Logo Watermark

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Agenda

Ordinary Council Meeting

17 February 2020

The meeting commences at 6.30pm. If members of the public are

not interested in any business recommended to be considered in

Closed Session or there is no such business, Council will ordinarily

  commence consideration of all other business at 7pm.

 

LC_WebBanner


 

Notice of Meeting

 

Dear Councillors

 

Notice is given of the Ordinary Council Meeting, to be held in the Council Chambers on Monday 17 February 2020 commencing at 7:00pm. The business to be transacted at the meeting is included in this business paper.

 

Craig - GMYours faithfully

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

 

Council Meeting Procedures

 

The Council meeting is chaired by the Mayor, Councillor Pam Palmer. Councillors are entitled to one vote on a matter. If votes are equal, the Chairperson has a second or casting vote. When a majority of Councillors vote in favour of a Motion it becomes a decision of the Council. Minutes of Council and Committee meetings are published on Council’s website www.lanecove.nsw.gov.au by 5pm on the Thursday following the meeting.

 

The Meeting is conducted in accordance with Council's Code of Meeting Practice. The order of business is listed in the Agenda on the next page. That order will be followed unless Council resolves to modify the order at the meeting. This may occur for example where the members of the public in attendance are interested in specific items on the agenda.

 

Members of the public may address the Council Meeting on any issue for a maximum of 3 minutes during the public forum which is held at the beginning of the meeting. To speak at a public forum you must register your details with Council by 5:00pm on the day of the Council meeting at which you will be speaking.  All persons addressing the Meeting must speak to the Chair. Speakers and Councillors will not enter into general debate or ask questions.

 

If you do not understand any part of the information given above; require assistance to participate in the meeting due to a disability; or wish to obtain information in relation to Council, please contact Council’s Executive Manager – Corporate Services on (02) 9911 3550.

 

Please note meetings held in the Council Chambers are recorded on tape for the purposes of verifying the accuracy of minutes and the tapes are not disclosed to any third party under the Government Information (Public Access)  Act 2009, except as allowed under section 18(1) or section 19(1) of the PPIP Act, or where Council is compelled to do so by court order, warrant or subpoena or by any other legislation.

 

 

 


Ordinary Council 17 February 2020

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

APOLOGIES

 

OPENING OF MEETING WITH PRAYER

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT TO COUNTRY

 

NOTICE OF WEBCASTING OF MEETING

 

MATTERS RECOMMENDED BY THE GENERAL MANAGER TO BE CONSIDERED IN CLOSED COMMITTEE

 

public forum

 

Members of the public may address the Council Meeting on any issue for 3 minutes.

 

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

 

1.      ORDINARY COUNCIL MEETING - 2 DECEMBER 2019 AND EXTRAORDINARY COUNCIL MEETING – 3 FEBRUARY 2020

 

Mayoral Minutes

 

2.       Mayoral Minute - Proposed Changes to Ferry Services

 

Orders Of The Day

 

Notices of Motion

 

3.       Notice of Motion - Waste to Energy Project

 

Officer Reports for Determination

 

4.       Lane Cove North Traffic Study

 

5.       New Park at 552 Mowbray Road Park - Results of Community Consutlation

 

6.       Amended Code of Meeting Practice

 

7.       Community Gift Card - Love Where You Shop - 12 Month Update

 

8.       Financial Assistance to Regional NSW Impacted By Drought Conditions

 

9.       Hunters Hill, Lane Cove, Parramatta, Ryde, Bushfire Risk Management Committee - Bush Fire Risk Management Plan - 5 Year Plan -  Adoption

 

10.     January 2020 Traffic Committee Meeting

 

11.     2nd Quarter Review for 2019 - 2020 Budget

 

12.     Living Labs

 

13.     The 2nd Quarter Review of the 2019 - 2020 Delivery Program and Operational Plan

 

14.     Council Snapshot January 2020  

 

 

 

 

           


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 February 2020

Mayoral Minute - Proposed Changes to Ferry Services

 

 

Subject:          Mayoral Minute - Proposed Changes to Ferry Services    

Record No:    SU438 - 8524/20

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):      Councillor Pam Palmer 

 

 

I have received representations from residents concerned about proposed changes to ferry services, particularly the F3 route via Greenwich.

 

On 5th February I met with representatives from Transdev who are conducting the public consultation on behalf of Sydney Ferries.

 

On 11th February I met with our local State MP, Hon. Anthony Roberts, to raise residents concerns.  However, Mr Roberts was already well aware of the issues.

 

On 13th February Council wrote to Transdev on behalf of residents noting the following concerns.

 

1.   Consultation process

Unfortunately, there were some apparent failures in the consultation process:-

 

·         the proposals appeared to be communicated as a ‘fait accompli’;

·         residents only became aware of the proposals well into the submission period;

·         subsequent requests to extend the consultation period were not successful; and

·         the online user interface was very difficult to negotiate and, as a result, many people were unable to lodge submissions.

 

2.   Loss of Circular Quay

I understand that the proposed new F8 route would terminate at Barangaroo, instead of Circular Quay.  In addition, it would eliminate the Balmain stop/s.  I understand that these changes result in a 5-minute reduction in travel times. 

 

The direct link to Barangaroo is potentially a positive as it could bring many city workers closer to their workplace.

 

The shortened travel time is also welcomed.

 

However, the existing connection to Circular Quay is important in many ways: for easy public transport connections, for evening access to the Opera House, for simple interchange to the airport train line for travellers, etc. 

 

The proposals therefore represent a net downgrade of service to residents and are not supported.

A suggestion is to add the Balmain East stop to the new F8 route as an “interchange” point, thus allowing ferry travellers to choose to continue to Barangaroo or change for Circular Quay.  I note this stop is indicated on the Parramatta F3 service as an “interchange” point.

 

3.   Increased frequency of ferry services

Any proposed increased frequency of ferry services would be a welcome improvement.  However, these benefits will only be realised if transport connections are likewise made more frequent.

For example, for Lane Cove residents, the only connecting public transport to Greenwich Wharf is the route 265 bus.  This bus would need to run more frequently to service any extra ferry services.

The consultation documents do not mention that this factor has been considered.

 

4.   Lane Cove River ferry service

I also raised the possibility of adding to the current review of services those ferries that run on the Lane Cove River ie. the existing Captain Cook “Rocket” service.  These services already use the Opal Card.  It may be possible to further improve services for residents by providing better connectivity of these routes into the F3 or F8 services.  Again, Balmain East could be an easy interchange point.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.         Council receive and note the report; and

 

2.         Given that submissions closed on 14th February, submit any further concerns to Transdev as a supplement to Council’s already lodged submission.

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor Pam Palmer

Mayor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

         


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 February 2020

Notice of Motion - Waste to Energy Project

 

 

Subject:          Notice of Motion - Waste to Energy Project    

Record No:    SU6280 - 8387/20

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):      Councillor Scott Bennison; Councillor David Brooks-Horn 

 

 

 

Late last year I invited the General Manager to observe a demonstration of an innovative Waste to Energy Project which utilises Hydroxy Gas, that claims to process waste with zero carbon emission. In summary the technology involves incineration of waste in a completely sealed process so there are no emissions (including no CO2). The generated heat would drive steam turbines to generate electricity. One of the continuing challenges for society has been waste disposal and the generation of ‘green power’ suitable to deliver base load power and this technology provided an opportunity to address both issues.

 

This exciting technology is being developed by EGEL Pty Limited and their vision is for:-

                                   

·    Cleaner environment, air, water and soil, by lowering emission and pollutants; and

·    Lower base energy prices for Australian consumers and local manufacturers.

 

In addition to the process of incinerating waste with zero carbon emissions, there are several by-products that would be recovered from the process and sold to produce revenue:-

 

1.       Methanol - Its principal uses are in organic synthesis, as a fuel, solvent, and antifreeze. Methanol is a polar liquid at room temperature. It is used as antifreeze, solvent, fuel, and as a denaturant for ethanol. windshield washer fluid, Paint and many more products. The chemical is also used to produce biodiesel via transesterification reaction;

2.       Graphite is mostly used for refractory, battery, steel, expanded graphite, brake linings, foundry facings, and lubricants. Graphite blocks are used in blast furnace linings where the graphite's high thermal conductivity is very critical;

3.       Carbon dioxide in solid and in liquid form is used for refrigeration and cooling. It is used as an inert gas in chemical processes, in the storage of carbon powder and in fire extinguishers. Metals Industry: Carbon dioxide is used in the manufacture of casting moulds to enhance their hardness;

4.       Hydrogen is used daily as a gas and liquid by many industries, including the petroleum industry and in manufacturing processes for producing chemicals, foods and electronics. these include metalworking (primarily in metal alloying), flat glass production (hydrogen used as an inert or protective gas), the electronics industry (used as a protective and carrier gas, in deposition processes, for cleaning, in etching, in reduction. Fertiliser can be made;

5.       Nitrous oxide is a colourless gas that is commonly used for sedation and pain relief, but is also used by people to feel intoxicated or high. It is commonly used by dentists and medical professionals to sedate patients undergoing minor medical procedures;

6.       Carbon Black is widely used as a model compound for diesel soot for diesel oxidation experiments. Carbon black is mainly used as a reinforcing filler in tires and other rubber products. In plastics, paints, and inks, carbon black is used as a colour pigment; and

7.       Oxygen used for steel manufacturing.

 

Having observed the process which captured 100% of the emissions in the system, independent laboratory testing was commissioned which demonstrated that the gases captured included CO2 (originally 17.2% of the gases by volume) was effectively eliminated after passing through the process. Refer Attachment AT-1.

 

The next step in the development of the technology is to deliver a small scale operating plant, that can demonstrate the full process. To achieve this, there are a number of hurdles to overcome, namely:-

 

·    Securing a test site that would enable the collection of data over a period of time;

·    Securing funding for a prototype project and ultimately a full-scale project;

·    Getting approval from EPA to process raw waste on the test site; and

·    Obtain details of any barriers of using existing infrastructure (polls and wire) to supply energy from such a facility.

