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Agenda

Ordinary Council Meeting

16 March 2020

The meeting commences at 6.30pm. If members of the public are

not interested in any business recommended to be considered in

Closed Session or there is no such business, Council will ordinarily

  commence consideration of all other business at 7pm.

 

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Notice of Meeting

 

Dear Councillors

 

Notice is given of the Ordinary Council Meeting, to be held in the Council Chambers on Monday 16 March 2020 commencing at 7.00 PM. The business to be transacted at the meeting is included in this business paper.

 

Craig - GMYours faithfully

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

 

Council Meeting Procedures

 

The Council meeting is chaired by the Mayor, Councillor Pam Palmer. Councillors are entitled to one vote on a matter. If votes are equal, the Chairperson has a second or casting vote. When a majority of Councillors vote in favour of a Motion it becomes a decision of the Council. Minutes of Council and Committee meetings are published on Council’s website www.lanecove.nsw.gov.au by 5pm on the Thursday following the meeting.

 

The Meeting is conducted in accordance with Council's Code of Meeting Practice. The order of business is listed in the Agenda on the next page. That order will be followed unless Council resolves to modify the order at the meeting. This may occur for example where the members of the public in attendance are interested in specific items on the agenda.

 

Members of the public may address the Council Meeting on any issue for a maximum of 3 minutes during the public forum which is held at the beginning of the meeting. To speak at a public forum you must register your details with Council by 5:00pm on the day of the Council meeting at which you will be speaking.  All persons addressing the Meeting must speak to the Chair. Speakers and Councillors will not enter into general debate or ask questions.

 

If you do not understand any part of the information given above; require assistance to participate in the meeting due to a disability; or wish to obtain information in relation to Council, please contact Council’s Executive Manager – Corporate Services on (02) 9911 3550.

 

Please note meetings held in the Council Chambers are recorded on tape for the purposes of verifying the accuracy of minutes and the tapes are not disclosed to any third party under the Government Information (Public Access)  Act 2009, except as allowed under section 18(1) or section 19(1) of the PPIP Act, or where Council is compelled to do so by court order, warrant or subpoena or by any other legislation.

 

 

 


Ordinary Council 16 March 2020

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

APOLOGIES

 

OPENING OF MEETING WITH PRAYER

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT TO COUNTRY

 

NOTICE OF WEBCASTING OF MEETING

 

public forum

 

Members of the public may address the Council Meeting on any issue for 3 minutes.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

 

1.      ORDINARY COUNCIL MEETING - 17 FEBRUARY 2020

 

Mayoral Minutes

 

2.       Mayoral Minute - National Redress Scheme

 

Orders Of The Day

 

Notices of Motion

 

3.       Notice of Motion - Kingsford Smith Oval - Dog Leash Free Use

 

4.       Notice of Motion - Sydney Buses Privatisation / Franchise

 

Officer Reports for Determination

 

5.       Planning Proposal 31 for 524-542 Pacific Highway, St Leonards (the “Telstra site”)

 

6.       Sport and Recreation Precinct - Concept Plan

 

7.       Open Space in Sutherland Street - Consultation Outcome

 

8.       New Year's Eve Celebrations - Manns Pt, Greenwich Pennisula

 

9.       Lane Cove's Energy Emissions and Water Use Targets

 

10.     Greenwich Village Games 2020

 

11.     Council Snapshot February 2020  

 

 

 

 

           


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 March 2020

Mayoral Minute - National Redress Scheme

 

 

Subject:          Mayoral Minute - National Redress Scheme    

Record No:    SU181 - 13539/20

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):      Councillor Pam Palmer 

 

 

Background

 

The National Redress Scheme has been established by the Federal Government in response to recommendations of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

 

The Scheme acknowledges that many children were sexually abused in Australian institutions, recognises the suffering endured because of this abuse, and holds institutions accountable for this abuse.

 

The Royal Commission reported that around one third (32 per cent) of survivors nationally who attended private sessions, indicated that they were abused in government managed institutions. Of these, 1.2 per cent reported abuse in a local government institution.

 

The Scheme will run for 10 years and provides eligible people with access to three elements:-

 

·    A redress payment (ranging from less than $10,000 to a maximum of $150,000)

·    Counselling, and

·    A direct personal response from the responsible institution/s.

 

If the survivor requests a Direct Personal Response, the Mayor, on behalf of the council, may be asked to participate in a face-to-face meeting or write a letter of apology as part of the redress process. If a face-to-face meeting is requested councils will be required to pay for costs associated with the DPR.

 

The Scheme’s Independent Decision Makers assess and decide redress claims, not the NSW Government or other participating institutions, such as local governments.

 

Further information about the Scheme is available at www.nationalredress.gov.au.

 

Discussion

 

An institution is considered responsible for child sexual abuse if it was responsible for the person who abused the child (the abuser) having contact with the child.

 

Under the scheme independent decision makers will determine responsibility considering factors such as whether:-

 

·    The institution was responsible for the day-to-day care or custody of the person;

·    The institution was the legal guardian of the person;

·    The institution was responsible for placing the person in the institution;

·    The abuser was an official of the institution; and

·    The abuse occurred on the institution’s premises or in connection with its activities.

 

Responsibility will be determined on a case by case basis. An institution may not be found responsible even if one or more of these factors exist, depending on the circumstances. For example, if the only connection to the institution is that the abuse occurred on the premises, the institution that owns the premises is unlikely to be found responsible.

 

People can choose to apply under the program if they:-

 

·    Experienced institutional child sexual abuse before 1 July 2018;

·    Are aged over 18 or will turn 18 before 30 June 2028;

·    Are an Australian citizen or permanent resident;

·    Are applying about an institution that has joined the National Redress Scheme, and

·    Apply between 1 July 2018 and 30 June 2027.

 

Last week, Council staff and I attended the Redress Forum for Local Government, hosted by Local Government NSW. The Attorney General, The Hon. Mark Raymond Speakman, SC MP outlined the scheme and indicated that already two cases involving councils had been determined as being eligible, one in the metro area and one in a regional area.

 

The scheme is an important step forward in addressing what has occurred in the past and highlighting the importance of implementing processes to improve prevention going forward. Council staff will be reviewing Council’s Working with Children Checks process and related policies with a view to improving them and aligning them to the new requirements.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor Pam Palmer

Mayor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

         


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 March 2020

Notice of Motion - Kingsford Smith Oval - Dog Leash Free Use

 

 

Subject:          Notice of Motion - Kingsford Smith Oval - Dog Leash Free Use     

Record No:    SU1230 - 13966/20

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):      Councillor David Brooks-Horn; Councillor Scott Bennison 

 

 

After discussions with representative from dog owners in the local area and sporting groups that use the Kingsford Smith Oval on a regular basis the following has been agreed to principal in response to addressing Council’s concerns over recent events that has concerns by Council over safety of its staff and residents who use the oval.

This motion is designed to provide transparency over the responsibilities of the people how use Kingsford Smith Oval and Lane Cove Council.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

 

1.         Undertake a trial to manage the Dog Leash Free Use of Kingsford Smith Oval as follows:-

 

a.   Chicanes be installed with gates;

b.   On Monday to Friday the gates are to be locked open between 6.30am and 3.30pm and be closed the remaining times;

c.   On Saturday and Sunday the gates be closed;

d.   Notwithstanding the above, when the oval is booked for a sporting match, dogs continue to be prohibited on the oval;

e.   The Kingsford Dog Owners Association members shall be responsible for opening the chicane gates Monday to Friday, Council staff shall be responsible for closing them;

f.    When the cricket nets are booked (i.e. not the full field), dogs shall be restricted to the northern third of the field. Signs will be prominently placed to create an imaginary line to designate the area which shall be available for leash free use by dogs. Dogs will not be permitted on the remaining two thirds of the field when the cricket nets are in use;

g.   Large signs shall be placed in prominent positions outlining the above rules including fines for dogs chasing and other offences pursuant to the Companion Animals Regulations 2008;

h.   Should the General Manager determine that in the interest of staff and/or public safety that the current arrangements are not working, then the General Manager prepare a report to Council for further consideration.

