshop however was not supported. Therefore, no further action on this matter will be taken.

 

Summary of comments

 

A summary comments raised with responses is detailed below.

 

Issue

Number of Submissions

Response

Accessibility for all ages / Inclusion / Multi-age equipment

7

Strategy is to include community from the design stage through engaging in Community Consultation (Section 6.7) and planning for Access and Inclusion (Section 6.5).

Bushland proximity to playgrounds

4

Strategy has incorporated the wording in Environmental Considerations (Section 6.9) to include reference to the Bushland Plan of Management and consultation with the Bushland Co-ordinator when designing adjacent to bushland.

Nature Play 

 

4

Strategy has incorporated reference to ‘nature play’ in Section 6.4: Play Value.

Fencing of playgrounds

3

Strategy is to fence playgrounds on busy roads as a priority; with fencing at other playgrounds considered on a case by case basis. (Section 6.6)

Shade

 

2

Strategy is to use the design and setting of playgrounds to locate facilities near existing shade providing features such as trees, or the planting of new trees. Other shade structures over playgrounds will be used in exceptional circumstances and on a site by site basis, and then only at larger neighbourhood and district playgrounds. Where shade structures are deemed necessary, consideration should be given to integrating them with other park shelters and picnic facilities. (Section 6.8)

Teenagers

 

2

Strategy has been amended to incorporate reference to this age bracket in Section 6.7: Community Consultation to ensure teenagers are engaged from the start of the design phase.

Noise

 

2

Addition of noise has been included in Environmental Considerations (Section 6.9). Proximity to neighbouring houses and other land use is taken into account at the design and location stage.  Elements for the playground are chosen accordingly.

Planting & Community Gardens

 

2

Strategy includes planting in 6.4 play Value, 6.6 Masterplans and 6.8 Sun Exposure. Community Gardens will be considered by Council if space is available and the proponents have the resources available to manage it. 

Community safety

2

Strategy incorporates this in Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) principles in Section 6.3 - Community Safety.

Under cover play areas

1

This not something offered / considered by Council due to costs. Section 6.8 addresses shade provisions for playgrounds.

Sandpit

 

1

Prior to 2019 Lane Cove did not have any sandspits in playground areas. Sandpits are now in 3 playgrounds.

Scooter park

 

1

Blackman Park does offer this facility.  Space is a limiting factor for this type of activity within the Local Government Area.

Sensory play

1

Strategy incorporates this in Play Value (Section 6.4).

Herbicides

 

1

No chemical herbicides are used around playgrounds.  An organic herbicide is used in these sensitive areas. Pesticide notification in these sensitive areas is carried out under the Pesticide Notification Plan 2019.

Artwork

1

Strategy is to consider and actively pursue the integration of artwork in playgrounds. It is acknowledged that significant artwork would be most appropriate for larger playground installations where there may be the resources to employ an artist to work alongside the playground designer.

Lighting

1

Strategy is to assess lighting at the District Playground Masterplan level (Section 6.6 Masterplans). Playgrounds are generally not lit due to proximity of neighbours (residents and bushland).

Dogs off - lead

1

No dogs are permitted within 10m of playground. Companions Animals Act 1998 Sections 13 & 14. This is enforced by Council’s Rangers.

Nearest toilet signage

1

This information can be found on the National Public Toilet Map https://toiletmap.gov.au/

 

Comments and requests were made for specific playgrounds.  The comments and requests will be addressed when the playground is due for renewal or replacement as part of the community consultation process.

 

Specific playgrounds that were referred to are shown in the table below.


 

Playground

number of comments

Playground

number of comments

Bob Campbell Oval

8

Coxs Lane

1

Shaw Playground

4

Nichols Reserve

1

Hughes Park

4

Kimberley Playground

1

Pottery Green

3

Charlish Playground

1

Blackman Park

3

Woodford Bay

1

Mindarie Park

3

Cullen St

1

Stringybark Reserve

2

Finlayson Park

1

Leemon Reserve

2

Central Park

1

The Canopy

2

Shell Park

1

Bill Bryan playground (KSO)

2

Best St Reserve

1

Longueville Park

2

Helen St Reserve

1

St Vincents Playground

1

Sydney Cowell

1

 

Specific amendments

 

Having taken on feedback from the community, specific amendments that have been made are displayed in the table below. 

 

The updated Playground Strategy is attached at AT-1.

 

Page/Section

Amendment

Section 1.3

Addition of words. Designed and located to compliment, enhance and celebrate the unique qualities, such as visual character and scenic qualities of each park location.

Section 2.2

Removal of Open Space Signage Concepts 2012

Addition of Community Engagement Policy under key documents

Corrected name of Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2017 - 2021

Section 3.4

Hierarchy of Bob Campbell Oval playground corrected from District to Neighbourhood playground.

Section 6.4

Addition of reference to Nature Play, planting and sensory development.

Section 6.6

Masterplans - whole park design. Addition of sentence for Bushland. Playground location must also consider proximity to Bushland and potential impacts that may arise on local fauna and flora.

Section 6.6

Masterplans – whole park design. Addition of ‘lighting’ to the list of components to assess when carrying out a whole park plan.