 

I understand that the Federal Government offers funding for these types of projects and Senator Jim Molan has advised me that he would be willing to meet with representatives from Council and EGEL to assist in obtaining funding for the initial prototype.

 

I therefore propose that Council assist EGEL with representations to the Federal Government to explore the potential of the technology.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.   Council write to Senator Jim Molan seeking a meeting to explore possible Federal Government funding for a demonstration project; and

 

2.   A further report be submitted to Council on the outcome of the meeting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor Scott Bennison

Councillor

 

 

 

Councillor David Brooks-Horn

Councillor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Waste to Energy Co2 Gas Analysis

 

 

 

   


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 February 2020

Lane Cove North Traffic Study

 

 

Subject:          Lane Cove North Traffic Study    

Record No:    SU1326 - 1320/20

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Sashika Perera 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

With the increase in medium density development in the Mowbray Road precinct, the Lane Cove North area has been the subject of many community complaints regarding traffic matters. While the focal point of the complaints has been rat-running on Karilla Avenue, a holistic approach is required to address the recurring traffic, pedestrian and cyclist issues in the Lane Cove North area.

 

Bitzios consulting was commissioned to undertake the traffic study with the aim of identifying and improving various issues in the Lane cove North Precinct. This Study for the Lane Cove North Precinct was completed in January 2020 (AT-1). 

 

The study area is bounded by major roads of Mowbray Road West, Pacific Highway, Longueville Road and Epping Road (AT-2).

 

This report reviews the improvement options proposed by the study for each traffic and transport issue investigated and proposes various recommendations which address the issues in the area.

 

Background

 

The April 2018 Council meeting resolved the following:-

1.   Investigate issues raised by residents and any other matters deemed appropriate for the Lane Cove North area;

2.   Commence a holistic traffic study for the Lane Cove North / Mowbray Precinct; and

3.   Keep the residents and community stakeholders informed of its findings.

In addition to the above resolution, a petition comprising 50 signatures from residents of Gordon Crescent and Kullah Parade, as well as visitors to Mindarie Park was received by Council. In response to this, a report was submitted to the July 2019 Council meeting where Council resolved that:

1.   A review of road safety along Gordon Crescent and Kullah Parade be included in the scope of the Lane Cove North Traffic Study;

2.   The consultants undertaking the review of the traffic management in the precinct be requested to consider the removal of parking on the northern side of Gordon Crescent where there are bends in the road.

 

Council commissioned Bitzios Consulting to undertake the Lane Cove North Traffic Study. The study area is bounded by major roads of Mowbray Road West, Pacific Highway, Longueville Road and Epping Road as shown in AT-2.

 

While the study focused on ten specific issues, the study also involved reviewing resident complaints received by Council in the last five years to identify any additional issues. All resident complaints reviewed were found to be in the context of the issues investigated as part of the study.

 

Bitzios Consulting was commissioned to investigate the following:-

 

1.   Right turn from Elizabeth Parade into Centennial Avenue;

 

2.   Pedestrian safety on Centennial Avenue (Mowbray Road West to Epping Road);

 

3.   Speed limit review on local streets east of Centennial Avenue;

 

4.   Introduction of a right turn from Mowbray Road West onto Pacific Highway;

 

5.   Introduction of a right turn from Centennial Avenue onto Epping Road;

 

6.   Dealing with rat-running movements on local streets east of Centennial Avenue;

 

7.   Feasibility of a median / splitter island on Kurri Street at the Karilla Avenue intersection;

 

8.   Non-compliant left turns into Parklands Avenue;

 

9.   Public transport services in vicinity to the Mowbray Road West precinct; and

 

10. Road Safety Review of Kullah Parade.

 

 

Discussion

 

 

1.   Right turn from Elizabeth Parade into Centennial Avenue

 

The right turn from Elizabeth Parade into Centennial Avenue was investigated in terms of its crash history, Safe Intersection Sight Distance, road geometry and proximity to other intersections. The following were the findings of the investigation:-

 

·    Between June 2013 and June 2018, seven crashes occurred at the intersection of Centennial Avenue and Elizabeth Parade associated with the right turn. None of which involved vulnerable road users;

 

·    Location of the bus stop on Centennial Avenue (western side) reduces visibility when exiting the intersection. There is insufficient Safe Intersection Sight distance when a stationary bus is present at the bus stop;

 

·    Elizabeth Parade is located at a trough resulting in tendency for vehicles to travel at greater speeds along Centennial Avenue; and

 

·    Close proximity of side roads may result in possible indicator misjudgement by other motorists.

 

Treatment Proposals:

 

Bitzios Consulting recommended several treatment options to improve safety at the Elizabeth Parade/Centennial Avenue intersection. Council has reviewed the following treatment options and has recommended a preferred option.

 

Treatment

Advantages

Disadvantages

Council Comment

Raised median to restrict right turns

·    Prevents right turns in and out of Elizabeth Parade

 

·    Continues to allow access to Elizabeth Parade from Centennial Avenue northbound

·    Traffic would be diverted to Centennial/Mowbray intersection and worsening its traffic condition and performance

 

·    Some driveways located on the southern side of Mowbray Road West have poor sight lines to the east. Vehicles from these driveways will have to turn right onto Mowbray Road West eastbound to access Centennial Avenue. This may raise the chance of Right-Near crashes.

·    A raised median would address the crashes associated with the right turn without significantly hindering access for residents. Residents are able to access Epping Road via Elizabeth Parade and Mowbray Road via the signals at Kullah Parade. Residents are able to access Gordon Crescent via Epping Road and Centennial Avenue or via the signalised intersection at Kullah Parade.

 

·    While it is acknowledged that this may worsen conditions at the Mowbray Road/Centennial Avenue intersection, this intersection will be upgraded to include a designated right turn bay and a signalised right turn arrow in future.


Complete closure

·    Prevents right turns in and out of Elizabeth Parade

 

·    Also prevents left turns into Elizabeth Parade and its relevant issues (indicator judgment, slowing down too late etc.)

·    All traffic accessing Elizabeth Parade, including former rat runners, would have to access from Centennial / Mowbray intersection, worsening their performance. Alternatively, they

may also utilise other rat running routes instead.

 

·    Residents’ travel routes will have to change and detoured

 

·    Some driveways located on the southern side of Mowbray Road West have poor sight

lines to the east.

 

·    Vehicles from

these driveways will have to turn right onto Mowbray Road

 

·    West eastbound to access Centennial Avenue. This may

raise the chance of Right-Near crashes.

 

·    Does not warrant a complete closure as the main cause of accidents are the right turns. A complete closure would also hinder access for residents.

No Right Turn Ban (into Centennial

Avenue southbound)

·    Prevents right turn from Elizabeth Parade into

Centennial Avenue

·    Traffic would be diverted to Centennial / Mowbray

intersection and worsening its traffic condition and

performance

 

·    The effectiveness of the ban is dependent upon enforcement at the subject intersection.

·    This option requires enforcement to be effective. NSW Police do not always have the resources to regularly enforce local restrictions in particular during peak hours.

Channelised right turn, S-lane, protected right turn

·    Allows right turning vehicles to Elizabeth Parade (from Centennial Avenue) to have their own waiting lane

 

·    Right turn from Elizabeth

Parade will only turn across three lanes instead of four

 

·    All traffic movements will still be allowed.

·    Centennial Avenue

southbound will be reduced to just one lane

 

·    Necessitates moving of southbound bus stop.

·    This option would narrow down Centennial Avenue to one lane. TfNSW has advised that this is not favourable for through traffic. Furthermore, the investigation of a pedestrian refuge at this location would further narrow down Centennial Avenue.


 

Relocation of northbound bus stop further north

·    Resolves the limited sight distance issue of a stopped

northbound bus

 

·    Shorter walking for

passengers living in the

complex

 

·    Can be used in conjunction with another treatment.

·    Further walking for passengers living/accessing south of Elizabeth Parade to/from the bus stop.

·    Council has liaised with  State Transit Authority (STA) and have relocated the bus stop north of Elizabeth Parade.


Timed closure

·    Similar to complete closure but only during certain hours

(peak hours etc.) on weekdays

 

·    Allows normal access to Elizabeth Parade outside peak hours.

·    Difficult to enforce consistently over extended periods.

·    This option requires enforcement. NSW Police do not always have the resources to regularly enforce local restrictions during peak hours.

 

Conclusion

 

Considering the crash history and the lack of Safe Intersection Sight Distance, the study considers six options to improve safety at the Centennial Avenue/Elizabeth Parade intersection. A raised median to restrict right turns is the preferred option given that it is self-enforcing and causes minimal disruption to residents accessing Epping Road which can alternatively be accessed via Elizabeth Parade. 

 

Recommendation

 

Subject to consultation with affected residents and approval of the Traffic Committee, Council to implement a raised median to restrict right turn from Elizabeth Parade into Centennial Avenue. The raised median is to be implemented to coincide with the upgrade of Mowbray Road/Centennial Avenue intersection.

 

2.   Pedestrian safety on Centennial Avenue (Mowbray Road West to Epping Road)

 

There is a clear need for a pedestrian and cyclist crossing facility along Centennial Avenue between Mowbray Road West and Epping Road.

 

The demand for pedestrians is generated by the residential apartment complex at 7-13 Centennial Avenue comprising of 2013 units which represents a high proportion of residential dwellings on Centennial Avenue. The complex includes facilities such as a gym, simmering pool and café which may potentially attract passing pedestrians.

 

The apartment complex is serviced by a bus stop which is located mid-block between Mowbray Road West and Epping Road. The closest crossing points are at the signalised intersections of Mowbray Road West and Epping Road which is approximately 250 – 270 metres from the bus stop.

 

Pedestrians often cross four lanes of traffic along Centennial Avenue to access the bus stops.

 

Treatment Proposals:

 

Bitzios consulting has recommended the following options to improve pedestrian and cyclist safety and access across Centennial Avenue given the presence the bus stops. Council has reviewed the following options and has recommended its preferred option.