 

2.         A report be submitted to Council after 1 month, and in December 2020 with the following information (including comparison data where available) to determine the success/non-success of the above strategies:-

 

a.   the reliability of the opening and closing of the gates;

b.    the number of reported instances where as a result of the unlocked gates on the chicanes there is injury to residents and/or their dogs;

c.   the number of confrontations between Council staff and dog owners,

d.   disruptions to hirers of the oval relating to dog use; and

e.   other information that the General Manager deems necessary to allows Council consideration of risk to staff and residents.

 

3.   Prior to commencement of the trial, video equipment be installed with appropriate signage to allow review of reported incidents (no real time monitoring). A 4 system Camera System is available for circa $2000 (See attachment 1), which could be funded by an adjustment to Council’s Budget at the next Budget Review.

4.   During the initial 1-month trial period, Council investigate options for automation of the opening and closing of the gates and the information including costings be submitted with the report to Council. A possible solution could include two gates at each entrance one being automated (to be opened) and the other remain a manual self-closing gate.

5.   The General Manager work with the Kingsford Dog Owners Association to develop a Code of Practice for use of the Oval as a Dog Leash Free Area and identify options for promotion of it and means of ensuring compliance.

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor David Brooks-Horn

Councillor

 

 

 

Councillor Scott Bennison

Councillor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Camera Options for Kingsford Smith Oval Dog Leash Free Use

5 Pages

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 March 2020

Notice of Motion - Sydney Buses Privatisation / Franchise

 

 

Subject:          Notice of Motion - Sydney Buses Privatisation / Franchise    

Record No:    SU2483 - 13967/20

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):      Councillor Andrew Zbik 

 

 

 

In late October 2019, the NSW Government announced its plans to privatise Sydney’s remaining public bus services.

 

The regions 7, 8 and 9 cover the Northern Beaches, Eastern Suburbs and Ryde/Willoughby areas and are responsible for more than half of all bus trips made in the state. The Lane Cove Local Government Area (LGA) is located within Region 7 which is currently operated by Sydney Buses.

 

The announcement means Sydney bus commuter’s local bus services are at risk.

Recent bus privatisation in Sydney’s inner-west and Newcastle hasn’t worked. On-time running is down, routes have been cut, stops have closed, and workers’ conditions have plummeted.

 

In Region 6, on-time running has plummeted since the service was privatised. Since taking over, the private company has failed to meet its on-time running KPIs almost every month.

 

Cuts to local bus services aren’t just an inconvenience – they’re a serious risk. In Newcastle we’ve seen children left by the side of the road; the less-able in the community forced to change buses multiple times to get to appointments, or stop using public transport altogether.

 

In February 2020 changes the local F8 ferry service were proposed by Transdev, the private operator of Sydney Ferries. Council made a submission opposing these changes based on feedback from residents that services would be diminished (Item 15/Feb 2020 Council minutes).

 

The recent storms in Lane Cove during February resulted in large parts of the Lane Cove LGA going without electricity for up to a week. On Monday 9th March during NSW Parliament Budget Estimates hearings is was revealed that Ausgrid is currently operating at its lowest staffing level in years, shedding almost 3,000 jobs under the current Government. The electricity operator’s workforce is 3228 - well below the legally required 3570 employees. What’s more, leaked documents revealed last week showed that Ausgrid has plans to cut another 500 jobs next year, bringing their total workforce down to almost 2,700. The reduced number of electricians that are employed by Ausgrid was cited as one of the major factors contributing to the delay in restoring electricity services to local residents.

 

It is clear that the privatisation or the franchise of public owned entities has resulted in reduced quality of service delivery. 

 

Therefore, in my opinion, it would be appropriate for Council to oppose any privatisation or franchise of local bus services provided by Sydney Buses.

 

SOURCES:

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/performance-of-sydney-s-inner-west-buses-worse-in-private-hands-20190507-p51ks5.html

 

https://www.busnews.com.au/industry-news/1906/transit-systems-addresses-sydney-region-6-bus-criticism

 

https://www.energymagazine.com.au/job-cuts-blamed-for-ausgrid-power-outages/

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

 

1.   Write to the NSW Premier – The Hon. Gladys Berejiklian and Member for Lane Cove - The Hon. Anthony Roberts to express opposition to the proposed privatisation or franchise of local Sydney Buses services in the Lane Cove LGA; and

 

2.   Seek assurances that bus services enjoyed by the people of Lane Cove not be cut or removed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor Andrew Zbik

Councillor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

   


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 March 2020

Planning Proposal 31 for 524-542 Pacific Highway, St Leonards (the “Telstra site”)

 

 

Subject:          Planning Proposal 31 for 524-542 Pacific Highway, St Leonards (the “Telstra site”)    

Record No:    SU5784 - 61654/19

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):      Terry Tredrea; Christopher Pelcz 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

A planning proposal was reactivated with Council on 7 December 2018 and again in July 2019, and November 2019, in relation to the land. This is a reactivation of a modified planning proposal originally lodged on 7 December 2016, and subsequently deferred by the applicant to await the release of the Department of Planning’s Draft St Leonards/Crows Nest 2036 Plan (the “2036 Plan”). The purpose of this Proposal is to rezone the site from B3 (commercial only) to B4 (residential/commercial) in order to permit a single 53-storey canter-levered tower development which would extend over the existing Telstra Exchange building (and which would remain intact and be operational pre and post construction).

 

The Proposal was referred to the Lane Cove Local Planning Panel (LCLPP) for advice on the 3 March 2020. In accordance with Section 9.1 of the EP & A Act, staff prepared an assessment report with recommendations in relation to the Planning Proposal including whether or not the proposal should be forwarded to the Minister for a Gateway Determination. The Panel was requested to review and consider relevant issues and amendments proposed by the proponent along with the views and concerns raised in the staff report (AT-1).

 

The LCLPP advises that Planning Proposal 31 is not supported and should not proceed to the Gateway Determination.

 

Having regard to the advice of the Lane Cove Local Planning Panel (AT-2), it is recommended that Planning Proposal 31 be rejected and not be forwarded to the Minister for a Gateway Determination.

 

Background

 

The Site:

 

The site is located along the Pacific Highway in the St Leonards CBD, the site is known as 524 – 542 Pacific Highway and incorporates the existing ‘Telstra Exchange’ building (as shown below).

 

Figure 1: Street View of current site

 


 

Current Planning Controls

 

The current planning controls for the site are as follows:

 

· 

 

Legal Description

Zoning

B3 Commercial Core

Site compromised of:

·  Lots 7, 8 & 9 in DP 3175;

·  Lots A, B, C & D in DP 377423; and

·  Lot 1 in DP 433297.

Site Area

1,671 sqm (proposal)

Current FSR

17.1:1

Possible GFA

28,575 sqm

Height Limit

72 m

 

If developed entirely for Commercial purposes, a potential building could be 22 – 24 storeys in height.

Proposal

 

Planning Proposal 31 requests that the Lane Cove Local Environmental Plan be amended to:-

 

·    Rezone the site from B3 Commercial Core to B4 Mixed Use;

·    Increase the building height controls for the site from 72m to 182m (a 250% height increase); and

·    Increase the FSR controls from 17.1:1 to 21.3:1 (a 24% increase in total floor space).

 

Overall, the proposed controls could potentially result in the following outcomes:

 

 

CURRENT CONTROLS

PROPOSAL 

Zoning

B3 Commercial Core

B4 Mixed Use

FSR

17.1:1

(commercial)

17.2:1

(Residential)

4.1:1 (Non-residential)

21.3:1 (Total)

Gross Floor Area

28,575 sqm

(commercial)

28,592 sqm (Residential)

6,914 sqm (Non-residential)

35,506 sqm (Total)

Height

72 metres

182 metres (53 storeys) RL 264

Apartments

zero

330

Parking Spaces

315 (based on Council’s parking controls)

160 (need car stacker because of Telstra exchange building)

 

The Planning Proposal would result in:

 

·    A 53 storey, cantilevered, tower (as shown below) sitting above and beside the Telstra exchange building. The Exchange would remain operative and the proposal “not impact on the functionality of the building”, with active retail facades screening the Exchange to Pacific Highway;

·    39 levels of residential, typical floor plate of nine apartments, with a GFA of 634 m2 per floor. Indicative dwelling mix:-

30% 1 bedroom;

65% 2 bedrooms; and

5% 3 bedrooms.