Section 6.7

Community Consultation – more specific wording has been added to include an example of the type of targeted audiences that would be included at the consultation process.  A correction has been made to the wording of Community Engagement Policy.

Section 6.9

Environmental Considerations – addition of sentence ‘Local Government is also accountable for impacts on neighbouring land uses such as residents and bushland.’

Section 6.9

Environmental Considerations – addition of impact to consider ‘Noise levels generated during construction and post construction from play elements.’

Section 6.9

Environmental Considerations – addition of paragraph for Bushland. Consideration of playground location and its proximity to Bushland must adhere to the Lane Cove Bushland Plan of Management. Consideration must be given to plant species within the playground, noise created, light levels, rubbish generated and access to bushland.  Councils Co-ordinator – Bushland must be consulted during the planning stages as part of stakeholder consultation.

 

Conclusion

 

The community has had the opportunity to comment on the draft Playground Strategy. The submissions have been reviewed and changes, as noted above, have been made to the document. The Playground Strategy is now recommended for adoption by Council.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council adopt the Playground Strategy dated July 2020 as attached at AT-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Terescenko

Executive Manager - Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Playground Strategy 2020

41 Pages

 

 

 


ATTACHMENT 1

Playground Strategy 2020

 

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Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2020

Interaction Upgrades – Installation of Traffic Signal at two locations

 

 

Subject:          Interaction Upgrades – Installation of Traffic Signal at two locations    

Record No:    SU1326 - 38489/20

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Sashika Perera 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council has been working with Transport for NSW (TfNSW) to obtain approval for the construction of two traffic signal projects in the Local Government Area. The two projects are the River Road West/Longueville Road/Northwood Road intersection upgrade and the Burns Bay Road/Tambourine Bay Road/Coxs Lane intersection upgrade. Final approval from TfNSW has been granted for construction. The procurement process is currently in progress, which when finalised, will allow works to commence later in 2020, and finalised by early 2021. It is recommended the report be received and noted.

 

Background

 

River Road West/Longueville Road/Northwood Road Intersection Upgrade

 

The traffic lights at the intersection of River Road West/Longueville Road/Northwood Road have been the location of regular vehicle crashes, primarily due to the unusual intersection alignment. Council has been working with TfNSW to develop a proposal to improve the safety of this intersection, included as AT-1, and involves:-

 

·    The introduction of a right turn movement from Longueville Road into River Road West for general traffic; and

 

·    To reinforce that Longueville Road acts a side street to this intersection, it will be realigned so that it enters the intersection at a right angle. This in turn will exaggerate the right turn movement from Northwood Road into Longueville Road to reinforce its status as a side road and ensure that the movement from Northwood Road into River Road West is the main through movement for this intersection.

 

On 7 February 2019 the NSW Government announced a $1 Million grant towards the upgrade of this intersection, with Council providing matching funding to allow the project to proceed. Post completion further analysis will be undertaken to identify whether further change are required.

 

Burns Bay Road/Tambourine Bay Road/Coxs Lane Intersection Upgrade

 

The intersection of Burns Bay Road/Tambourine Bay Road/Coxs Lane has an existing roundabout. Council regularly receives complaints regarding near misses at this roundabout as pedestrians must negotiate traffic in many directions.

It is proposed to replace the roundabout with traffic signals, which will provide greater pedestrian safety. The signals will also assist in the management of traffic through the village and traffic associated with the opening of The Canopy, which includes the largest car park in the village.

The intersection upgrade will be completed in 2 stages. Stage 1 consists of the installation of the traffic signals and associated civil works. Stage 2 consists of the realignment of the Cox’s Lane.

TfNSW approval has been granted for Stage 1, Council will continue to develop the design for Stage 2. The plan for the proposed upgrade is shown in AT-2.

 

Discussion

 

The approval process for traffic signals requires sign off from three different departments within TfNSW at various stages of the design. While this has not always been a linear process, regular meetings between Council and TfNSW ensured a coordinated approach and assisted in addressing design comments in a timely manner.

 

Final sign off from TfNSW for both traffic signal projects was received in June 2020.

 

Given the alignment of the construction timeframe for both projects, it was decided to package the two projects in one construction tender. Tenders submissions closed on 6 July 2020, with Council receiving nine responses. To avoid further delays, following evaluation of the tenders by the assessment panel, a report will be prepared for the General Manager to award the contract to the successful tenderer under delegated authority. Council has included in the 2020/21 Budget funding for both projects.

 

Conclusion

 

Council received final approval from TfNSW in June 2020 for construction of the River Road West/Longueville Road/Northwood Road intersection upgrade and the Burns Bay Road/Tambourine Bay Road/Cos Lane intersection upgrade. Both upgrades will provide much improved safety at the intersections.