 

Treatment

Advantages

Disadvantages

Council Comment

Pedestrian Refuge Island

·    Pedestrians can stand

safely and wait for traffic in the centre of Centennial

Avenue.

 

·    Pedestrians will only have to look at one direction of traffic

at a time.

·    Due to narrow lane widths of Centennial Avenue, kerb extensions (road narrowing) is

needed, reducing Centennial Avenue to one lane in each

direction. This results in the loss of the outer lanes.

 

·    Despite so, it is not much different to current conditions as the outer lane is often used as parking lane. However, some parking spaces will have to be removed.

·    Council has previously liaised with TfNSW regarding a pedestrian refuge. While the concept has not been previously supported by TfNSW due to the reduction in capacity, it is essential that a safe crossing facility is provided to access the bus stops on either side of Centennial Avenue.

Signalised mid-block crossing

·    Offers pedestrian protection

 

·    Signals give pedestrians

greater priority

·    Costly

 

·    Hard for vehicles to slow down and come to a stop due to the slope nature of the road, and

may hit a pedestrian.

·    Previous correspondence with TfNSW indicated that this would not be supported due to the close proximity to existing lights at Epping Road/Centennial Avenue and Mowbray Road/Centennial Avenue.

 

Conclusion

 

Given the pedestrian demand generated from the unit complex at 7-13 Centennial Avenue comprising of approximately 200 units and the location of the bus stops on either side of Centennial Avenue, it is essential to provide a safe crossing facility for pedestrians.

 

As such, the provision of a pedestrian refuge is currently being considered by Council. While this would narrow Centennial Avenue to one lane of traffic in either direction, it is important to balance the needs of all road users. It should be noted that the implementation of a pedestrian refuge may not reduce capacity through Centennial Avenue in comparison to existing conditions as the outer lane is currently utilised for parking.

 

Recommendation

 

Council to continue to liaise with TfNSW to gain approval for a pedestrian refuge mid-block of Centennial Avenue.


 

3.   Speed limit review on local streets east of Centennial Avenue

 

Analysis of resident complaints have highlighted the potential speeding issues along local streets east of Centennial Avenue. As such the study investigated the suitability of the current speed limit through the assessment of vehicle speeds, volumes, crash history and observed driver behaviour.

 

Traffic volumes and speed data were provided for Karilla Avenue, Kurri Street Kyong Street (between Parklands Avenue and Landers Road), Landers Road. The surveys were undertaken between 12th and 26th August 2016.

 

Traffic volumes

 

The Average Daily Traffic volumes for all surveyed streets are shown in Figure 1.

 

The RMS Guide to Traffic Generating Developments 2002 recommends that a typical residential street should ideally exhibit a traffic flow of less than 2,000 vpd, with an objective of less than 1,500 vpd to maintain a comfortable traffic environment for local residents.

 

The Average Daily Traffic volumes for all surveyed streets are well below the capacity for a local road as prescribed in the RMS Guide.

 

When a growth factor of 7% is applied to the traffic volumes in Karilla Avenue (in line with the SIDRA model used for Centennial Avenue in Section 5), the volumes are still well below the RMS Environmental Capacity.

 

Traffic speeds

 

The 85th percentile speed limit for each surveyed street is shown in Figure 2.

 

The 85th percentile speeds at each survey site shows similar speeds in each direction. Lower speeds were recorded along Kurri Street and Kyong Street at 35 km/h. The 85th percentile speeds for Karilla Avenue and Landers Road was recorded to be 54km/h and 51km/h respectively.

 

Crash Analysis

 

Crash data between June 2013 to June 2018 was analysed. In the local streets east of Centennial Avenue, there were eight crashes recorded with seven non-causality crashes and one injury crash. The injury crash occurred in Kara Street and involved a cyclist.

 

This does not include crashes along Mowbray Road West, Centennial Avenue, Epping Road or Pacific Highway.

 

Conclusion

 

The average daily traffic volumes for all surveyed streets were well below the capacity for local streets as prescribed in RMS Guide to Traffic Generating Developments.

 

While the 85th percentile speed limit for Karilla Avenue and Landers Road was measured to be slightly over the speed limit, NSW Police have advised that enforcement will only be carried out if speeding is observed to be excessive (i.e. 10km/h over the posted speed limit).

 

The review of speed, volume and crash data does not show the need for a reduced speed limit.

 

However, Section 6 of this report recommends speed humps to reduce rat-running through the local streets which will assist in reducing the 85th percentile speed limit.

 

Recommendation

 

Council to continue to monitor the traffic speed and volumes through the area.

 

Figure 1: Average Daily Traffic Volumes

 

              

 

Figure 2: 85th Percentile Speed

 

4.   Introduction of a right turn from Mowbray Road West onto Pacific Highway

 

The introduction of a right turn from Mowbray Road West into Pacific Highway was investigated as part of the study. This movement will allow easier access for residents travelling from Mowbray Road to Pacific Highway and towards the City.

 

Methodology

 

A preliminary sensitivity analysis was undertaken in SIDRA to get an indication of the impacts of the introduction of the right turn from Mowbray Road West into Pacific Highway.

 

The base model (representing existing conditions) was built based on an available Saturday traffic turning volume count (from a previous 2018 study) and analysing the traffic volume counts east of the intersection and adjusting the volumes to reflect a typical weekday AM and PM flow through the intersection. Further to this, the SCATS data (for phasing of the intersection) was also obtained and inputted into the model.

 

This level of detail is fit for the purpose for a preliminary investigation. If a more detailed impact assessment of the right turn movement is to be considered, an area wide road network model will be considered.

 

The project case model (representing the proposed right turn) uses the same layout as the base case model with the addition of right turning vehicles from the right most lane on the Mowbray Road West approach. This means that the right most lane is proposed as a shared through and right turn lane.

The phasing remains unchanged from the base case and the introduction of the right turn is provided as a filtered turn.

The traffic volumes remained unchanged from the base case model, with the exception of the right turn volumes.

Right turn volumes were increased in increments of 10 vph from 0 vph to 60 vph to demonstrate the change in intersection performance with increasing right turning vehicles.

Results

The sensitivity analysis shows that the limit on the number of right turn vehicles which caused the Degree of Saturation (DOS) to exceed 1 (meaning the intersection demand exceeds the capacity) on the Mowbray Road West approach is as follows:

AM Peak: 15 vph

PM Peak: 50 vph

Weekend Peak: 20 vph

The results show significant deterioration of the intersection with each iteration with unacceptably high delays.

Changes to lane arrangements and intersection geometry is required to minimise the impacts on intersection performance, if a right turn was introduced from Mowbray Road West into Pacific Highway.


 

Conclusion

 

The high-level analysis indicates that the Pacific Highway/Mowbray Road intersection deteriorates significantly with the introduction of a right turn without any changes to lane arrangements and intersection geometry.

An area wide model is required to determine the specific impact on the intersection.

Given that the introduction of a right turn will have significant benefits to local streets east of Centennial avenue, Council should monitor any opportunities that may allow the introduction of a right turn from Mowbray Road West into Pacific Highway.

Recommendation

 

Council to liaise with TfNSW to identify any opportunities that may allow the introduction of a right turn from Mowbray Road West into Pacific Highway.

 

5.   Introduction of a right turn from Centennial Avenue onto Epping Road

 

A preliminary sensitivity analysis was undertaken in SIDRA to get an indication of the impacts of the introduction of the right turn from Centennial Avenue (north approach) into Epping Road.

 

This movement is currently allowed for buses only through a designated right turn arrow.

 

Methodology

 

The methodology used is similar to that of Section 4 where traffic counts from 2016 were utilised applying a growth rate of 7% in the surrounding area.

 

A base model was created based on exiting conditions and the project case model was created with the proposed right turn movement. The right turn movement was accommodated through testing options for phasing arrangements. The phasing arrangement that provides the best overall intersection performance was used to test the project case.

 

Results

Similar to that of Section 4, significant impacts were observed during each modelled period with unacceptable delays. The following is the maximum limit of right turning vehicles which caused the DOS to exceed 1 on the Centennial Avenue (north) approach:

 

AM Peak: 15 vph

Pm Peak: 20 vph

Weekend Peak: 10vph

Given the impacts shown in the preliminary study, TfNSW are unlikely to be supportive of the introduction of the right turn from Centennial Avenue (North approach) to Epping Road.


 

Conclusion

 

The high-level sensitivity analysis indicates that the Epping Road/Centennial Avenue intersection deteriorates significantly with the introduction of a right turn.

 

Recommendation

 

The current right turn restriction remain at the Epping Road/Centennial Avenue intersection (north approach).

 

6.   Dealing with rat-running movements on local streets east of Centennial Avenue

 

Rat-running movements on local streets east of Centennial Avenue has been the focal point of many resident complaints and investigation by Council. The study further investigated the potential rat-running issues in the Lane Cove North area.

In the AM peak, ‘rat running’ is most likely occurring due to the delays experienced on Epping Road between Centennial Avenue and Parklands Avenue. The long delays and queues encourage traffic to avoid this section of Epping Road by using local streets and enter Longueville Road at Parklands Avenue to access Warringah Freeway and Pacific Highway.

 

In the PM peak, due to the busy right turn traffic from Epping Road (westbound) to Centennial Avenue, drivers seeking to travel northbound on Centennial Avenue are likely to use the previously available intersection at Parklands Avenue / Epping Road / Longueville Road to turn right and are therefore more likely to take local streets to access the intersection.

 

The study identified two primary rat-run routes as follows:

 

Route 1 – Centennial Avenue, Karilla Avenue

 

Route 2 – Ralston Street, Murray Street, Stokes Street, Nunda Street, Parklands Avenue

 

There are variations to Route 1 as follows:

 

1A – Karilla Avenue, Kurri Street, Kyong Street, Landers Road, Parklands Avenue

 

1B –  Karilla Avenue, Kurri Street, Parklands Avenue

 

For the purposes of this exercise, only Route 1 has been considered.