·    Seven levels of parking in the podium, accessed by car stacker;

·    Two retail tenancies along the Pacific Highway, providing activation and safety for the surrounding public domain. (Upper Ground);

·    Along Nicholson Lane, potential for pocket retail uses. (Lower Ground);

·    An 11m-high residential and commercial lobby would wrap around the corner of the Pacific Highway and Christie Street;

·    Two levels of Gym and one of Childcare. A communal roof lounge at level 50;

·    Vehicular access is via a driveway on Christie Street, which provides access to a loading dock shared between Telstra and the residential building;

·    Height = RL 263.35 metres, which is 36m taller than the adjacent New Hope and 88 Christie St sites. Note: this RL is based on subtracting the 13m height reduction proposed in December 2019 from the RL proposed prior to this;

·    Internal solar access is discussed in the applicant’s previous studies;

·    Based on applicant’s shadow analysis, it appears to cast fairly continuous shadow over 69 Christie St (southern commercial neighbour), while causing additional overshadowing of public open space at Newlands Park; and

·    Views from the north to the site have not been addressed.

 

A voluntary planning agreement was also proposed, but was not assessed as part of the Planning Proposal – in accordance with Council’s policy.

 

Discussion

 

Referral to Local Planning Panel

 

On 3 March 2020, Planning Proposal 31 for the Telstra site was referred for advice to the Lane Cove Local Planning Panel, under Clause 9.1 of the EP&A Act 1979. The Panel was requested to review and consider issues and amendments proposed by the proponent along with the views and concerns raised in the staff report (AT-1).

 

The Report to the Lane Cove Planning Panel examines the detailed provisions of the proponent’s Planning Proposal against the strategic and site-specific merit test. Discussion is contained within this report (see AT-1).

 

In general terms, the matters for consideration are addressed under the following strategic documents:-

 

·    Strategic Merit test:-

 

A Metropolis of Three Cities;

North District Plan;

Draft St Leonards/Crows Nest 2036 Plan;

Council’s Draft Local Strategic Planning Statement; and

Council's "pilot project" approach to St Leonards.

 

·    Site-specific merit test:-

 

Overshadowing in the 2036 Plan;

Viability to provide A-Grade commercial floor plate; and

Parking provision.

 

At the meeting, Council staff provided an overview of Planning Proposal 31. Proponents of Planning Proposal 31 addressed the Panel.

Following this, the Panel deliberated on the Proposal and provided their considered advice in the form of recommendations and reasons for their decision, see AT-2. The LPP concurs with staff’s recommendations, and advises that Planning Proposal 31 is not supported and should not proceed to the Gateway Determination.

 

Advice to Council

 

In providing their advice to Council (AT-2), the Panel unanimously supported the findings in the staff report and provided the following additional commentary:-

 

“The Panel considers that the proposal is premature given that the St Leonards and Crows Nest Draft Plan (which identifies the site and adjoining land as a significant site) has not yet been finalised by NSW Planning Industry and Environment.

 

The Panel is of the view that there is a need to retain the subject land for employment uses due to its strategic location. Permitting residential development on this site would represent a lost opportunity for the future provision of high quality commercial floor space in this strategic location. The planning proposal appears to be short-sighted and market driven.

 

It is relevant to note that the Lane Cove LGA has exceeded its residential targets for 2020 and will continue to do so based on approvals issued and future developments which are in the pipeline. It is therefore considered that there is no demand for additional residential land within the LGA in the foreseeable future.

 

It is considered that the emerging built form in this locality respects and enhances open space, view corridors and connectivity. The proposal does not respond appropriately to this emerging form.

 

There is no apparent justification for the significant height increase over the existing and approved buildings in the immediate locality. It is also noted that the building height proposed would encroach on the Obstacle Limitation Surface Level for Sydney Airport.

 

The proposal provides no justification as to why the Telstra building must remain on site in its current form. This is a significant constraint which appears to be driving the outcome. Any proposal should consider alternatives to retaining the Telstra building in its current form.

 

The proposal does not properly consider the adjoining sites in a strategic context. In the absence of amalgamation, the constraints presented by this site prohibit a development of the size and scale proposed. Indeed, developing the land in isolation would hinder the ability to provide a master-planned outcome for the precinct.

 

The Panel is of the view that the planning proposal is fundamentally flawed and lacks strategic merit”.

 

This confirms the staff view that such a proposal is inconsistent with the Regional plan for Sydney, the North District Plan, the Draft St Leonards/Crows Nest “2036 Plan”, and Council’s “Pilot Projects” in St Leonards. The proposal also fails the site-specific merit test in terms of overshadowing, building height, economic constraints, setbacks and parking. These concerns are addressed in full in the attached report to the Local Planning Panel (AT-1).

 


 

Conclusion

 

In conclusion, the proponent’s planning proposal is not consistent with the Dept of Planning, Infrastructure & Environment’s Strategic and Site-specific merit tests, as well as additional economic, social, and traffic considerations raised by the Proposal, and as such is not be supported and should not proceed to the Gateway for Determination.

 

Having regard to the above, it is recommended that Planning Proposal 31 not be supported and should not proceed to the Gateway for Determination.

 

Note: Staff also note that the proponent has on 30 January appealed Council’s anticipated determination, and requested a rezoning review of their Telstra site Proposal by the Dept of Planning, Infrastructure & Environment (DPI&E).

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

Having regard to the advice from the Lane Cove Local Planning Panel, at its 3 March 2020 meeting, it is recommended that the “Telstra site” Planning Proposal No. 31 not be supported and not proceed to Gateway Determination, as it:

 

A.  Fails the strategic merit test

 

Reasons

 

1.   Is not consistent with A Metropolis of Three Cities which identifies the St Leonards Strategic Centre as a major employment asset of the Eastern Economic Corridor for “attracting investment, business activity and jobs in strategic centres across Greater Sydney increasing access to a wide range of jobs, goods and services close to people’s homes and supporting the 30-minute city.” (p 119).

 

2.   Is not consistent with the North District Plan's priorities or actions for the St Leonards Commercial area, which identifies “the importance of the precinct as a key employment centre in Greater Sydney”. Particularly as a health and education (employment) "super precinct". This Proposal realises approximately 24% of the employment potential of the site as it currently exists, thereby constraining the centre’s ability to provide for the long-term projected employment growth as envisaged by the Plan.

 

3.   Counter to the "Significant Site" concept of the Draft 2036 Plan, the Draft Plan’s Economic Feasibility Report recommends retaining most or all of the existing B3 zoned sites, and allowing additional floorspace including mixed use with minimum commercial floorspace only in the B4 zone.

 

4.   Is not consistent with the following aspects of the Draft St Leonards/Crows Nest 2036 Plan:-

 

a)   The proposition by the proponent that St Leonards/Crows Nest cannot compete with North Ryde / Macquarie Park and Chatswood, and therefore commercial land use here represents a negative return on investment, is refuted by the 2036 Plan’s Economic Feasibility Report, which concludes "the new Metro station and Metro rail investment is expected to catalyse higher value office development in the medium-short term." (p75). That is, taking a longer-term, strategic perspective.

 

The Proposal does not acknowledge or take into account recent development and leasing activity (i.e. approval of the JQZ 16-storey, A-grade commercial building, and the Mastercard tenancy);

 

b)   It is inconsistent with the "Significant Site" concept of the Draft 2036 Plan, which:

 

i. Requires amalgamation with the AMA building (p.62. Opposed by applicant); and

ii. allows mixed-use development on key sites to "encourage more A-grade commercial office floorspace. The proposal only intends to develop 24% of the current employment potential GFA, and therefore represents a significant underutilisation of the potential 28,000 m2 of commercial space.