 

The packaging of the two traffic signal projects will deliver cost and co-ordination benefits. The tender will be awarded by the General Manager under delegated authority, to ensure the works commence without further delays.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Terescenko

Executive Manager - Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

River Road West/Longueville Road/Northwood Road Intersection Upgrade Civil Drawing

1 Page

 

AT‑2View

Burns Bay Road/Tambourine Bay Road/Coxs Lane Intersection Upgrade

1 Page

 

 

 


ATTACHMENT 1

River Road West/Longueville Road/Northwood Road Intersection Upgrade Civil Drawing

 

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ATTACHMENT 2

Burns Bay Road/Tambourine Bay Road/Coxs Lane Intersection Upgrade

 

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Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2020

Building Upgrade Finance – Improving Environmental Performance of Commercial Buildings

 

 

Subject:          Building Upgrade Finance – Improving Environmental Performance of Commercial Buildings    

Record No:    SU7704 - 36549/20

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):      Fiona McCleary 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Following the declaration of a Climate Emergency in September 2019, Council has been

investigating pathways to achieve Co2 emission and water reductions across LGA. As a result, in March 2020 Council endorsed the following emission and water targets:-

 

·    80% reduction in emissions by 2036 (FY16/17 emissions baseline); and

 

·    No net increase in water use by 2036 (FY16/17 water use baseline).

 

Council’s total emissions represent only 2% of the Lane Cove LGA emissions, while the non-residential sector totals 45%. Engaging with large asset owners and key stakeholders is crucial to achieving a significant reduction in energy emissions and water use across the community.

 

Building Upgrade Finance is a type of finance available to building owners to upgrade and improve the energy, water and environmental efficiency or sustainability of existing buildings. These upgrades include solar photovoltaic (PV), LED lighting, efficient air conditioning, wastewater treatment systems, water efficient fixtures and fittings and waste management systems.

 

In NSW, Building Upgrade Finance is provided by a third-party provider and is tied to an Environmental Upgrade Agreement. Council is party to the agreement and collects the repayments of behalf of the financier by levying through the rating system an environmental upgrade charge on the individual property in accordance with an agreed repayment schedule.  Environmental Upgrade Agreements are struck at a fixed rate of interest for repayment quarterly on dates that align with Council’s scheduled notice of rates. Council collects the environmental upgrade charge from the building owner and passes it onto the finance provider to repay the funds. This arrangement provides added security to the lender, as under NSW law when a property is sold Rates and Charges are settled as part of the transaction. It is important to note that under the Local Government Act, Council is never liable for any failure by a person to pay the charge, risk remains with the financier.

 

Building Upgrade Finance would provide Council with a framework and tools to help move towards its Emission Reduction targets and aligns with goals in the Delivery Program 2020-22 and Operational Plan 2020-21 by permitting building owners to spread capital cost over time. It is recommended that Council implement a Building Upgrade Finance program to non residential precincts across the LGA.

 

Background

 

The Building Upgrade Finance program provides owners of non-residential buildings (generally commercial and industrial) the opportunity to access funding to upgrade buildings and systems and install sustainable and energy saving infrastructure such as solar panels. The loan is repaid over time at competitive rates under an Environmental Upgrade Agreement administered by Council.

 

Through Building Upgrade Finance, Council, a building owner and a finance provider voluntarily enter into an Environmental Upgrade Agreement, where:-

 

·    The building owner undertakes building upgrade works and repays the finance through a quarterly local government charge, known as an Environmental Upgrade Charge (EUC);

 

·    The finance provider funds the upgrade works, and

 

·    the council levies the EUC against the land on which the building is situated through the rates system, and collects the quarterly repayments from the building owner, remitting the funds received to the finance provider.

 

Building Upgrade Finance has been specifically designed to overcome common barriers to financing environmental upgrades and bring forward investment that would result in an environmental improvement. These barriers include:-

 

·    Split incentives, whereby the building owner pays for the upgrade whilst the tenants benefit in reduced operating costs. Building Upgrade Finance enables the building owner to fairly share the costs and benefits with tenants; and

 

·    Financing, whereby environmental upgrades generally with longer payback periods (>2years) struggle to get capex funding. Building Upgrade Finance would provide a building owner with long term finance for projects that has an environmental benefit, increasing the likelihood that the resulting energy savings would cover the finance repayments.

 

The purpose of an Environmental Upgrade Agreement is to encourage building owners to upgrade a building to be cost efficient, reduce environmental impacts and sustainable by providing access to competitive funds provided over a longer term.

 

The details of the retrofit activity and the total funds advanced are established by the finance provider and property owner and specified in an Environmental Upgrade Agreement.

 

Environmental upgrade charges would be applied upon the land. If building ownership changes hands a new owner agrees to be bound by the Environmental Upgrade Agreement and becomes liable to pay the environmental upgrade charges, unless the current owner repays the total amount outstanding. This is a required contractual obligation in any Environmental Upgrade Agreement.

 

The following Councils in NSW currently provide Building Upgrade Finance:-

 

·    North Sydney Council;

·    City of Sydney;

·    City of Parramatta;

·    Blacktown City Council;

·    City of Newcastle;

·    Lake Macquarie City Council; and

·    Kyogal Council.

 

North Sydney Council have agreed to share their Building Upgrade Finance framework, existing contractual terms and marketing collateral if Council establishes a Building Upgrade program. North Sydney also utilise Civica Authority, Council’s main corporate computer system and have successfully integrated the rates repayment process into a platform that may be adopted.

Eligible buildings and works

 

To be eligible the building must be an existing, non-residential building located in the LGA.