 

A number of Origin-Destination (O-D) surveys have been previously conducted assessing the extent of rat-running along Route 1. These surveys are summarised in Table 1. The surveys were undertaken between the same locations, shown as ‘A’ and ‘B’ in Figure 3.


 

Table 1: Previous O-D Surveys

 

ID

Date & Time

Period

Vehicles recorded

at Location A

Vehicles recorded at

Location B

Direction

1

Wednesday, 9/9/15

(07:00-09:00 AM)

Left turns from

Centennial Ave to

Karilla Avenue only

Left turns from

Parklands Avenue to

Longueville Road only

Route 1A

(citybound)

only

2

Thursday, 3/12/15

(24-hours)

All vehicles

All vehicles

Both

Directions

 

3

Thursday 15/9/16

(24-hours)

All vehicles

All vehicles

Both

Directions

 

 

Figure 3: Origin Destination Survey Locations

 

Summary of Data:

 

A summary of vehicle volumes captured between Point A and Point B as part of the three O-D surveys is provided in Table 2.


 

 

 

Table 2 – Summary of Route 1 O-D survey

 

AM Peak (07:00-09:00)

PM Peak (16:00-18:00)

OD Survey

Route 1A

(Citybound)

Route 1B

(Northbound)

Route 1A

(Citybound)

Route 1B

(Northbound)

1

62*

-

-

-

2

106

55

44

170

3

85

20

37

138

Avg

84

38

41

154

*Left turning vehicles from Centennial Avenue and Left turning vehicles to Longueville Road only.

 

Rat-running volumes were compared to total number of vehicles captured at Locations A and B in each survey during the Am peak as is presented in Table 2.

 

Table 3 – Citybound Volumes (AM Peak)

OD Survey

Location A

(Eastbound)

Location B

(Southbound)

Rat-running

volumes

(Route 1A)

1

172*

379^

62*^

2

193

690

106

3

151

569

85

Avg

172

546

84

*Left turning vehicles from Centennial Avenue

^Left turning vehicles to Longueville Road only

 

Table 4 – Northbound Volumes (PM Peak)

OD Survey

Location A

(Eastbound)

Location B

(Southbound)

Rat-running

volumes

(Route 1A)

2

488

211

138

3

581

198

170

Avg

535

205

154

 

It should be noted that in Table 3, the total vehicles captured during OD Survey 1 do not include any of the following vehicles (whether local or rat-running):-

 

·    right-turning vehicles from Centennial Avenue into Karilla Avenue;

·    right-turning vehicles from Parklands Avenue to Epping Road; and

·    through traffic from Parklands Avenue to Longueville Road southbound.

 

Therefore, the average number of rat-running traffic along Route 1A is expected to be higher.

From the data, there are approximately 300 more vehicles passing through Location B than Location A in the appropriate direction during each peak period. The larger number of vehicles at Location B is most likely attributed to:-

 

·    Local residents within Zone 1 driving towards/from the City (or Epping Road); and

·    Other through traffic taking alternative rat running routes through Zone 1 (i.e. via Stokes Street) but not via Location A.

 

Table 4 shows the total volumes in the PM peak and the portion of rat-runners.

 

Options to prevent rat-running

 

To reduce the number of vehicles taking Route 1 and reduce the proportion of through traffic along local streets, the route would need be slower and/or less convenient for drivers. This may be achieved by increasing the travel time along the rat-running routes through a series of slow points.

 

Turn bans were considered as possible alternatives to increase travel time. However, turn bans would significantly impact resident amenity and the ability to access Mowbray Public School and Chatswood centre are greatly reduced.

 

Previous Consultation Rounds

 

Council undertook two rounds of extensive community Consultation with regard to the proposed partial closure of Karilla Avenue at Centennial Avenue. The latest round of consultation undertaken in September 2018 was in relation to trial a partial road closure on Karilla Avenue at the intersection of Centennial Avenue for a period of six or 12 months.

 

53% of respondents did not support the trial.

 

A summary of the comments made by residents are as follows:-

·         The proposed partial closure will limit access to Mowbray Public School, M2 and Chatswood. Accessing these areas via Epping Road would add an extra 10–15 minutes of travel time;

·         The partial closure will displace congestion to other streets;

·         The left turn restriction from Kurri into Parklands Avenue must be addressed if the proposed partial closure is implemented;

·         Access to Mowbray Road and Centennial Avenue is already limited from Landers Road; and

·         Right turn restriction from Centennial Avenue into Epping Road must be addressed.

 

The 2018 consultation results and comments made by residents were consistent with that of 2016.

 

Conclusion

 

The surveys indicate that there is some level of rat-running along the streets east of Centennial Avenue. However, as discussed in Section 3 (Speed Limit review), the total traffic volumes are well below the RMS environmental capacity.

 

Several options (i.e. turn bans and slow points) were considered to prevent rat-running through the local area. Council has previously undertaken two rounds of extensive consultation where the majority of residents did not support turn bans at the Centennial Avenue/Karilla Avenue intersection.

 

As such, a series of speed humps is proposed which will reduce the proportion of rat-runners accessing the local streets east of Centennial Avenue. Furthermore, the speed humps will also reduce the 85th percentile speeds.

 

Recommendation                               

 

Subject to approval of the Traffic Committee and consultation with affected residents, install speed humps in the locations outlined in AT-3.

 

7.   Feasibility of a median / splitter island on Kurri Street at the Karilla Avenue intersection

 

Residents have made a number of comments relating to vehicle movements at both ends of Kurri Street including:-

 

·         Vehicles cutting the corner at Karilla Avenue, crossing into the opposing travel lane; and

·         Vehicles illegally turning left into Parklands Avenue at the current ‘No Left Turn’ restriction.

 

A site inspection on 12th September 2019 revealed that the majority of right-turning vehicles from Karilla Avenue to Kurri Street were observed to turn prematurely with a large turn radius, crossing over the double barrier line and into the opposing lane.

 

To ensure that vehicles do not cut the corner at the Karilla Avenue/Kurri Street intersection, it is recommended that a splitter island be installed on Kurri Street as shown in AT-4.

 

In addition to guiding (forcing) vehicles onto the correct side of the road when turning, the splitter island also increases the turning angle, creating a sharper turn for vehicles turning right into Kurri Street. This will slow approach and turning speeds which is considered to be a safety benefit in this residential area.

 

The ‘No Stopping’ zone on the eastern side of Kurri Street will need to be extended (subject to detailed design) to accommodate larger vehicle turn paths. Kerbside space for up to two vehicles may need to be removed.

 

Conclusion

 

Observations during the site investigation revealed that there are a number of vehicles cutting the corner at the Karilla Avenue/Kurri Street intersection.

 

To ensure slower vehicle speeds and that vehicles do not cut the corner, a splitter island is proposed to be installed on Kurri Street as shown in AT-4.

 


 

Recommendation

Subject to Traffic Committee approval, a splitter island is proposed on the Kurri Street approach to the intersection shown in AT-4 to address safety concerns associated with the corner cutting behaviour.

 

8.   Non-compliant left turns into Parklands Avenue

 

A site inspection on 12th September 2019 revealed a number of vehicles were observed to turn left from Kurri Street and through from Parklands Avenue (west) to Parklands Avenue (east) despite three separate regulatory signs placed near the one-way exit and an unfavourable geometry. Most left turning vehicles hesitate before turning or wait until there is no other traffic.

 

To reduce the likelihood of a vehicle turning into the one way exit on Parklands Avenue, a raised platform / flat top road hump has been proposed. The raised platform / flat top road hump treatment provides the following benefits:-

 

·    Reduces traffic speeds of traffic exiting Parklands Avenue (east);

 

·    Produces a vertical deflection in the road which may be uncomfortable for drivers turning left (i.e. driving over a hump at an angle) and may further deter drivers performing the left turn;

 

·    May delay a vehicle turning left (hesitate) long enough such that drivers are instead encouraged to continue westbound in the presence of other traffic;

 

·    May tie in with the existing traffic island; and

 

·    Creates a contrasting gateway highlighting a change in road conditions, further highlighting the local, one-way nature of the street section (acting in a similar way to an entry threshold).

 

The inclusion of additional signage further reinforces the turn restriction.

 

Given the school bus route along Parklands Avenue, the platform has been designed with a 75mm height to conform with STA Bus Infrastructure Guidelines.

27

The concept design plan of the raised platform on Parklands Avenue is provided in AT-5.

 

Conclusion

 

Site observations revealed that there are several vehicles undertaking the illegal left turn from Kurri Street into Parklands Avenue.

 

While enforcement has been undertaken at this location, Council continues to receive complaints regarding illegal left turns. To deter vehicles from undertaking this illegal manoeuvre, a raised platform is proposed on Parklands Avenue.

 

            The platform has been designed to confirm with STA Bus Infrastructure Guidelines.

 

The concept design plan of the raised platform on Parklands Avenue is provided in AT-5.

 


 

Recommendation

Subject to Traffic Committee approval and community consultation, Council implement a raised platform on Parklands Avenue as per the concept design in AT-5.

 

9.   Public transport services in vicinity to the Mowbray Road West precinct

 

As part of the review of public transport servicing the study area, a high-level supply versus demand assessment was undertaken to determine the level of bus service usage and whether services are adequate or at capacity.

 

The assessment included review of travel mode and places of work data to approximate the number of workers catching buses and approximate number of seats/capacities of specific bus services available for residents travelling to their place of work.

 

The following methodology was adopted to perform the supply / demand assessment:-

 

·    Journey to Work Data and Census data was used to determine the approximate number of Lane Cove North residents (demand) utilising bus services to their specific places of work or to train stations;

 

·    Bus routes with destinations near or within these places of work were identified and the number of services of these specific bus routes was determined based on frequency and timetable information;

 

·    The travel demand was distributed amongst bus routes based on the number of available services per route;

 

·    The available capacity of each bus route was estimated by the number of services and the seating and standing room of each service;

 

·    An occupancy factor was applied to reduce capacity to emulate passengers boarding the bus from upstream areas (based on Census data); and

 

·    The approximate available vacant spaces (supply) available per route was determined and compared to the previously identified travel demand to determine adequacy of the bus services.