 

c)   Given the likely impacts on the adjoining AMA building, the proposal does not “avoid unreasonably constraining development potential of neighbouring sites” – another Significant Site Design Criteria in the Draft 2036 Plan (page 62); 

 

d)   It requires a rigorous design excellence process, (and is currently inconsistent with the height concept of the Draft 2036 Plan); and

 

e)   It is inconsistent with the Draft 2036 Plan's Principle to "ensure no additional overshadowing of public open spaces..." (p11) as it would create additional overshadowing of Newlands Park from 10:15am to 10:45am. Note, as a result of height reduction in the December 2019 iteration, the proposal appears not to overshadow houses to the south of River Road.

 

5.   It is not consistent with the following aspects of Council’s exhibited and amended Draft Local Strategic Planning Statement:-

 

a)   Principles for the Location of Additional Housing (page 30) are focused on the St Leonards Strategic Centre and its surrounds in existing B3 Commercial Core zoned land, but not at the expense of the attraction and growth of jobs; and

 

b)   Council’s action “To grow jobs in the St Leonards Commercial Office Precinct and Strategic Centre, all existing Commercial Core zoned land will be retained. This approach will be reviewed after the delivery of the Crows Nest Metro Station (in 2024)” (page 44).

 

6.   It is not consistent with Council's "pilot project" approach to St Leonards centre, which was not intended to become a precedent for others that are not part of the specified policy, but rather is a finely balanced policy designed to revitalise and stimulate the centre's long-term employment potential by activating sites adjacent to open space. Council’s pilot projects encourage commercial land uses above that currently required. It is too soon to consider further B4 rezoning.

 

7.   Due to the number and degree of non-compliances with the Draft 2036 Plan objectives, design criteria, design principles and actions, the proposal has not appropriately responded to any change in circumstances.

 

 

B.  Fails the site-specific merit test

 

Reasons

 

8.   The applicant’s claim that due to site constraints, the size of the commercial floor plates would be limited and unsuited to “A-grade” stock is counter to the Draft 2036 Plan’s main reason for allowing B4 Mixed use – “mixed use development on key sites to encourage more A-grade commercial office floorspace and encourage revitalisation of St Leonards” (p 54). Even with the applicant’s amendments, the A-grade commercial floor space proposed is still a 24% underutilisation of the current potential.

 

9.   The proposed car stacker, servicing a 7-10-storey above-ground car park, for an estimated 65 peak hour vehicle movements per hour, is likely to compromise the amenity of business and residential tenants, and has the potential to adversely impact the traffic at the intersection of Christie St and Pacific highway, which is an important gateway to the precinct.

 

10. Due to the number and degree of non-compliances with the Draft 2036 Plan objectives, design criteria, design principles and actions, the proposed vehicular egress (via Pacific Highway) is not justified. If the site was amalgamated with 69 Christie Street (as per the Draft 2036 Plan) this would potentially be alleviated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Report to Local Planning Panel - Telstra Site

35 Pages

 

AT‑2View

Advice from Local Planning Panel - Telstra Site

5 Pages

 

AT‑3View

Planning Proposal - 24 September 2019

93 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑4View

Concept Design Update - 16 December 2019

15 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑5View

Previous Concept Design Report 0 14 November 2019

16 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑6View

Amending LEP Maps

1 Page

Available Electronically

AT‑7View

Letter of Revised Scheme - 18 December 2019

6 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑8View

Economic Impact Assessment - 22 November 2019

78 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑9View

Contamination Report

76 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑10View

Transport Impact Assessment - 30 November 2019

47 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑11View

Letter from GTA - 9 September 2019

1 Page

Available Electronically

AT‑12View

Further Letter from GTA - 5 November 2019

5 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑13View

Response to Lane Cove comments on 2036 Plan - 26 March 2019

16 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑14View

VPA Letter of Offer - 10 September 2019

3 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑15View

Transport NSW Letter - 13 August 2019

1 Page

Available Electronically

AT‑16View

Extract of Draft 2036 Plan

8 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑17View

Extract of Draft 2036 Plan: Urban Design Report

4 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑18View

Extract from Strategic Market Assessment Report

22 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑19View

Extract of Draft 2036 Plan: Economic Feasibility Report

3 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑20View

Extract of Draft 2036 Plan: Strategic Transport Study

2 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑21View

Extract of Draft 2036 Plan: NSW Government Architect Advice

2 Pages

Available Electronically

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 March 2020

Sport and Recreation Precinct - Concept Plan

 

 

Subject:          Sport and Recreation Precinct - Concept Plan    

Record No:    SU7156 - 13069/20

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):      David Stevens 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council since 2010 has been working on developing the existing Lane Cove Golf Course as a Recreation Precinct. Concept Plans have now been developed which will accommodate: a nine (9) hole golf course; driving range; putt-putt golf; 5 indoor multi-sport courts; 4 outdoor multi-courts/ tennis courts; gym; golf professional shop; stage; reception; restaurant with extensive terrace; and a 300-space underground car park. It is recommended Council undertake community consultation on the plan to determine what design changes are required and whether or not to proceed with the Sport and Recreation Precinct.

 

Background

 

In May 2010 Council considered a report on the future of the then Lane Cove Country Club following an operational review which had been conducted by an external consultant. The report concluded that the current operating model of separate management of the components;- golf clubhouse, golf course, tennis centre and golf course maintenance was unsustainable. Council subsequently resolved in part, that:-

 

“Council proceed with undertaking a strategic review of the Country Club facility, other nearby community facilities, and the golf course to identify opportunities to provide a more viable sporting/cultural type development than what currently exists.”

 

In 2013 Montemare Consulting completed an initial feasibility report which examined opportunities for introducing new sports and facilities into the Golf Course Precinct whilst maintaining a Golf Course. It examined gaps in overall recreation facility provision and highlighted the lack of indoor facilities and facilities which catered for Women’s sports. A copy of the summary presentation is included as AT-1 and the full report is available at AT-2.

 

Council in 2015 received a further report from Montemare Consulting analysing options for the scale of the building and associated costs. Council then placed further development of the concept on hold pending the outcome of the development at 266 Longueville Road which was identified as the primary revenue source for the project.

 

Discussion

 

In 2018 Council staff reactivated the project and developed an Expressions of Interest (EOI) document to determine market interest in the original concept. The EOI was the first stage of two in a procurement process designed to help inform Council of what the “market” sought in terms of sporting and recreation and ancillary facilities, plus confirming (or otherwise) Council’s vision of the Sport and Recreation Precinct.

 

Prior to calling for Expressions of Interest staff met with Council’s Recreation Precinct Liaison Committee to discuss the document, in particular the facilities to be located within the precinct. Ultimately the following were included:-

 


 

Indoor Facilities (Mandatory):

·      Multi-sport indoor courts

·      Extensive, flexible spectator seating

·      Change rooms and amenities

·      Indoor sports reception / program desk and retail / merchandising area

·      Bar / restaurant / function space servicing indoor / outdoor spaces

·      Golf pro shop

·      Golf change rooms and amenities

·      Board / Meeting room

·      Golf memorabilia display area

·      Golf maintenance facilities

·      First Aid and emergency services

·      Car parking to meet the facilities demands

 

Indoor Facilities (Optional)

·      Stage for use as performance venue

·      Tennis pro-shop, change room and amenities

·      Cafe / coffee shop servicing indoor / outdoor spaces

·      Crèche

·      Children’s play facilities

·      Health and wellness

·      Skate Park

·      Climbing wall

 

Outdoor Facilities (Mandatory)

·   9-hole golf course (redesign concepts are permitted that cater for retention of existing footprint and par at a minimum, in order to maintain affiliation with Golf NSW)

·   Practice putting green

·   Practice nets

          

Outdoor Facilities (Optional)

·    Floodlit multi-sport synthetic tennis courts

·    Practice chipping green

·    Golf driving range (may be located on the course with appropriate course redesign)

·    Children’s playground

·    Skate Park

·    Climbing wall

 

The EOI was released in August of 2018 with responses received from three (3) principal operators, and a further five (5) from “single sporting discipline experts”. After formally meeting with the three principal operators it was determined that a more prescriptive concept was required that includes greater clarity around the component parts and their mix in the proposed Recreation Precinct. From this process it was concluded that the proposed Sport and Recreation Precinct should accommodate: a nine (9) hole golf course; driving range; putt-putt golf; 5 indoor multi-sport courts; 4 outdoor multi-courts/ tennis courts; gym; golf professional shop; stage to accommodate a temporary performance space; reception; restaurant with extensive terrace; and a 300-space underground car park. The tennis courts were deemed necessary to accommodate the demand for floodlit tennis courts in the LGA, which the current facility meets.