 

Eligible works are those that improve the energy, water or environmental efficiency or sustainability of a building. Typically projects funded fall into three categories:-

 

1.   Generation of renewable energy and emissions reduction (e.g. solar PV);

 

2.   Improvement of energy and/or water efficiency (e.g. efficient plant and equipment lighting, air conditioning, boilers and lifts; rainwater tanks, water efficient fixtures and fittings etc.); and

 

3.   Minimisation of waste (e.g. waste infrastructure systems).

 

Discussion

 

Benefits to Council

 

Building Upgrade Finance is a way for Council to provide access to funding that can increase  sustainability, reduce CO2 and support local economic development by assisting building owners and businesses to invest in improving their non-residential buildings, reduce operating costs and attract tenants.

 

Likely benefits of Building Upgrade Finance to Council and the LGA include:-

 

·    Build resilience, deliver environmental improvements and meet 2036 emissions and water use targets;

 

·    Attract business investment;

 

·    Support local businesses to operate more efficiently, reduce operating costs and improve business competitiveness;

 

·    Assist with the transition to a low carbon economy; and

 

·    Support employment.

 

 

Benefits to Building Owners

 

Securing finance via a local council charge (the Environmental Upgrade Charge) can provide finance providers with greater security. This added security means finance providers would be able to offer more attractive finance features that are better suited to environmental upgrades, when compared to traditional commercial finance as shown in the table below.

 

Building Upgrade Finance

Traditional commercial finance

 

10-20 year term

2-3 year term

Fixed interest rate

Variable interest rate

Transferable on sale

Non-transferable on sale

Recover costs from tenants through

outgoings provisions in existing leases

Recovery through lease negotiations with

tenants

No deposit required 100% financed

Deposit required

 

Aligns with Councils Plans

 

Establishing Building Upgrade Finance aligns with the following goals:-

 

·    Delivery Program 2020-22 and Operational Plan 2020-2021;

7.1       Examine industrial sites and large commercial buildings across the LGA to establish opportunities, and support solar PV installations, in a minimum of three locations in 2020/21.

7.3       Focus infrastructure planning and management on supporting sustainable ‘local living’ and resilience to climatic events including meeting Council’s Energy Emissions and Water Use Targets

22.2     Engage and educate businesses in sustainable practices such as energy and water use

 

Enabling legislation

 

In New South Wales, Building Upgrade Finance is enabled through amendments to the Local Government Act 1993 (Part 2A Environmental Upgrade Agreements) (LG Act) which allows any local council in NSW to offer Environmental Upgrade Agreements, and the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 (Part 5A – Environmental Upgrade Agreements) which enables Council to delegate to the General Manager the authority to make or amend an Environmental Upgrade Charts. The Guidelines for Environmental Upgrade Agreements 18 February 2011 support the legislation and provide details on the mandatory provisions for councils.

 

It is important to note that under the Local Government Act, Council is never liable for any failure by a person to pay an Environmental Upgrade Charge to the financier. Also, the underlying debt does not sit on Council’s balance sheet, as council is not the lender.

 

Councils Role

 

Council would be responsible for the following tasks in administering Building Upgrade Finance, including:-

 

·        Levying the Environmental Upgrade Charge;

·        Eligibility checks;

·        Contract execution;

·        Disclosure on s603 certificates; and

·        Enforcement.

 

Council would process the forms and contracts, issue the Environmental Upgrade Contract and process the quarterly payments through the rates and finance system. Authority can be updated to include functionality that creates separate line item detailing the repayment amount.

 

Minimising Risks

 

Risks are managed by the legislation, Environmental Upgrade Agreement contract and key documents, program delivery design, and internal procedures.

 

The Environmental Upgrade Agreement contract is a template contract that is part of the Environmental Upgrade Agreement legislative package, that would be used for all transactions in New South Wales. The Environmental Upgrade Agreement contract, prepared by specialist lawyers for the NSW Government in consultation with the property, finance and local government sectors, covers the legislative requirements for entering into Environmental Upgrade Agreements.

 

Key Environmental Upgrade Agreement documents, including the Application form, Enforcement procedure, Internal procedures, Internal checklist, are documents used by councils that administer the service to further embed internal systems to meet the legislative requirements.

 

Conclusion

 

Upgraded assets, including solar PV, new lighting and air conditioning and water efficient measures can help revitalise and activate commercial precincts and generate local employment. Building Upgrade Finance is a way to support community and private sector investment in environmental upgrades that help Council to achieve strategic priorities, and deliver environmental and economic outcomes for our community.

 

Council’s continued leadership in sustainable operations when expanded to include the commercial sector is vital to achieve Co2 emission and water reductions across LGA.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

1.   The report be received and noted; and

 

2.   Council implement a Building Upgrade Finance program to non-residential precincts across the LGA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Building Upgrade Finance NSW Council Guide 2020

15 Pages

 

 

 


ATTACHMENT 1

Building Upgrade Finance NSW Council Guide 2020

 

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Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2020

Meeting House Preschool – End of Lease, 47 Burns Bay Road, Lane Cove

 

 

Subject:          Meeting House Preschool – End of Lease, 47 Burns Bay Road, Lane Cove    

Record No:    SU348 - 38670/20

Division:         Human Services Division

Author(s):      Jane Gornall 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The property at 47 Burns Bay Road is currently leased by The Meeting House Incorporated (The Meeting House) as a pre-school catering for 3-5 year old year students, with the lease due to expire in December 2020. The Meeting House Incorporated is a long-time community organisation which was established in the late 1970’s to provide services to the Lane Cove North community.  Due to the pre-school’s low attendance numbers, overall financial viability, competing priorities for the site and various historical factors outlined in this report, Council has made the difficult decision to not renew the lease, with preschool operations to cease on 31 December 2020.