 

The following key assumptions were used as part of the assessment:-

 

·    Workers travel between 6:30 AM and 9:30 AM, therefore only bus services operating in the proximity of the study area within these times are included;

 

·    Workers travel between 4:30 PM to 7:30 PM, therefore only bus services operating in the proximity of the study area within these times are included; and

 

·    All buses are rigid buses, which have an assumed combined seating/standing capacity of 70.

Table 4 depicts the supply vs demand for various bus routes operating in the Mowbray Road precinct. the high-level analysis shows that the supply meets demand.

 


Table 4 – Bus Routes

Route

Destination (LGA)

Capacity

Occupancy

Supply

Demand

Adequate

143

Willoughby

560

336

224

111

Yes

North Sydney & Northern Beaches

420

252

168

38

Yes

144

Willoughby

350

210

140

69

Yes

North Sydney & Northern Beaches

490

294

196

44

Yes

200

Willoughby

560

336

224

111

Yes

City of Sydney & beyond

560

336

224

93

Yes

251

City of Sydney

1260

203

1057

147

Yes

252

City of Sydney & North Sydney

560

74

486

44

Yes

253

City of Sydney

1050

291

759

122

Yes

254

North Sydney

560

61

499

28

Yes

261 (School special)

Willoughby

70

42

28

14

Yes

285

City of Sydney

560

90

470

65

Yes

286

North Sydney

350

67

283

17

Yes

287

North Sydney

420

68

352

21

Yes

288

City of Sydney

1470

811

659

171

Yes

Ryde

630

441

189

18

Yes

290

Ryde

70

49

21

2

Yes

291

North Sydney

630

97

533

31

Yes

Ryde

420

294

126

12

Yes

292

City of Sydney

1540

413

1127

179

Yes

Ryde

350

245

105

10

Yes

294

City of Sydney

1400

225

1175

163

Yes

Ryde

560

392

168

16

Yes

530

Willoughby

490

294

196

97

Yes

533

Willoughby

910

546

364

180

Yes

Ryde & beyond

770

539

231

22

Yes

536

Willoughby

630

378

252

125

Yes

622

North Sydney

420

225

1175

21

Yes

 


 

Conclusion

 

Table 4 depicts the supply vs demand for the various bus routes operating in the Mowbray Road precinct. The high-level assessment indicates that the demand meets supply for bus services in the Mowbray Road precinct. However, as the number of unit developments continue to increase in the precinct, Council will also continue to monitor the demand for public transport and if necessary lobby the NSW Government for additional services.

 

Recommendation

 

Council to monitor the demand for bus services in the Mowbray Road precinct and lobby the NSW Government for additional bus services if necessary.

 

10. Road Safety Review of Kullah Parade

The July 2019 Council meeting resolved to include a review of road safety along Gordon Crescent and Kullah Parade be included traffic study.

Bitzios Consulting has undertaken site inspections and have identified road safety improvements to Gordon Crescent and Kullah Parade as follows:

 

Issue

Site Illustration

Recommendation

Conflicting Parking Restrictions

Parking restrictions along the western side of Kullah Parade are conflicting with line marking. Signs allow vehicles to park

 

 

Yellow line marking has been removed and are consistent with the parking signage.

Parking Arrangement and Travel Paths

 

Due to parking arrangements on either side of the bend, vehicles will tend to cross into the opposite side of the road.

 

Westbound vehicles will be required to take a tighter turn to avoid parked vehicles on the western kerb. Similarly, eastbound vehicles will be required to take a wider turn to avoid parked vehicles on the northern kerb (see figure).

These travel paths would conflict with each other, which may lead to a ‘head on’ or ‘side swipe’ type collision on approach or through the bend.

 

This issue may be particularly dangerous with larger/heavy vehicles.

 

Subject to Traffic Committee approval:

 

Continue ‘No Stopping’ zone further east 12 metres on the northern side of bend.

 

Install additional ‘No Stopping’ sign

 

Install centreline around the bend.

 

 

Roadside Vegetation

 

Trees and shrubs were observed to be growing near the roadway along the southern kerb. Vegetation was also found to be overgrown on and near the bend (outside No. 10) reducing available sight distances along the roadway and through the bend. This may increase the risk of a driver not seeing another approaching vehicle, leading to a ‘head on’ or ‘side swipe’ collision.

 

Further, in the event a westbound vehicle must make an evasive manoeuvre into the kerbside, the roadside is not clear to allow for that to happen.

Remove or trim vegetation to increase sight distances and improve visibility through the bend.

Cars parked on Bend

 

Vehicles were observed to park at the apex of the bend outside No. 10 along the northern kerb.

 

This presents the following issues:

 

Effectively reduced roadway for vehicles travelling through the bend

 

Presence of vehicles will lead to eastbound drivers shying away from the northern side and into the opposing travel lane (see item 6)

Restricts / eliminates chance for eastbound vehicles to escape should an evasive manoeuvre be required.

 

These issues all increase the risk of a ‘head on’ or ‘side swipe’ type of collision.

This is not a significant bend. As such does not warrant the removal of parking.

Vehicle Travel Paths

Vehicles were often observed to cross the centre of the road when travelling along Kullah Parade, primarily due to presence of vehicles parked on the northern kerb.

 

Vehicles were also observed to approach bends using both lanes. No centre line marking is provided along Kullah Parade.

This is not a significant bend. As such does not warrant the removal of parking.

Cars parked on Bend

Similar to issue 5, vehicles were observed to park at the apex of the bend outside No. 22 along the northern kerb.

 

This presents the following issues:

 

Effectively reduced roadway for vehicles travelling through the bend

 

Presence of vehicles will lead to eastbound drivers shying away from the northern side and into the opposing travel lane (see item 6)

 

Restricts / eliminates chance for eastbound vehicles to escape should an evasive manoeuvre be required.

 

These issues all increase the risk of a ‘head on’ or ‘side swipe’ type of collision

Subject to Traffic Committee approval, implement 50 metres of No Stopping around bend.

 

Install centreline around bend.

 

Roadside Vegetation

Similar to Issue 4, trees and shrubs were observed to be growing near the roadway along the southern kerb.

Vegetation was also found to be overgrown on and near the bend (outside No. 40) reducing available sight distances along the roadway and through the bend.

 

This may increase the risk of a driver not seeing another approaching vehicle, leading to a ‘head on’ or ‘side swipe’ collision.

 

Further, in the event a westbound vehicle must make an evasive manoeuvre into the kerbside, the roadside is not clear of obstructions, which may lead to a vehicle striking a tree or similar.

Remove or trim vegetation to increase sight distances and improve visibility through the bend.

Side Street and Visibility

The kerbside vegetation near the intersection of Kullah Parade and Girraween Street limits visibility through the bend. In combination with the potential distraction of a vehicle emerging from Girraween Street, drivers may not be aware of an oncoming vehicle.

This significantly increases the risk of a ‘head on’ or ‘side wipe’ type collision.

Subject to Traffic Committee approval, implement approximately 54 metres of ‘No Stopping’ around bend (between driveways of 36 and intersection of Girraween Avenue.

 

Increase visibility by trimming or removing vegetation on kerbside.

Parked Vehicles and Poor Geometry

Vehicles were observed to park along the northern kerbside immediately prior and through the curve outside No 70 (Gordons Crescent).

As the roadway has both a curve and a crest at this location, the parked vehicles greatly reduce visibility through the bend, particularly for eastbound vehicles (as shown).

This significantly increases the risk of a ‘head on’ type or ‘side swipe’ type collision.

Parking does not need to be removed as there is adequate visibility at the crest.

 

Roadside Vegetation and Sight Lines

The overgrown kerbside vegetation on the southern side of the bend outside No 70 Gordons Crescent restricts visibility through the bend and dip. Overhanging branches reduce sight lines through the bend. This may result in drivers not seeing an oncoming vehicle, which may lead to a ‘head on’ or ‘side swipe’ type collision.

Further, westbound drivers may not be aware of the resuming of parking east of the bend, as parked vehicles may not be seen on approach, which may result in a collision with a parked vehicle or require the driver to make an evasive manoeuvre.

Trim vegetation and overhanging branches to improve sight lines

Kink and Pinch point

The sudden change in road alignment outside No 70 Gordons Crescent produces a kink in the roadway, such that eastbound drivers shy away from the kerb or may need to take a wider turn to avoid clipping the southern kerb. As a result, vehicles drift into the opposing travel lane, which increases the risk of a head on or side swipe type collision.

 

In addition, the geometry of the roadway produces a pinch point where the road narrows, exacerbating the issue above.

 

Reviewers note that a near- miss was experienced at this location whilst undergoing a drive through of the road.

Subject to approval of the Traffic Committee, install centreline marking around bend.

Vehicles Parked on bend

Whilst the roadway at this location (bend outside No 86 Gordons Crescent) appears to be sufficiently wide for two way traffic, vehicles parked along the northern kerb cause eastbound vehicles to shy away from the northern kerb, crossing into the opposing direction of traffic.

Combined with reduced visibility through the bend (due to roadside vegetation), this increases the potential for a ‘head on’ or side swipe type collision.

It should be noted reviewers experienced a near miss at this location whilst undertaking a drive through of the road

Subject to Traffic Committee approval implement No Stopping from the boundary of 84 Gordon Crescent to the existing ‘No Stopping’ zone approximately 20 metres.

 

Install centerline around bend.

‘Hidden’ Driveways

Parked vehicles along the kerbside reduces visibility to and from various driveways along Kullah Parade and Gordons Crescent.

 

Drivers may not see a vehicle emerging from a driveway (or vice versa) which may result in a collision. This would be particularly dangerous in the event vehicles are approaching from each directional at the same time.

Vehicles exiting driveways on to the Kullah Parade or Gordon Crescent are to do so in a forward direction.

 

Council will review each driveway on request from residents.

 

Conclusion

 

The review of Kullah Parade and Gordon Crescent indicates the need for removal of parking around some bends. To ensure that vehicles do not speed around these bends, the installation of double centerlines is also proposed.