 

Studies and analysis show that the introduction of a golf driving range would result in 53,000 visits per annum. In terms of annual rounds of golf, Lane Cove Golf Course currently hosts 16,650 (including competition golf in the blocked tee times for Members) versus an average of 23,650 per annum in the years 2008 to 2012. As part of a broader sport and recreation precinct offering, golf rounds are forecast to more than double on a per annum basis. Breaking down the component parts of the proposed mix further, the 4 outdoor multi-sports / tennis courts may expect 91,000 and the 5 indoor multi-sports courts 137,000 visits per year.

 

In June 2019 Council engaged a Lead Design Consultant AJ+C to develop a concept which was refined via collaboration with the three respondents in addition to environmental, traffic and geotechnical studies to better understand site constraints. Included as AT-3 is the concept plan for the new facility.

 

In parallel, work began on the necessary changes required to the golf course layout to accommodate a golf driving range. Council engaged Greg Norman Golf Course Design to develop a conceptual masterplan to redesign the existing nine (9) hole course whilst providing for a driving range, putt-putt golf and short game practice area. Options considered included a 9-hole par 3 course, 6 hole mixed par course (new concept) and a 9 hole mixed par course culminating in the design of a 9 hole par 29, 1300m layout. Golf NSW (who was a respondent to the EOI, propose the inclusion of a NSW High Performance Golfing Centre of Excellence including state of the art coaching and fitness) have reviewed the proposed redesign and confirmed that the par and length mean that Lane Cove Golf Club can continue to be affiliated with the State Body and continue to run interclub and / or state-based competitions plus stage Golf NSW participation programs and events. Included as AT-4 is the concept plan for the new golf course layout.

 

Council is now in the position of having a concept plan for the Recreation Precinct to undertake community consultation.

 

Community Consultation

 

Statement of Intent

 

The consultation is designed to obtain community feedback on the on the Sport and Recreation Concept Design for scale; sporting discipline mix; capacity and use; general amenity and purpose. Any comments received will be reviewed and evaluated to determine what design changes are required and whether or not to proceed with the Sport and Recreation Precinct.

 

Method

 

Level of Participation

Inform

Inform

Consult

Form of Participation

Open

Targeted

Open

Target Audience

Lane Cove Community and community groups

Adjoining Owners

Golf Club Members, State Golf Body, Local Sporting Groups and adjoining Local Government Areas

Lane Cove Community, Golf Club and community groups

Proposed Medium

Advertisement,

eNewsletter and Social Media

 

 

Notification Letters

 

Public Exhibition, Drop-in on site for two weekend days),

Website Exhibition and Survey

 

Indicative Timing

6 weeks

6 weeks

6 weeks

Conclusion

 

Council has progressed the concept design for the Recreation Precinct to a point where it can seek input to the project from the community. The design has incorporated a large variety of sporting options, food and beverage offerings, a stage for temporary performance and a large temporary parking area. This diversity will ensure a sustainable precinct with significant increases in usage of the precinct.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.   Council note and receive the report;

 

2.   Council undertake consultation as outlined in the report; and

 

3.   A further report be submitted to Council outlining the results of the consultation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Montemare Summary Presentation 2013

37 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑2View

Recreation Precinct - Montemare - Indoor Sports Centre Feasibility Study Final Report

115 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑3View

Concept Plan for the New Facility.

8 Pages

 

AT‑4View

Lane Cove Concept Master Plan

1 Page

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 March 2020

Open Space in Sutherland Street - Consultation Outcome

 

 

Subject:          Open Space in Sutherland Street - Consultation Outcome    

Record No:    SU1326 - 12097/20

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Sashika Perera 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The permanent closure of Sutherland Street at Coxs Lane is one of several traffic management changes in the Lane Cove Village resolved at an Ordinary Council meeting in May 2017 to prepare for the opening of The Canopy development. The closure is facilitated by the means of a cul-de-sac and creation of an open space area on Sutherland Street.

 

In February 2020, Council undertook community consultation on two design options for the open space on Sutherland Street. Council distributed 68 letters to residents of Sutherland Street and had a 68% response rate to the survey. The majority of residents (52%) preferred Option 1, the larger park option. It is recommended Council proceed with Option 1, the larger park option.

 

Background

 

One of the integral Lane Cove Village traffic management changes is the installation of traffic signals at the Sutherland Street/Coxs Lane/Burns Bay Road intersection.

 

As a result of the upcoming installation of the new traffic signals, Council is required to make additional changes in surrounding streets to adhere to Transport for NSW guidelines. These guidelines do not permit a T-intersection, such as the current T-intersection at Coxs Lane and Sutherland Street, to be in close proximity to traffic signals.

 

As such the permanent closure of Sutherland Street is required to improve safety. Vehicular access to Sutherland Street will be maintained via Graham Street and pedestrian access from Sutherland Street to Coxs Lane will remain.

 

The above traffic management changes were discussed in the November 2018 Traffic Committee meeting. As per the recommendation of this meeting, Council prepared a Traffic Management Plan for Sutherland Street outlining the impact of the closure and modelling results which concluded that the redistribution of traffic will have minimal impact on Graham Street. The permanent closure of Sutherland Street was subsequently approved by TfNSW in January 2020.

 

Discussion

 

Following community consultation in 2017, Council resolved to permanently close off Sutherland Street at Coxs Lane by means of a cul-de-sac and creation of an open space area. Council also received a petition from residents of Sutherland Street regarding the location of the cul-de-sac.

 

In February 2020, Council further consulted residents of Sutherland Street on two design options for the cul-de-sac. Both options are identical except for the size of the open space provided where Option 1 provides a larger open space area in comparison to Option 2.

 

The advantages and disadvantages for each option are outlined below. The concept design for each option is included in AT-1 and AT-2.


 

Option 1 (Larger open space)

 

·    Offers 675 m² of open space;

·    6m radius on cul-de-sac;

·    Provision of a 1.2 m wide footpath to provide connectivity to Coxs Lane; and

·    Driveway access to 65 Burns Bay Road maintained.

 

Advantages

Disadvantage

Provides an additional 260 m² of open space

Removal of two trees

Provision of open space of sufficient size that will be accessible to local residents for recreation

 

Enhances environmental quality of neighbourhood

 

Potential for play equipment to be installed

 

 

Option 2 (Smaller open space)

 

·      Option 2 was developed to address residents’ concern regarding waste collection vehicles turning outside of their property. Subsequently, Council developed a design where the cul-de-sac was shifted further east to ensure that vehicles do not turnaround directly outside of these properties;

·      Option 2 offers 415 m² of open space;

·      6m radius on cul-de-sac;

·      Provision of a 1.2 m wide footpath to provide connectivity to Coxs Lane; and

·      Driveway access to 65 Burns Bay Road maintained.