 

Background

 

When the Meeting House Incorporated was established in the late 1970’s to provide services to the Lane Cove North community, Council provided with two original houses in which to operate. In 2005, Council acknowledged the fact that the houses no longer could meet the needs of a service providing a pre-school from one house and general community services from the other and that the houses were beyond effective repair or renovation. The redevelopment of the buildings that housed The Meeting House became part of the Major Projects Plan.  The redevelopment which was ultimately completed in 2013, included six residential units, a forty-place long day care centre, a community space, meeting rooms and office accommodation. 

 

When Council conducted its research for the Lane Cove Social Plan 2005-2009, a lack of all types of childcare was highlighted, but in particular places for children 0-2 years.   An action in that Plan was to ‘Increase childcare places for 0-2 years by expanding or developing new centres”

 

In 2008, Council purchased what was the Police Station at 47 Burns Bay Road, Lane Cove – with part of the reason being:-

 

‘As Council is aware the redevelopment of Meeting House is planned for later this year requiring a temporary relocation of The Meeting House services including the pre-school program.   This site can now be considered as a possible temporary location and discussions with Meeting House can now begin in earnest to assess the feasibility.’

 

Council refurbished the site at 47 Burns Bay Road – to allow for a meeting room and offices in the front of the building and an 18-place preschool which complied to the then Department of Community Services regulations.  This included storage, parking, playground and internal fitout.

This is the site that was used to house all of The Meeting House while the redevelopment took place in Stokes Street. The Meeting House preschool moved onto the temporary building in late 2010.

 

Unfortunately, as the new Stokes Street building was being completed in 2013, The Meeting House declined to relocate the preschool back to the Stokes Street site. Their reasons included that they had no experience in running a long day centre and also that they preferred the preschool, rather than the long day care model.  Council offered the services of a not-for-profit child care consultancy to address this and provided examples of where centres operated as both long day care and preschools within the same facility. Ultimately, The Meeting House indicated they would prefer to remain at the temporary site at 47 Burns Bay Road.

 

As Council was planning for the refurbishment of Kindy Cove in 2014 and required use of the site to accommodate its nursery children, The Meeting House Preschool closed and did not operate throughout 2014. The Meeting House requested the opportunity to reopen at the site in 2015 and despite reservations, as the service would not be located to serve the Lane Cove North community, the core focus of The Meeting House, Council ultimately granted a 5 years lease, which will expire in December 2020.

 

A review was undertaken of the site and other competing needs, including the option of providing a permanent home for the Lane Cove Mens Shed, with the pending redevelopment/expansion of St Columbas Residential Aged Care, where it is currently located. Council determined as part of the 2020/21 Budget, to include funding to undertake works to create a Mens Shed at the site, which will require The Meeting House to cease its operations at the site.

 

Discussion

 

The Meeting House Inc has written to Council expressing their concern and asking for the issue of the lease to be revisited.

 

Since 2008 there has been an enormous change in the number and variety of child care opportunities available within Lane Cove.  There is a report included in this Council meeting Agenda highlighting the changes in Family Day care as family’s needs have changed. Also, the Federal Government moved to increase the educational component within the programming of Long Day Care Centres, which means there is now little difference to a Preschool Program, and many private centres operate as both.

 

Council has in the last ten years built two new centres at Stokes Street (40 place) and also at Waterview Drive (60 place) to increase in particular the number of 0-2 places available – but the private sector has also increased the number of places for all ages that are now available.  Most of the Child Care Centres and Preschools in the Lane Cove LGA currently have vacancies and it could be argued that at this time there is an oversupply.

 

Anecdotally The Meeting House Preschool has struggled to fill the Centre (18 places) for most of the time that it has been at 47 Burns Bay Road – with occupancy at times averaging 10-12 children.  The Directors report which is attached to The Meeting House Annual Report 2019 – notes that numbers were low right from the start of Term 1 – with some increase leading up to Term 3.  The anticipated enrolment figures for Term 4 for 2019 were Monday – 8 children; Tuesday 11 children; Wednesday, Thursday and Friday 15 Children.  The Directors report also says that due to the low numbers they have decided to take 2.5-year olds who are toilet trained – as the staff ratio is based on the child with the lowest age – this drops their capacity to 16 a day on those days that a younger child attends.

 

The Meeting House annual report cites a loss for the Incorporated Association of $17,902 for 2019 and $9,681 for 2018– the figures are not separated between the child care centre and other activities, however with low enrolments the provision of child care is not sustainable and requires cross subsidisation.  Additional funding from the Department of Education and Communities of $70,000 for the preschool do not appear in the current financials.