 

Recommendation

 

Subject to Traffic Committee approval, implement ‘No Stopping’ zones and double centrelines around the bends of Kullah Parade and Gordon Crescent.

 

Conclusion

 

Council commissioned Bitzios Consulting to undertake the Lane Cove North Traffic Study (AT-1). The study area is bounded by major roads of Mowbray Road West, Pacific Highway, Longueville Road and Epping Road. The study area is shown in AT-2.

 

While the study focused on ten specific issues, the study also involved reviewing resident complaints received by Council in the last five years to identify any additional issues. All resident complaints reviewed were found to be in the context of the issues investigated as part of the study.

 

In general, the study recommends improvements to the Centennial Avenue/Elizabeth Parade intersection through the installation of a raised median and provision of a pedestrian refuge on Centennial Avenue.

 

The speed limit review undertaken on local streets east of Centennial Avenue does not indicate an immediate need to reduce the speed limit.

 

In regard to the introduction of a right turn from Mowbray Road West onto Pacific Highway, while the high-level analysis indicates that there will be significant deterioration of the intersection without any intersection upgrades, Council will seek opportunities that may allow further investigation of the right turn into Pacific Highway given the benefits to the community.

 

Similarly, the study shows that the introduction of a right turn from Centennial Avenue into Epping Road will significantly deteriorate the intersection without an intersection upgrade. As such, the existing right-turn restriction is to remain on the northern approach.

 

The study also investigated the rat-running movements on local streets east of Centennial Avenue and concluded that while there is some level of rat-running, the overall traffic volume of the streets is well below the environmental capacity for a local road. However, a series of speed humps is proposed in several locations to deter rat-runners.

 

The study also recommends a splitter island on Kurri Street at the Karilla Avenue intersection to ensure vehicles do not cross over to oncoming traffic.

 

To further address the issue of vehicles illegally turning left into Parklands Avenue from Kurri Street, the study recommends a raised platform.

 

A public transport review for the Mowbray Road West precinct was undertaken as part of the study. The review concludes that the current public transport supply meets demand. However, given the increase in unit developments in the Mowbray Road West precinct, Council will continue to monitor the need for public transport and lobby the NSW Government accordingly.

 

As per the July 2019 Council resolution, the road safety review of Kullah Parade was added to the study. The study recommends the removal of parking on significant bends to improve visibility and the installation of double centerlines around these bends to ensure that it is a low speed environment.

 

The recommendations from the study will be implemented subject to community consultation where necessary and approval of the Local Traffic Committee.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.         The report be received and noted;

 

2.         Subject to consultation with affected residents and approval of the Traffic Committee, Council to implement a raised median to restrict right turn from Elizabeth Parade into Centennial Avenue. The raised median is to be implemented to coincide with the upgrade of Mowbray Road/Centennial Avenue intersection. The raised median is to address the right turn crashes at the intersection;

 

3.         Council to continue to liaise with TfNSW to gain approval for a pedestrian refuge mid-block of Centennial Avenue;

 

4.         The existing speed limit of 50km/h to remain unchanged in local streets east of Centennial Avenue and Council to continue to monitor traffic speeds and volumes;

 

5.         Council to liaise with TfNSW to identify any opportunities that may allow the introduction of a right turn from Mowbray Road West into Pacific Highway;

 

6.         The current right turn restriction to remain at the Epping Road/Centennial Avenue intersection (north approach);

 

7.         Subject to approval of the Lane Cove Traffic Committee and consultation with affected residents, install speed humps in the locations outlined in AT-3;

 

8.         To address safety concerns associated with the corner cutting behaviour, a splitter island is proposed on the Kurri Street approach to the intersection shown in AT-4;

 

9.         Subject to Traffic Committee approval and community consultation, Council implement a raised platform on Parklands Avenue as per the concept design in AT-5;

 

10.       Council to monitor the demand for bus services in the Mowbray Road precinct and lobby the NSW Government for additional bus services if necessary; and

 

11.       Subject to Traffic Committee approval, implement ‘No Stopping’ zones and double centrelines around the bends of Kullah Parade and Gordon Crescent.

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Terescenko

Executive Manager - Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Lane Cove North Report

231 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑2View

The Study Area

1 Page

Available Electronically

AT‑3View

Speed Hump Location

1 Page

Available Electronically

AT‑4View

Splitter Island

1 Page

Available Electronically

AT‑5View

Raised Platform on Kurri Street

1 Page

Available Electronically

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 February 2020

New Park at 552 Mowbray Road Park - Results of Community Consutlation

 

 

Subject:          New Park at 552 Mowbray Road Park - Results of Community Consutlation    

Record No:    SU7675 - 4658/20

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Helen Haigh 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

At the Council meeting on 18 November 2019 a concept plan for the new pocket park at 552 Mowbray Road was endorsed for community consultation.  The consultation period for the concept plan on the proposed park closed on 24 January 2020 after a six (6) week public consultation period. The general sentiment of the community submissions was positive and in support of the concept plan and is therefore recommended for adoption by Council.

 

Background

 

552 Mowbray Road (697m2) was acquired by Council under a Voluntary Planning Agreement (VPA) to be developed as a pocket park to partially offset the loss of the Girraween Avenue Park, which was part of a land swap as part of Council’s overall strategy to create the new large Mindarie Park. The Mowbray Road site was rezoned as RE1 Public Recreation in November 2019. The house was demolished in September 2019 and the site is now ready for construction to commence.

 

Discussion

 

At the 18 November 2019 Council meeting, Council approved the concept plan for the pocket park for the purpose of community consultation. The concept plan was subsequently put on community consultation as per Council’s consultation policy.

 

The consultation period ran from 13 December 2019 to 24 January 2020. During the consultation period seven (7) submissions were received. Four (4) submissions included congratulating Council on the Concept Plan. Two (2) expressed concern about the BBQ smoke, smell and noise in regard to the proximity to the residential units, and five (5) submissions had suggestions:-

 

·    Installing a bicycle rack and rubbish bin;

·    Installing a solar powered USB charging station;

·    Space for a community garden area;

·    Different play equipment; and

·    Higher fence along the boundry with 550 Mowbray Road.

 

Of these suggestions the bike rack and rubbish bin have been incorporated into the design.  In the future, consideration will be given to a USB charging station. The feasibility of a community garden space will also be investigated, as a residents group will need to be established for it to be successful. The play equipment is not recommended to be changed as accessible elements are located in adherence with the inclusive playground guidelines. Council is working with the strata committee from 550 Mowbray in regard to height of the dividing fence height.

 

Conclusion

 

It is recommended that Council adopts the concept plan as final version (AT- 1) so that the construction process can commence.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

1.   Council received and note the report; and

2.   Council adopt the Concept Plan for the pocket park at 552 Mowbray Road and commence construction.

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Terescenko

Executive Manager - Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

New Park - 552 Mowbray Road

1 Page

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 February 2020

Amended Code of Meeting Practice

 

 

Subject:          Amended Code of Meeting Practice    

Record No:    SU837 - 5972/20

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Jessica Quilty 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The Code of Meeting Practice was adopted by Council at the Ordinary Council Meeting of 20 May 2019. This document was based on the Model Code of Meeting Practice issued by the Office of Local Government and prescribed by the Local Government (General) Regulation on 14 December 2018.  Some minor amendments are now recommended which consist of historical policies adopted by Lane Cove Council that should be included in the Code of Meeting Practice.

This report recommends that the Draft Code of Meeting Practice which has been developed with regard to the Model Code and Council policy, be adopted for the purpose of community consultation and that a further report addressing any submissions received and any proposed amendments to the draft Code, be received by Council following the consultation period.

 

Background

 

Council’s current Code of Meeting Practice was last reviewed in April 2012.  A new Model Code of Meeting Practice was prescribed by the Local Government (General) Regulation on 14 December 2018. 

 

The new Model Code sets out a number of mandatory provisions that Council must incorporate into its Code of Meeting Practice along with a range of other non-mandatory best practice provisions. 

 

Council at its meeting 20 May 2019 where it resolved that:-

 

The amended Draft Code of Meeting Practice be adopted subject to the following further amendments:-

1.   Amend clause 4.2 to read:

4.2       Public forums are to be chaired by the Chairperson of the meeting.

2.   Insert new clause 4.3:

4.3       Public Forums shall be limited to two (2) hours’ duration;

3.   Amend clause 4.4 (previously draft clause 4.3) to:

4.4      To speak at a public forum, a person wishing to address the council during a public forum must register their details with Council by 5:00pm on the day of the Council meeting at which the individual is speaking. This information includes:-

a.       Identification of the matter on which the person wishes to speak; and

b.       The speakers name and address; and

c.       Relevant contact information (email and phone number) to allow Council to follow up with speaker should this be required;

4.   Reorder and amend clauses 4.5  to 4.9 (previously draft clauses 4.4 to 4.8) as follows:-

4.5       Speakers at the Public Forum will be invited by the Chairperson, in order of registration, to address the Council.

4.6       Speakers who have not registered to speak at the public forum may be invited to address Council by the Chairperson after the registered speakers have addressed Council.

4.7       A person may speak on any number of items of business on the agenda of the council meeting or on any other topic.

4.8       A representative acting on behalf of others, including legal representatives and consultants, are not to be permitted to speak at a public forum unless they identify their status as a representative when applying to speak at the public forum.

4.9       Each speaker will be allowed a maximum of three (3) minutes to address the Council. This time is to be strictly enforced by the Chairperson.

5.   Amend clause 4.10 (previously draft clause 4.9) as follows:-

4.10     Speakers at the public forum are to register with the Council any visual or audio material to be presented to the Council at the public forum in support of their address within their timeframe allocated in 4.9, and to identify any equipment needs by 12 noon on the day of the council meeting at which the individual is speaking. The General Manager or their delegate may refuse to allow such material to be presented.