 


Advantages

Disadvantage

Addresses residents’ concerns regarding waste collection vehicles turning around directly outside their properties

Removal of two trees

 

Reduced open space in comparison to Option 1

 

Reduced amenity for open space users

 

Loss of larger street trees

 

Community Consultation Outcome

 

Community consultation was undertaken in February 2020 where Council distributed 68 letters to residents of Sutherland Street and received 46 responses (68% response rate). Results of the consultation are as follows:

 


Support for Option 1

Support for Option 2

Support for Either Option

52%

41%

7%

 

The majority of residents preferred Option 1, the larger park option.


 

Conclusion

 

A larger open space area offers many community benefits including enhanced environmental quality and a large enough area for potential play equipment or additional trees to be installed.

 

Given that Option 1 also received majority support (52%), it is proposed Council proceed with Option 1, the larger park option.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.   The report be received and noted; and

 

2.   Council approve Option 1, the larger park option for implementation.

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Terescenko

Executive Manager - Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Concept - Option 1 - Sutherland Street

1 Page

 

AT‑2View

Concept - Option 2 - Sutherland Street

1 Page

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 March 2020

New Year's Eve Celebrations - Manns Pt, Greenwich Pennisula

 

 

Subject:          New Year's Eve Celebrations - Manns Pt, Greenwich Pennisula    

Record No:    SU3530 - 14007/20

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Martin Terescenko 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report recommends Council explore alternatives to the closure of Greenwich Road on New Year’s Eve for celebrations at Manns Pt Reserve, with a view to maintaining safety while improving access for residents and their guests.

 

Discussion

 

Each year on New Year’s Eve, approximately 200 people gather at Manns Pt Reserve, Greenwich, to view the fireworks at Sydney Harbour Bridge.  The area is a designated alcohol-free zone and generally the atmosphere and scale of attendance can be considered low key.

 

To date NSW Police have insisted on the closure of the area to vehicular traffic. Police close Greenwich Road at Bay Street and Chisholm Street at Edwin Street, from 5:30pm on 31 December to 2am on the 1 January. The closures primarily impact those residents who still require access to their properties during the road closure hours, as the following access rules apply:-

·    5:30pm-6pm – Residents and their visitors will be allowed to enter the road closures (with appropriate proof of address);

·    6pm onwards – no access will be allowed into the road closures for anyone, including residents, with the exception of emergency services;

·    Vehicles will be permitted to exit the road closure 9:00 pm onwards after a safety assessment of all pedestrian and vehicle movements and other potential hazards has been conducted by onsite NSW Police officers. This assessment may result in longer wait periods; and

·    Vehicles will be allowed to enter the road closures after 2am.

 

It is noted that the distance from the barricades to Manns Pt is over 1km. For many years local residents and their guests were allowed to pass through the road block, however, in recent years NSW Police have standardised their approach to closures on New Year’s Eve and exemptions are no longer made.

 

NSW Police have consistently advised that the road closure is designed to ensure appropriate pedestrian safety. The removal of vehicles minimises potential conflicts between pedestrians and vehicles, typically where there are large crowds of people which spill onto the road once actual footpaths have reached capacity. While this is typical of the Sydney CBD and North Sydney, the scale of the Manns Pt event does not necessitate this.

 

Council receives feedback from the residents of the Greenwich Peninsula that the restrictions are onerous both in terms of wanting to leave the area and come home on News Year Eve and when they wish to have guests over on New Year’s Eve. Council has previously made representations on the issue to NSW Police seeking a relaxation of the arrangements, however this has typically been after preparations are well underway for the upcoming New Year’s Eve. Given the planning for this year’s event is in its infancy, it is suggested Council again raise the issue.

 

Options include introducing a ticket system for pedestrians to access Manns Point Reserve, this is consistent with North’s Sydney Council’s high traffic areas. Tickets are sold to recover the costs of hosting the event. Currently Council’s expenditure is as follows, with no cost recovery:-

 

Variable Message Boards/ Advertising/Public Notices                      $5,000

Portable Toilets                                                                                   $2,000

Waste Management                                                                           $500

Updating of street signage (replace missing signs)                           $500

Overtime – cleaning on 1 of January                                                 $1,000

Total Costs                                                                                        $9,000

 

In kind costs of approximately 40-50 hours are incurred for pre/post management, preparation of the traffic management plan and submission to the Traffic Committee for endorsement, liaising with Police, booking of equipment, arranging Ranger services that are rostered on NYE to assist the Police in the closure of Greenwich Road and the erection of barricades etc.

 

A ticketed event would in addition incur costs associated with security, fencing and ticket administration (online) costs.

 

Alternatively, Council could issue permits to residents and their guests (capped if necessary) upon application in advance of the event to allow residents to leave the area and come home on News Year Eve when they wish or to have guests over.

 

Conclusion

 

New Year’s celebrations across Sydney have continually evolved to ensure the celebrations are safe and family friendly. The current arrangements for Manns Pt Reserve are the same as those being implemented for areas with much higher attendance levels which are onerous for local residents wanting to leave the area and come home on New Year’s Eve and when they wish to have guests over on New Year’s Eve. Given the planning for this year’s event is in its infancy, it is suggested Council again raise the issue with NSW Police to explore options to address the situation whilst maintaining safety.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:-

1.     Council receive and note the report; and

2.     Council work with NSW Police to explore other alternatives to the current arrangements which maintain safety for celebrations on New Year’s Eve at Manns Pt Reserve on the Greenwich Peninsula.

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Terescenko

Executive Manager - Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 March 2020

Lane Cove's Energy Emissions and Water Use Targets

 

 

Subject:          Lane Cove's Energy Emissions and Water Use Targets    

Record No:    SU7238 - 13093/20

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):      Fiona McCleary 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 16 September 2019 declared a Climate Emergency and requested a report be prepared that outlines carbon and water use baseline research findings and recommendations for the future management of energy and water consumption in Council owned buildings, and throughout the LGA.

 

Council engaged Sustainability Consultants, Kinesis, to examine historical data since 2003 and extrapolate trends, assuming Council and the community were to adopt sustainable policies and practices to conserve energy and water, and other sustainable practices such as reducing waste, reusing and recycling. They have considered likely major events and actions that may assist Council to actively reduce Council emissions over time and assessed the challenges and opportunities in identifying emissions and water use targets. They also identified major challenges and opportunities for Council as a leader in the community to raise awareness, educate and promote action to address the impacts of climate change.

 

There are limitations to the report given the high-level review. Policies and recommended actions will need to be considered in light of the local context, both physical and administrative, as part of any policy review. Otherwise Council’s recommendations may be less effective and have unintended consequences.

 

The opportunity analysis supports Council and the community setting the following targets:-

 

·         80% reduction in emissions by 2036 (FY16/17 emissions baseline); and

 

·         No net increase in water use by 2036 (FY16/17 water use baseline).

 

Kinesis believe these targets are achievable and in line with what other councils are proposing across NSW.

 

This report outlines strategies and actions required to achieve these targets (AT-1).

 

Background

 

Understanding current and historical trends of energy and water use is integral to developing a long-term understanding of climate change and an action plan that is outcome focused, cost effective and embraced by Council and the community.

 

The Kinesis analysis of both Council and community energy use, transport patterns, waste generation, greenhouse gas emissions and water use, found the following:-

 

·         Lane Cove’s LGA emissions equaled 279,000 tonnes of Co2-e in 2016/17;

·         Lane Cove’s LGA water use equaled 3.5 gigalitres of water in 2016/17;

·         Council operations contribute to ~2% of emissions and water in the LGA;

·         Electricity is the largest source of emissions for Council operations at 85%;

·         To date, the LED streetlighting replacement program has decreased Council’s Co2 emissions by 28% since FY15/16;

·         Community emissions are evenly split between the residential and non-residential sectors;

·         Across the residential and non-residential sector, electricity is the largest source of emissions, followed by transport;

·         Like-for-like, the peninsula suburbs of Northwood and Longueville have higher emissions and   water use than other suburbs;

·         Solar PV on private homes has grown to 15%. By comparison Sydney’s outer western suburbs average 20% of all households;

·         New dwellings are generally not installing solar PV, which presents an opportunity to encourage higher BASIX targets;

·         The residential sector consumes 80% of the water in the LGA;

·         Irrigation, toilets and laundry use as much water as drinking grade water, highlighting the opportunity for recycled water and water reuse; and

·         Council’s overall electricity consumption has decreased over time despite new facilities coming online to support the increased population.