 

Council does support The Meeting House Inc. financially, as well as providing subsidised accommodation at both 47 Burns Bay Road and also at 23a Stokes Street, Lane Cove North.  For the 2020/21 financial year, Council has provided an amount of $35,000 in financial assistance funding to assist in the overall provision of services by The Meeting House.  The financial assistance funding from Council has been at a similar amount for a number of years and Council has been a long-term funder of the organisation.  It is not intended to change this funding as a result of the lease at 47 Burns Bay Road finishing.

Council has also continued to support a range of not-for-profit child care centres in Council buildings – including Birrahlee Childcare (preschool – licenced for 81); Osborne Park Kindergarten Union (preschool – licenced for 60) Greenwich Kindergarten Union (preschool – licensed for 30); The Meeting House Preschool – licenced for 18) Lane Cove Occasional Care (licenced for 37); Possums Corner Long Day Care (licenced for 64).

 

All of the not-for-profit Centres listed above receive at least an 80% rent subsidy from Council to ensure a range of affordable child care is available in Lane Cove. 

In terms of the closure, there is never a ‘right time’ to close a centre. Council proposes to not renew the lease which expires at the end of 2020 when children have completed the current year. Opportunities are available for children for 2021 in other centres. Even if Council extended the lease for the preschool on a temporary basis, closure is considered inevitable considering the amount of competition both from not-for-profit and private providers in the area, ultimately making it financially unviable.

 

The site is ideally located for a Mens Shed and given the competing demands is considered the most appropriate future use of the site. Council we will be liaising with the Men’s Shed to fully understand their needs for space, ducting and machine weights to ensure appropriate floor loadings and other needs are met.  Some initial meetings were held at the start of the year, but the COVID-19 shutdown has delayed further discussions.  Staff have also visited the Mosman Men’s Shed to understand how other sheds operate. Since the announcement of the intended use a number of groups have expressed interest in being co-located with the Mens Shed. Once the full-scope of how much space the new shed will take up, opportunities for including other complimentary community uses will be explored.

 

Conclusion

 

The Meeting House in 2013 was provided with the opportunity to operate a new facility within the Lane Cove North community where the service began. Ultimately it decided to remain at 47 Burns Bay Road, knowing that it would need to close for the Kindy Cove Child care refurbishment  temporarily, and then reopen at the Burns Bay Rd site under a 5 year lease, despite Council’s reservations. Due to the pre-school’s low attendance numbers, overall financial viability, competing priorities for the site and various historical factors outlined, Council has made the difficult decision to not renew the lease, with preschool operations to cease on 31 December 2020.

 

The end of The Meeting House lease for their preschool at 47 Burns Bay Road, will allow for the facility to be utilised as a Men’s Shed with some other complimentary community uses.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council advise The Meeting House that it will not be changing its decision in respect of a new lease for 47 Burns Bay Road.

 

 

 

Jane Gornall

Executive Manager - Human Services

Human Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2020

Closure of the Willoughby/Lane Cove Family Day Care Scheme

 

 

Subject:          Closure of the Willoughby/Lane Cove Family Day Care Scheme     

Record No:    SU2525 - 38908/20

Division:         Human Services Division

Author(s):      Susan Heyne 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report discusses the closure of the Willoughby/Lane Cove Family Day Care Scheme (the Scheme) and the impact of this decision for Family Day Care services in Lane Cove.

 

Family Day Care is a home-based early childhood education and care service for children aged from six weeks to 12 years.  Educators work with small groups of no more than four children under school age and must work with an approved service that carries out regular visits to monitor the children’s development and provide support. 

 

Approved services (also called schemes or coordination units) receive funding from the Australian Government to support the educators and are regulated against the National Quality Framework.  The regulatory body responsible for monitoring, assessment and enforcing compliance in NSW is the Department of Education.

 

The Willoughby/Lane Cove Family Day Care Scheme was operated by Willoughby Council and was the approved service to support educators in the Lane Cove and Willoughby Council areas.

 

On 30 June 2020, the Willoughby/Lane Cove Family Day Care Scheme ceased operations.  At the time of the Scheme’s closure, five educators (formerly known as carers) were based in the Lane Cove Council area.

 

The decision to close the service was based on decreasing numbers of educators and increased competition both from within the Family Day Care sector as well as other childcare services.

Educators operating under the Scheme were provided with information regarding alternate Family Day Care approved services and given support to transfer to a new service.

 

Of the five Lane Cove based educators, three transferred to The Infants’ Home Family Day Care Sydney Wide service and two transferred to North Sydney Council’s Family Day Care Service.

 

Background

 

The Willoughby/Lane Cove Family Day Care Scheme has been in operation since 1991. The Scheme came about after Lane Cove Council resolved to withdraw from directly providing Family Day Care due to low levels of utilisation. A working party at the time decided that it was unlikely that the Scheme would ever be viable. 

The Willoughby/Lane Cove Family Day Care Scheme was based on an agreement between Lane Cove Council and Willoughby City Council to extend the boundaries of the area covered by Willoughby City Council’s Family Day Care Scheme to expand to include the Municipality of Lane Cove.   

The Scheme operated under Willoughby City Council’s existing Family Day Care licence and Lane Cove Council contributed financially to the Scheme. 