6.   Amend clause 4.13 and 4.14 (previously draft clauses 4.12 and 4.13) as follows to clarify that speakers’ questions cannot be answered during the forum:-

4.13     If a speaker at a public forum poses a question to the Council, Councillors or Council staff, the question is not required to be answered during the public forum.

4.14     The General Manager may, with the concurrence of the Chairperson, address the Council during a public forum to clarify an issue.

7.   Delete previous draft clause 4.14;

8.   Delete draft clauses 4.18; and

9.   Renumber all clauses accordingly and amend any references to clauses in Section 4 of the Code as required.

 

                       

Discussion

 

The current Code of Meeting Practice is consistent with the model code issued by the by the Office of Local Government and prescribed by the Local Government (General) Regulation.

 

A review of the code has been undertaken against Council’s previous adopted Code of Meeting Practice (2012) and from this it has been identified that Council should include specific Council policies that have been previously adopted in the following areas in addition to some minor changes:

 

 

1.   3.3 Page 7- Extraordinary Meetings

 

Additional sentence around the minimum time required to call an extraordinary meeting which states In no case shall notice of less than twenty-four (24) hours be given’. This insures there is a minimum notice period provided for Councillors to attend.

 

 

 

 

2.    3.11 Page 8 - Giving Notice of Business to be Considered at Council Meetings

Replace four (4) business days before the meeting is to be held with ‘midnight on the Tuesday preceding the meeting.’ This is consistent with previous policy and ensures a clear deadline. 

 

3.    4.1 and note Page 13 - Public Forum

 

Additional sentence regarding public forums at Extraordinary meetings which states, only on items of business listed on the agenda’. An Extraordinary Meeting can only deal with the matter stipulated when called because the business to be considered must be of great urgency and requires a decision before the next scheduled ordinary meeting of the council, it’s important that this item of business be the focus.

 

The inclusion of a Note The general order of business for an ordinary meeting of the council includes a public forum conducted during the meeting. This is to clarify that Council will hold a public forum during the meeting. The general order of business permits Council to hold a public forum during the meeting via suspension of standing orders. Standing orders are within the power of the meeting and can be amended or suspended depending on the requirements of business.

 

      5.19 Page 17 – Webcasting of Meetings

 

       Insertion of the word. Live to indicated that the webcast will occur in real time, not on                   delay.

 

 

4.   5.22 Page 17 - Webcasting of Meetings

 

Insert timeframe of four (4) years for the webcasting of Council meetings to be retained on Council’s website. This is in accordance with the general retention an disposal authority: local government records (GA39) and will coincide with each term of Council.

 

 

5.   8.4 Page 22 - Order of Business for Ordinary Council Meetings

 

8.4 be deleted as general practice is to conclude closed Committee of the whole around 7pm, there may however be extenuating circumstances to extend beyond 7pm.

 

 

6.   10.1 Page 24 - Rules of Debate

 

Additional sentence which states However, the mover of a motion may be allowed by the Chairperson to speak to the motion before calling for the motion to be seconded’. This is consistent with previous Council policy and contributing to meeting efficiency.

 

7.   10.24 & 10.25 Page 26 - Rules of Rebate

 

Replace five (5) minutes with three (3) minutes. This is consistent with previous Council policy and contributes to meeting efficiency.

 

 

 

 

8.   11.7 Page 28 - Voting

 

Include additional wording including defeated motions and amendments’. This is consistent with previous Council policy and ensures that defeated motions and amendments are recorded in the minutes.

 

9.   18.1 Page 44 - Time Limits on Council Meetings

Additional wording  unless upon a motion to which there is no dissent’ regarding the meeting extending past midnight. This is to ensure all Councilors can effectively participate in meetings.

 

Changes to the Code of Meeting Practice can be found in (AT-1) with additions highlighted in blue and deletions in strikethrough.

 

Community Consultation

 

The consultation is designed to ascertain the community’s views on the minor changes to the Code of Meeting Practice. Any comments received will be reviewed and evaluated to determine whether to incorporate any amendments or additional supplementary provisions.

 

Method

 

Level of Participation

Inform

Consult

 

Form of Participation

Open

Open

 

Target Audience

Lane Cove Community 

Lane Cove Community

 

Proposed Medium

Advertisement and

eNewsletter

 

Public Exhibition Website Exhibition

 

Indicative Timing

February to March    

 

Conclusion

 

The additional minor amendments to the Code of Meeting Practice are considered necessary in order to align the current code with previous adopted Council policies. Community consultation will be undertaken and any  submission received will be reported back to the April Council meeting.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

1.   Council adopt for the purpose of public exhibition, the Draft Code of Meeting Practice;

2.   Council undertake community consultation for a period of six (6) weeks as per the consultation strategy outlined in the report; and

3.   Following the exhibition period, the Draft Code of Meeting Practice, together with a report on any submissions received and any proposed amendments, be considered at the Council meeting to be held 20 April 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Draft Code of Meeting Practice

54 Pages

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 February 2020

Community Gift Card - Love Where You Shop - 12 Month Update

 

 

Subject:          Community Gift Card - Love Where You Shop - 12 Month Update    

Record No:    SU7220 - 7604/20

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):      David Stevens 

 

 

Executive Summary

                                                              

Council launched the Lane Cove Gift Card (Love Where You Shop) in May 2019 to coincide with Mother’s Day after commissioning Why Leave Town Promotions (WLT) to manufacture and deliver 1,000 cards. Currently, there are 75 participating stores 8 of which provide card loading capability including Council Offices. To date the total value of cards loaded is $16,353 with $6,084 being redeemed, December was the largest “load month” of the program at $4,773. Note, the stated figures do not include Drought Relief Funding provided to Gunnedah Shire Council(s) via the Lane Cove Gift Card.

 

Background

 

At the March 2019 Ordinary Meeting, Council resolved that a further report on this matter be presented no later than 12 months after the project commencement. During this time, monthly statistics and data have been collected to help Council and our partner WLT assess progress and outcomes. Marketing and advertising have been conducted digitally across multiple channels including Council’s website and Facebook page, In the Cove and the Village Observer (TVO) plus physically in the North Shore Times and TVO.

 

 

Discussion

 

Council promoted the Lane Cove Gift Card across important calendar events including Mother’s / Father’s Day, The Village Rotary Fair and Christmas in 2019.

 

From a retail engagement perspective, some points below are worth noting and should be integral to the Gift Card Strategy for 2020:-

 

1.    40% of the participating stores are in the food and beverage sector representing over 50% of redemptions with only 13% recording no redemptions;

2.    10% of the participating stores are in the Fashion and Homeware sector representing 22% of cards redeemed;

3.    25% of participating stores redeemed greater than $100;

4.    30% of participating stores did not have any redemptions;

5.    33% of the above stores are in the Hair and Beauty sector;

6.    No cards were redeemed at personal fitness and health retailers (with the exception of Lane Cove Aquatic and Leisure Centre);

7.    37% of cards purchased have not been redeemed;

8.    246 Lane Cove Gift cards have been loaded at an average of 27 per month; and

9.    195 redemption transactions have occurred at an average of 22 per month.

 

Card activation in the small number of fashion and homeware stores is encouraging in absolute terms, however the quantum of participating stores is limited by the number of fashion retailers who fall inside franchisee models, eg Baku, Gazman and Blue Illusion all of whom should be a focus for 2020. Looking ahead, and in recognition of the dollar value associated with cards not yet redeemed (63%), Mother’s Day and The Canopy Grand Opening in June represent ideal opportunities for Council to promote the Lane Cove Gift Card. Data collected in and around the Village Rotary Fair were largely disappointing despite a concerted awareness campaign that included discounts from many participating retailers and prizes offered by Council.

 

The strength of performance in the Food and Beverage sector is particularly relevant for The Canopy as it provides a clear and obvious opportunity to collaborate further with Council’s new park level tenants. The Canopy will be a community venue home to many programmed events, which individually and collectively will assist Council in its efforts to increase awareness of The Lane Cove Gift Card.

 

Council have sought feedback from WLT, the supplier of the Cards, who believe our program stacks up well with the many Regional Councils who have undertaken similar “local currency strategies”. In terms of retailer participation, WLT’s view is that Lane Cove’s program is a success with 75 local businesses involved.

 

 

May
19

Jun
19

Jul
19

Aug
19

Sep
19

Oct
19

Nov
19

Dec
19

Jan
20

Total

Number of Loaded Cards

16

15

26

42

23

18

23

77

6

246

Load Value

$1,150

$1,025

$520

$3,280

$2,275

$910

$1,760

$4,773

$660

$16,353

Number of Redemptions

7

9

7

11

16

29

43

25

48

195

Value of Redemptions

$219

$412

$193

$164

$613

$1,019

$1,301

$966

$1,197

$6,084

 

Conclusion

 

Council should continue to refine its marketing and awareness strategy for the Lane Cove Gift Card in 2020. Whilst the number of cards in circulation (ie participation) is trending higher, 63% of those cards have not been redeemed and it is this number that Council will seek to reduce. As such, the primary focus is changing “consumer behaviour” by more regularly (not just event driven) articulating the value and benefit to Lane Cove residents to shop local to drive new card purchases higher. “Love Where You Shop” and “Love Where You Live” will remain as core messaging externally, whilst internally Council shall set attainable targets for unredeemed cards.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.   Council note and receive the Report; and

 

2.   Council extend the Community Gift Card – Love Where You Shop campaign for a further 12 months, with a further report to be submitted in 12 months’ time on the performance of the program.

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 February 2020

Financial Assistance to Regional NSW Impacted By Drought Conditions

 

 

Subject:          Financial Assistance to Regional NSW Impacted By Drought Conditions    

Record No:    SU2765 - 7403/20

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):      David Stevens 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Further to Council’s decision in November 2019, Council successfully facilitated significant Drought Relief Funding to affected residents of the Gunnedah and Cobar Shire(s). Council worked closely with the respective recipient Councils, Gunnedah Lions Club and Why Leave Town Promotions (WLT – Lane Cove Gift Card Partner). In total, the Lane Cove Community raised $23,585.12 with special thanks to Jacky Barker from In the Cove ($10,674.34) and the Lane Cove Youth Orchestra ($3,853). In addition, Council contributed a further $5,000 ($2,500 to each Shire Council) for a grand total of $28,585.12. Overall, the program was a huge success and much needed funds were raised for affected communities and their families.