 

 

These research findings have shaped the emissions and water reduction recommendations and targets, along with the specific strategies to reach them.

 

Discussion

 

Kinesis has modelled future-State wide scenarios that gauge the potential for Lane Cove to achieve lower emissions and water use. Between 2030 and 2035 the electricity grid is expected to become cleaner through the closure of up to five coal power stations, and their substitution with renewables or alternative base load options. Given that electricity is the LGA’s largest source of emissions, a cleaner grid is expected to have a significant beneficial impact on emissions reductions. However, the transition in the grid will be a slow process and the cost of inaction would result in the release of a significant amount of avoidable emissions.

 

Based on this analysis, there are eight (8) strategic directions to consider for the short and mid-term that would assist Lane Cove to move towards a low emissions and low water use future. These strategic directions will be included in a new supplement within Council’s Sustainability Action Plan and the next Community Strategic Plan which is due post the 2020 Local Government elections. Specific actions have also been identified in each area which will be incorporated into Council’s 2020/21 Delivery Plan for action over the next 12 months.

 

1.         Targeted renewable energy.

 

Engage with large asset owners and key stakeholders to achieve significant uptake of renewable energy and emissions reduction impact, e.g. data centre owner operators, hospitals, industrial sites and large commercial buildings.

 

Explore community and industry collaborations through two methods:-

·    A rates-based financing system to facilitate the uptake of solar PV in the community; and

·    Council facilitated delivery of precinct scale infrastructure solutions including renewable energy and recycled water by establishing performance targets and engage with infrastructure providers and developers.

 

Action: Examine industrial sites and large commercial buildings across the LGA to establish opportunities, and support solar PV installations, in a minimum of three locations.

 

Action: Implement a pilot project engaging large apartments to undertake an energy and water assessment to identify energy saving opportunities, along with an action plan.

 

2.         Identify high-performance new building standards that are relevant for Lane Cove. 

 

Collaborate with DPIE to set locally specific performance standards for new residential and non-residential developments (e.g. higher BASIX targets and NABERS pre-commitments).

 

Track and monitor performance of new developments against net zero buildings outcomes and increase sustainability benchmarks further over time.

 

Action: Prepare a paper on possible higher BASIX targets, including those already endorsed in other LGA’s and report back on the outcomes and opportunities.

 

Action: Lobby the NSW Government to encourage mandatory higher BASIX targets for residential and commercial new buildings. 

 

Action: Introduce a program for residents to engage sustainability consultants and implement sustainability outcomes at the pre-DA stage.

 

3.         Continue to deliver efficient Council owned, and leased, assets.

 

Continue leadership in sustainability by ensuring all existing and new Council assets are energy and water efficient.

 

Council has achieved a 28% emissions reduction since FY15. A further 35% reduction in emissions on current levels can be delivered through completing the streetlighting replacement program, transitioning Councils fleet to Electric Vehicles and continuing to install solar PV as a standard on all buildings.

 

The predicted changes to the electricity grid would deliver a further 50% emissions reduction in the future.

 

Action: Install a minimum of 100kW solar PV at the Aquatic Centre across the Grandstand and the main building.

 

Action: Continue to work with Ausgrid to complete the LED Streetlighting Program by December 2020.

 

4.         Investigate establishing a Low Carbon Precinct in the LGA.

 

The Greater Sydney Region Plan encourages Council to identify Low Carbon Precincts (as per Objective 33). Council could identify a precinct that can become an exemplary model for the LGA by categorising it as a Low Carbon Precinct.

 

To achieve this Council will need to work with developers, the community and the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE) to establish performance standards and requirements through appropriate controls including Six Star building ratings, parking and transport strategies for a Low Carbon precinct.

 

Action: Incorporate standards into appropriate planning controls (including Local Strategic Planning Statements, Local Environment Plan, Development Control Plan).

 

Action: Review DCP controls and investigate increasing the NABERS rating of mixed-use developments to six stars and apartment ratings to a minimum of 5 stars.

 

5.         Water conservation strategies.

 

Kinesis’ technical analysis suggests that the biggest drivers of water reduction are new building standards and retrofit programs that target the residential sector. Ambitious water reduction opportunities have the potential to achieve an 11% reduction in potable water consumption across the LGA.

 

Work with recycled water providers to facilitate greywater recycling for all new developments and large public open space areas.

 

Local planning controls could mandate the installation of a third pipe for recycled water in major projects such as the Low Carbon Precinct.

 

Establish a water conservation awareness program to encourage the refurbishment of existing buildings with new water efficient fixtures.

 

Action: Undertake a study to Identify opportunities for recycled water use in Council owned and leased facilities.

 

Action: Promote opportunities available to residents and business to improve water conservation and recycling in partnership with Sydney Water.

 

Action: Install water saving technology in the new 50m Pool.

 

6.         Waste innovation.

 

Examine and create awareness programs with best practice strategies to reduce disposable and recyclable waste at the outset i.e.: greater use of bio-degradable packaging, community and commercial scale food composting, and take a shared economy approach to reduce consumption and reuse goods.

 

Set and stage landfill diversion targets for business and retailers with incentives for successful participants exceeding targets.

 

Investigate the benefits and accordingly facilitate a joint waste contract for the non-residential sector to reduce emissions from waste trucks.

 

As a pilot project, work with surrounding Councils and industry to sign a single waste contractor for a Low Carbon Precinct.

 

Action: Implement the shared waste contract with business at The Canopy.

 

Action: Use The Canopy shared waste contract as a pilot program and investigate additional shared waste opportunities across the commercial sector.

 

Action: Seek to identify additional recycling and waste minimisation opportunities through collaboration with shared services with Hunters Hill Council.

 

7.         Car use to public and active transport.

 

Continue working with TfNSW and private mobility service providers to develop strategic public and active transport links across the LGA with a particular focus to connect future centers, such as the Low Carbon Precinct, with residential areas.

 

Expand safe roads for bicycle riders by reducing the speed limit in non-arterial roads.

 

Action: Prepare a Sustainable Transport Action Plan (STrAP).

 

8.         Plan for new mobility.

 

Develop an integrated transport strategy that considers current trends in car ownership, accessibility-based parking rates and the uptake of electric vehicles to modify development controls.

 

Encourage parking innovation and deliver car parking that responds to emerging localised car ownership patterns and accessibility.

 

Plan shared mobility investment to substitute private vehicle ownership and as such, provide mobility choice and reduce transport related consumption-based emissions. This could include sharing Council’s fleet with the community.

 

Instead of owning a fleet, Council can also engage a car share provider to provide a fleet of efficient hybrid and electric vehicles in Council car parks that can be used by Council as well as the community.

 

Future proof new developments by using development controls to mandate the provision of Electric Vehicle charging infrastructure.

 

Action: Commence transitioning Council’s fleet to Electric Vehicles by 2025 including purchasing up to two additional electric vehicles in the next 12 months.

 

Action: Develop and include an Electric Vehicle strategy in the DCP that mandates new developments include Electric Vehicle charging infrastructure.

 

Action: Continue to install Electric Vehicle infrastructure in public places.

 

Lane Cove’s Fair Share to the Paris Agreement

 

The Paris Agreement and the associated International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) SR15 (Special Report), also known as “Global Warming of 1.5 Degree” report, gives the world a carbon budget that is equivalent to 10 years of current emissions. Under the Paris Agreement, most countries, including Australia, have agreed to limit warming to 1.5°C or "well below" 2°C above pre-industrial levels.  Meeting the Paris Agreement objective of keeping global warming to below 1.5°C requires more than achieving just emissions reduction, it requires staying within the carbon budget. The faster the rate of emission reduction, the higher the chance of preventing further global warming. For Lane Cove to play a leadership role towards limiting global warming to 1.5°C, we must reduce Council and community emissions in the short-and-mid-term.