In 2019 Willoughby City Council commenced a review of the Scheme to ascertain the best model of delivering Family Day Care services in the current child care environment. At the time of the review the Scheme provided support to fifteen educators, five of whom lived in the Lane Cove Council area.  

The outcome of the review was that in March 2020 Willoughby City Council agreed to divest operation of the Scheme by 30 June 2020.

The outcome of this decision meant that educators currently registered with the Scheme needed to transfer to a new service. To support the transition to a new service, Willoughby City Council sought out an approved service that had the capacity to take on all educators currently registered with the Scheme as well as ensure that essential Family Day Care services continued to meet existing user expectations.

The result was the creation of a memorandum of understanding with The Infants’ Home Family Day Care Sydney Wide (The Infants’ Home).  Lane Cove Council, although informed that the review was taking place, was not involved in the review or any discussions with The Infants’ Home and is not a party to the MOU.

In March 2020, the Scheme’s educators were notified of closure of the Scheme and advised of the arrangement with The Infants’ Home.  Educators were also given the details of other approved services if they chose not to go with The Infants’ Home. Two Lane Cove educators joined North Sydney Council’s Family Day Care Scheme and three transferred to The Infants’ Home.  The new arrangement came in to effect from 1 July 2020.

 

Discussion

 

The number of Family Day Care educators in Lane Cove has remained at five for the past 30 years.  The low number of educators was the reason that Lane Cove Council decided to merge with Willoughby back in 1991.  Family Day Care services used to be licenced to operate within specific geographic boundaries and educators would register with the service licenced to operate in their local area.  This situation changed in 2008. Approved services can operate in any area and educators can register with any approved service they choose. Families also have the option of choosing other child care services outside of Family Day Care.  Lane Cove Council’s Children’s Services Directory lists a growing number of childcare providers.

With the closure of the Willoughby/Lane Cove Family Day Care Scheme the number of Council operated Family Day Care services on the North Shore has been reduced to three – North Sydney, Northern Beaches and Ku-ring-gai.  Council run services are being replaced by non-profit organisations and private operators. Mosman Council no longer runs Family Day Care services and, before the amalgamation, Pittwater Council divested its Family Day Care operations.  Both Mosman and Pittwater Council nominated The Infants’ Home as the accredited provider to transition educators from their services. 

The Infants’ Home had the capacity to take on all 19 educators that were currently with the Willoughby/Lane Cove Scheme.  They were also willing to sign a MOU agreeing ensure similar levels of support and service that educators and service users were currently receiving.  The Infants’ Home also had experience taking on educators from Council services.  As well as working with Mosman and Pittwater Councils when they closed, the Infants’ Home also worked with Randwick Council and other Councils in south east Sydney. 

Although educators can register with any service, there are benefits for educators to register with a service that has a physical base in their local area.  It means that they don’t have to travel far for face-to-face support and training as well as structured learning activities for the children. 

For Lane Cove educators the closest Council-based service is North Sydney.  At the time the Willoughby/Lane Cove Family Day Care Scheme was closing North Sydney only had capacity to take on three new educators.  The North Sydney scheme took on the first three educators who applied - two from the Lane Cove Council area and one from the Willoughby Council area.

The Infants’ Home currently has no physical base on the lower north shore.  However, the MOU between Willoughby City Council and The Infants’ Home states that Council will provide ongoing support to the Infants’ Home in the form of in-kind venue use.  There is also the potential for Lane Cove Council to provide venue space for activities and events that support the Lane Cove educators. 

 

Conclusion

 

The role of local councils in the provision of Family Day Care services across the city is changing as new services come in to the area and child care options for families expand.

The result of the closure of the Willoughby/Lane Cove Family Day Care Scheme means the role of Lane Cove Council in the provision of Family Day Care services has changed.  Educators are now registered with two different providers and, because they can choose who they register with, this may change over time. 

Council can still continue to support Family Day Care educators in Lane Cove through promotion of their service on Council’s website and by offering in-kind support to registered services to allow them to support the educators. 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Gornall

Executive Manager - Human Services

Human Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2020

Waste, Recyclables and Garden Organics Collection & Recycling Processing Tender - Tender Number 768520

 

 

Subject:          Waste, Recyclables and Garden Organics Collection & Recycling Processing Tender - Tender Number 768520    

Record No:    SU7865 - 37614/20

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):      David Wilson 

 

 

 

Executive Summary

Council on behalf of Lane Cove and Hunters Hill Councils issued a Request for Tenders (768520) to procure Councils’ waste collection services via TenderLink on 13 May 2020 which closed on 17 June 2020.

The purpose of a combined Tender between the two Council’s is to provide best value to both organisations in procuring waste and recycling collection and recycling processing services. Whilst the Request for Tender (RFT) requires consistent pricing for both Council’s, each council would enter into a separate contract with each service provider.

The RFT, subject to this Tender Evaluation is for services including; Waste, Recyclables and Garden Organics Collection Services, Recyclables Processing Service, and Garden Organics Processing Services.

Two (2) Tenders were received and evaluated for Pricing and Non-pricing criteria. The following 2 Tenders were received:-

·    URM Environmental Services Pty Ltd; and

·    SUEZ Recycling & Recovery Pty Ltd

Based on the Tenders received and in order to get the best financial and operational outcome for both Councils, the Tender Evaluation Panel recommends that Council decline and not accept any of the Tenders submitted in response to the RFT, and enter into negotiation with any contractor who can deliver the components of the service.

 

Background

 

Through a NSROC facilitated process, discussions were held with all the member Council’s in late 2019 about interest in participating in a regional waste and recycling collection contract to take advantage of cost sharing opportunities that a larger scale contract could deliver, in terms of economies and scale. Following these discussions only Lane Cove and Hunters Hill Councils were interested in pursuing a joint tender at this time.

 

The waste collection and recycling contracts for both Lane Cove Council (LCC) and Hunters Hill Council (HHC) expire in October 2020 and November 2020 respectively.  Following several contract extensions brought about by the NSROC Regional Waste Disposal Contract, the NSW Government’s Local Government Amalgamation process and more recently the China SWORD situation, a new and updated contract with a service provider (s) is necessary to meet the current and future needs of each community.

 

This joint tender seeks to provide both councils with the opportunity to share costs associated with a joint tender process and to allow for a larger scale offering to be presented to the marketplace, in terms of an increased number of services and tonnages to be collected and processed, than would be presented separately.

Notwithstanding the joint tender process, the Tender Evaluation Panel will evaluate and report individually to each Council. In turn each Council will consider and determine each aspect of the Tender in the best interest of its community.

 

Discussion

 

A tender specification was prepared detailing the schedule of work, hours of work, safety requirements and reporting requirements.  The tender submissions have been assessed on the following weighted criteria:

 

Fig.1- Non-Weighted and Weighted Criteria

Non-Weighted Criteria

Outcome

Conformity of Proposal

Pass/Fail

Insurance

Pass/Fail

Financial Capacity

Pass/Fail

Work Health and Safety

Pass/Fail

Quality Standards

Pass/Fail

Industrial Relations

Pass/Fail

 

 

 

Weighted Criteria

Weighting

Tender Pricing – Commercial Offer

40%

Confidence in the Tenderer

10%

Service Methodology and KPIs

20%

Front Line Resources

20%

Support Resources

10%

 


To achieve the maximum score the tenderer is to provide details of an environmental policy and answer yes to all applicable questions in the Environmental Survey included in the tender specification and to provide details in their submission that they have an OHS Management Plan and work method statements. 

Each Council advertised the joint Tender on their Website’s and on TenderLink on 13 May 2020. Tenders closed at 4.00pm on 17 June 2020, and Council received two submissions.  Which were assessed and evaluated by the following panel members, comprising relevant staff from each Council, an independent observer and an expert consultant. The Tender Evaluation Panel (TEP) consisted of;

Arvind Lal – (waste contract expert/consultant - non-scoring member)

David Wilson (TEP Chair) - Lane Cove Council (scoring member)

Millie Saddleton - Lane Cove Council (scoring member)

Barry Husking - Hunters Hill Council (scoring member)

Susan Leahy –Head of Internal Audit – Ku-ring-gai Council (Probity Officer, non-scoring member)

The TEP’s Report is Confidential and has been circulated separately to all Councillors.


 

Conclusion

 

Based on the limited field of tenderers and pricing submitted which exceeds Council’s 2020/21 Budget, it may be beneficial to split the contract into separate parts to be delivered by a range of providers to benefit Council. To achieve this, it is recommended in the first instance Council reject all Tenders and enter into negotiations with any provider in respect of the waste and recycling collection services and/or recycling services.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:-

 

1    In accordance with clause 178(1)(b) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 (LG Regulation), decline to accept any of the Tenders submitted in response to the Request for Tenders for waste and recycling collection and recycling processing services;

 

2    In accordance with 178(3)(e) of the Local Government (General) Regulations 2005, resolve to enter into negotiations with any person (whether or not the person was a tenderer) with a view to entering into a contract in relation to the subject matter of the tender;

 

3    In accordance with Regulation 178(4)(a) of the Local Government (General) Regulations 2005, Council’s reason for declining to invite fresh tenders or applications is that negotiation in the first instance is the most reasonable prospect of establishing an agreement with satisfactory terms and conditions that will benefit Council;

 

4    In accordance with Regulation 178(4)(b) of the Local Government (General) Regulations 2005, Council’s reasons for determining to enter negotiations with any person, is that the components within Council’s requirements may be split into separate parts to be delivered by a range of providers to benefit Council; and

 

5    Council delegate to the General Manager authority to negotiate on behalf of Council and submit a further report to Council on the outcome of the negotiations.

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Probity Officers Report - Tender No.768520

6 Pages

Available Electronically

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2020

Council Snapshot June 2020

 

 

Subject:          Council Snapshot June 2020

Record No:    SU220 - 39481/20

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):      Craig Wrightson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Attached for the information of Councillors is a review of Council’s recent activities. This report provides a summary of the operations of each division for June 2020.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Snapshot June 2020

32 Pages

 

 

 


ATTACHMENT 1

Snapshot June 2020

 

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[1] https://www.olg.nsw.gov.au/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Council-Report-Incidents-3rd-quarter-2019-20.pdf