 

Based on the IPCC SR 15 findings, to do our fair share towards limiting global warming to 1.5°C, Lane Cove’s carbon budget is equivalent to approximately 10 years of its CY 2017 emissions. That is, Lane Cove carbon budget is approximately 2.8 million tonnes Co2.

 

Even after implementing the report recommendations we are expected to overshoot our carbon budget. This shows it is imperative to start reducing emissions in the short and mid-term as the cost of inaction is high and meeting the carbon budget will require investigating identified strategies in detail and adopting an action plan, as well as utilising carbon offsets.

 

Conclusion

Following the declaration of a climate emergency in September 2019, Council has been investigating pathways to achieve Co2 emission and water reductions both across the community, and within Council’s operations. By raising awareness, developing key projects and collaborating with stakeholders in our community, State and Federal Governments, Council can foster change and grow commitment to a sustainable climate.

These recommended targets are a first step to understanding not only our contribution to climate change we are currently experiencing but demonstrate what great progress Council has made under its sustainability program over the last ten years. Council’s continued leadership in sustainable operations can, if expanded to include the community, drive a targeted approach towards increased sustainability across the LGA and the Kinesis analysis indicates that interventions at the Federal and State level could also drive significant emissions reductions. The targets are achievable by Lane Cove, given that there is a community appetite to achieve long-term sustainability. Council has show leadership by reducing our Co2 emissions and water consumption.

If Council is to be effective by taking a leadership role, Kinesis argues it must take immediate action to support emissions reductions in our community between now and 2036. The emissions mitigated in the short and medium term would have a lasting impact on our rate of energy and water consumption and our contribution to climate resilience and sustainability.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.   The report be received and noted;

 

2.   A new supplementary chapter be included in Council’s Sustainability Action Plan which outlines the 8 key directions identified; and

 

3.   The following actions be adopted and incorporated into the 2020-2021 Delivery Program and Operational Plan:-

 

·         Examine industrial sites and large commercial buildings across the LGA to establish opportunities, and support solar PV installations, in a minimum of three locations in 2020/21;

 

·         Implement a pilot project engaging large apartments to undertake an energy and water assessment to identify energy saving opportunities, along with an action plan;

 

·         Prepare a paper on possible higher BASIX targets, including those already endorsed in other LGA’s and report back on the outcomes and opportunities;

 

·         Lobby the NSW Government to encourage mandatory higher BASIX targets for residential and commercial new buildings; 

 

·         Introduce a program for residents to engage sustainability consultants and implement sustainability outcomes at the pre-DA stage;

 

·         Install a minimum of 100kW solar PV at the Aquatic Centre across the Grandstand and the main building in 2020/21;

 

·         Council to continue to work with Ausgrid to complete the LED Streetlighting Program by December 2020;

 

·         Review DCP controls and investigate increasing the NABERS rating of mixed-use developments to six stars and apartment ratings to a minimum of 5 stars;

 

·         Identify opportunities for recycled water use in Council owned and leased facilities;

 

·         Promote opportunities available to residents and business to improve water conservation and recycling in partnership with Sydney Water;

 

·         Install water saving technology in the new 50m Pool;

 

·         Implement the shared waste contract with business at The Canopy;

 

·         Use The Canopy shared waste contract as a pilot program and investigate additional shared waste opportunities across the commercial sector;

 

·         Seek to identify additional recycling and waste minimisation opportunities through collaboration with shared services with Hunters Hill Council;

 

·         Prepare a Sustainable Transport Action Plan (STAP);

 

·         Commence transitioning Council’s fleet to Electric Vehicles by 2025 including purchasing up to two additional electric vehicles in the next 12 months.;

 

·         Develop and include an Electric Vehicle strategy in the DCP that mandates new developments include Electric Vehicle charging infrastructure; and

 

·         Continue to install Electric Vehicle infrastructure in public places.

 


 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Kinesis Final Report - Energy Emissions and Water Use Targets

34 Pages

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 March 2020

Greenwich Village Games 2020

 

 

Subject:          Greenwich Village Games 2020    

Record No:    SU2741 - 12782/20

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Jessica Quilty 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The Greenwich Village Games are conducted every four (4) years by the Greenwich Village Games Organising Committee on behalf of Council.  It is recommended that the 2020 Games be conducted by the Committee, consisting of nominated community representatives and the three (3) East Ward Councillors.

 

Background

 

The Greenwich Village Games are conducted by a Council Committee, the Greenwich Village Games Organising Committee, which was constituted as an official Council Committee for the last four (4) games in 2004, 2008, 2012 and 2016 respectively.  The Games are a community run event with some 21 events held over a three (3) day weekend, which are conducted on a cost neutral basis.

 

Discussion

 

The next Greenwich Village Games are scheduled to be held from 4th December to 6th December 2020. Events will largely be centered around Bob Campbell Oval with Lane Cove Golf Course, the Aquatic Centre and River Road Tennis Centre. Council normally provides assistance to the Committee via the booking of facilities and various logistical support with the preparation and use of the Council maintained venues such as Bob Campbell Oval and with the payment of expenses incurred by the Committee on the basis of the full recovery of costs through participation fees.

 

The constitution of the Committee (AT-1) requires Council to make the appointments to the Committee. It is therefore proposed to update the membership of the Committee as new members of the community have been nominated since the last games.  Council is represented on the organising committee by the three (3) East Ward Councillors and it is proposed to appoint the following community representatives to the Committee:-

 

2020 organising committee

Chairman

Sandy Calder

Events

Mark Merrick

Secretary

Lynne Spencer

Treasurer

Brendan Morse

 


 

Other committee members

Anne-Marie Sirca

Ben Wilson

Stephen Shepherd

Natalie Speer

Michael Ryland

Jo Cooke

Marina Von Behr

Anthony Foley

Richard Hawkins

Peter Walton

Isabel Rawlence

Craig Stafford

Jon Tindall

Michael Armati

 

 

Team Captains

Karen Markell

Erin Cini

Isabel Rawlence

Penny Williams

John Saleh

Michelle Passmore

Jon Tindall

Midi Stormont

Peter Richards

Nick Tindall

John Erasmus

Bede Thompson

Ray Karslake

Ben Wilson

Dennise Terry

 

Conclusion

 

The Greenwich Village Games are a prime example of an inclusive community run event which demonstrates the uniqueness of Lane Cove and our strong sense of community and participation. The Games are reflective of the ideals of Council’s Love Where You Live approach to developing civic pride in Lane Cove and its village identity, and in particular the Love Where You Play component.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

1.   Receive and note the information;

2.   Support the 2020 Greenwich Village Games being conducted by the Greenwich Village Games Organising Committee; and

3.   Appoint the following representatives to the 2020 Organising Committee the three (3) East Ward Councillors, Sandy Calder (Chairman), Mark Merrick (Events), Lynne Spencer (Secretary), Brendan Morse (Treasurer), Anne-Marie Sirca, Natalie Speer, Marina Von Behr, Peter Walton, Jon Tindall, Ben Wilson, Michael Ryland, Anthony Foley, Isabel Rawlence, Michael Armati, Stephen Shepherd, Jo Cooke, Richard Hawkins, Craig Stafford, Karen Markell, Penny Williams, Jon Tindall, Nick Tindall, Ray Karslake, Erin Cini, John Saleh, Midi Stormont, John Erasmus, Ben Wilson, Isabel Rawlence, Michelle Passmore, Peter Richards, Bede Thompson and Dennise Terry

 

 

Jessica Quilty

Acting Executive Manager

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Greenwich Village Games Charter 2020

3 Pages

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 March 2020

Council Snapshot February 2020

 

 

Subject:          Council Snapshot February 2020    

Record No:    SU220 - 13687/20

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):      Craig Wrightson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Attached for the information of Councillors is a review of Council’s recent activities. This report provides a summary of the operations of each Division for February 2020.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Council Snapshot February 2020

39 Pages