 

Background

 

At its meeting 18th November 2019 where it resolved that Council:-

 

1.   Agrees to support the communities of Gunnedah and Cobar LGA by asking residents to purchase either VISA/Mastercard debit cards, Lane Cove Gift Card or IGA gift cards and leave them at Council to provide to the respective Council for distribution via local charities to those in need in the Gunnedah and Cobar Local government areas;

 

2.   Advise the Mayors of Gunnedah and Cobar of what our community is planning and confirm and finalise any operational issues;

 

3.   Email to all the mayors of metropolitan councils a copy of the motion and ask that they also develop a similar strategy to assist regional NSW councils;

 

4.   Write to the President of Local Government NSW, Linda Scott, and advise her of what Lane Cove Council’s strategy is, and ask that she support the strategy in her next newsletter;

 

5.   Develop a marketing plan and official launch date to commence as soon as possible;

 

6.   The General Manager prepare a report for the February 2020 Council Meeting advising how many gifts were purchased by the community and any other correspondence that he may have received;

 

7.   Donate $5,000 to support the communities of Gunnedah and Cobar; and

 

8.   Advertise the proposed donation for a period of 2 weeks and subject to no objections being received Council make the donation. 

 

To ensure Lane Cove Gift Cards could be redeemed in Gunnedah, Council engaged WLT to activate all participating stores including the addition of Woolworths and Coles through whom many residents purchase their staple food and grocery items.

 

Discussion

 

Council was mindful of the need for drought relief funding to be distributed both fairly, and to those most immediately in need. In our Sister City of Gunnedah, their Lions Club was appointed project lead to ensure the right families were immediately supported. To this end, and as a consequence of the magnitude of funds raised, Council was able to meet the Lions’ Club request for 129 Lane Cove Gift Cards with the balance of 121 being held in trust by Gunnedah Council. The balance will be distributed via the 3 Rotary Clubs in Gunnedah, their Lions Club and the Rural Financial Counselling Service during 2020. Note, all Lane Cove Gift Cards loaded for Gunnedah were for $50.

 

After consulting with Cobar Council’s Grants Officer, Council assigned them with the administration and distribution duties to purchase and deliver IGA Gift Cards and VISA/Mastercard debit cards to more than 100 affected families. Council also approved the addition of Fuel Cards to the relief offering in recognition of many farming families being located up to 400km from the town of Cobar.

 

Conclusion

 

Gunnedah and Cobar Shire Councils are extremely grateful for the generous support provided by

Council and our community. Gunnedah received $15,000 whilst Cobar was gifted $13,585.12

providing more than 250 families with immediate support. The program was a great demonstration

of the Lane Cove Community’s generosity and the ability for Local Councils to work together.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receive and note the report.

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Cobar Shire Council - Letter of Thanks

1 Page

 

AT‑2View

Gunnedah Shire Council - Letter of Thanks

1 Page

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 February 2020

Hunters Hill, Lane Cove, Parramatta, Ryde, Bushfire Risk Management Committee - Bush Fire Risk Management Plan - 5 Year Plan -  Adoption

 

 

Subject:          Hunters Hill, Lane Cove, Parramatta, Ryde, Bushfire Risk Management Committee - Bush Fire Risk Management Plan - 5 Year Plan -  Adoption    

Record No:    SU4906 - 7281/20

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Jeff  Culleton 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

At the Ordinary Council meeting of 18 November 2019, the Hunters Hill, Lane Cove, Parramatta, Ryde, Bushfire Management Committee (BFMC) – Bushfire Risk Management Plan (BFRMP) 2019/24 was endorsed for community consultation as per the requirements of the NSW Bushfire Coordinating Committee (BFCC). The consultation period for the plan closed on 30 December 2019 after a forty-two (42) day public consultation period.

 

A total of three (3) submissions were received for the Lane Cove Local Government Area (LGA). The submissions contained comments to consider for the review of assets to be included in the plan. These comments will be reviewed by the BFMC in conjunction with Council and the NSW BCC for a determination of recommendations before final approval and endorsement of the plan.

 

Background

 

The current BFRMP was adopted by Council in 2009. Under the Rural Fires Act 1997 this plan must be reviewed and updated within each successive five-year period following the constitution of the BFMC.

 

Discussion

 

Each council will be undertaking its own community consultation in relation to this plan. Subsequently each council’s submissions and relevant responses will be discussed with the BFMC and BFCC and then any relevant amendments to the plan will occur.

 

The consultation period for Lane Cove Council ran from 19 November 2019 to 30 December 2019.

 

During the consultation period three (3) submissions were received for the Lane Cove LGA. Comments from the three (3) submissions were in relation to:-

 

·         Include Greenwich public school as a high-risk bushfire asset;

·         Include various assets surrounding the bushland reserves at Gore Cove reserve, Gore Creek reserve, Manns Point and Shell Park as high-risk bushfire assets;

·         Include Viva Energy’s Gore Bay Terminal as a high-risk bushfire asset;

·         Amend the street name Valley View Road to Valley View Crescent; and

·         Adopt actions to deal with bushfire risk in Lane Cove Bushland Park, Crowther Ave, Ronald Ave and Cogan Place.

 

Conclusion

 

The above items will be submitted to the BFMC and BFCC for consideration to be included in the BFRMP. Once the BFCC has reviewed and considered all comments from the other member councils, the final BFRMP will be ready for adoption. It is recommended that Council delegates the power to finalise the BFRMP to the General Manager.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.   The report be received and noted; and

 

2.   Council delegates authority to the General Manager to finalise the BFRMP

 

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Terescenko

Executive Manager - Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 February 2020

January 2020 Traffic Committee Meeting

 

 

Subject:          January 2020 Traffic Committee Meeting    

Record No:    SU1326 - 7612/20

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Hassaan Zafar 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The Lane Cove Traffic Committee Meeting was held on Tuesday, 21 January 2020. The Agenda is included as AT-1. The Traffic Committee recommendations are shown in the Minutes of the Meeting, included as AT-2.

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council adopts the recommendations of the Lane Cove Traffic Committee Meeting held on Tuesday, 21 January 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Terescenko

Executive Manager - Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Agenda - Traffic Committee - January 2020

10 Pages

 

AT‑2View

Minutes - Traffic Committee - January 2020

11 Pages

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 February 2020

2nd Quarter Review for 2019 - 2020 Budget

 

 

Subject:          2nd Quarter Review for 2019 - 2020 Budget    

Record No:    SU757 - 7373/20

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Jessica Quilty 

 

 

Executive Summary

The Second Quarter 2019 - 2020 Budget Review involves a variety of variations in both income and expenditure. It is recommended that the Budget be varied in terms of the report.

 

Background

 

Council is required to prepare a Budget Review Statement each quarter, in accordance with Clause 203 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005. The purpose of these reviews is to ensure that the impacts of financial variations are reflected in the forecast of Council’s global budgetary position to 30 June 2020, and the adopted Budget adjusted accordingly.

 

Discussion

Following this quarter’s budget review, Council’s Operating Surplus was increased by $23,000. A summary of Council’s revised Budget for 2019 - 2020 and a summary of budget movements have been included in this report:-

 

 

Original Budget

(000’s)

1st Quarter Adjustments

(000’s)

2nd Quarter Adjustments

(000’s)

Revised Budget

(000’s)

Expenditure - Operating

$46,241

$214

$185

$46,640

Income - Operating

$61,467

$1,099

$208

$62,774

Surplus/ (Deficit)

$15,226

$885

$23

 $16,134

Surplus/(Deficit) before

Capital Grants/Contributions

$470

($98)

$23

$395

 

Summary of Budget Movements

 

Operational Expenses

-     $185K Increase in Materials and Contracts which is made up of:

$83K Increase in Strata Levies for Little Street Strata Levies not included in original budget

$67K Increased for a grant received for Bushland Park

$35K Minor Adjustments

 

Operational Income

-     $133K Increase in Rates and Annual Charges which relates to supplementary rates from the completion of new development.

 

-     $75K Increase in Operating Grants & Contributions which made up of:

$67K for the grant received at Bushland Park

$8k Minor Adjustments

 

Capital Income

-     $100K Increase in Capital Grants and Contributions which relates to

$95K for compensation received from RMS for restoration of Turrumburra Park, trees and playground

$5K Minor Adjustments

 

Capital Expenditure

-     $634K Increase Capital Expenditure which is made up of:

$496K Projects being rolled over from previous year to be funded from the Sustainability Fund:

§ $360K LED Streetlighting program      

§ $9K Bushland Park Stormwater

§ $127K Sustainable Council Buildings

$95K for construction of Turrumburra Dog Park & Finlayson Street Playground

$43K Minor Adjustments

 

Conclusion

The following statement is made in accordance with Clause 203(2) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005.

It is my opinion that the quarterly Budget Review Statement for Lane Cove Council for the quarter ended 31 December 2019 indicates that Council's projected financial position will be satisfactory at year end 30 June 2020, having regard to the projected estimates of income and expenditure and the original budgeted income and expenditure.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the 2019 -2020 Budget be varied as follows:-

 

 

Original Budget

(000’s)

1st Quarter Adjustments

(000’s)

2nd Quarter Adjustments

(000’s)

Revised Budget

(000’s)

Expenditure - Operating

$46,241

$214

$185

$46,640

Income - Operating

$61,467

$1,099

$208

$62,774

Surplus/ (Deficit)

$15,226

$885

$23

 $16,134

Surplus/(Deficit) before

Capital Grants/Contributions

$470

($98)

$23

$395

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jessica Quilty

Acting Executive Manager

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Budget Review for the Quarter Ended 31 December 2019

6 Pages

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 February 2020

Living Labs

 

 

Subject:          Living Labs     

Record No:    SU5032 - 4283/20

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Helen Haigh 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council has been approached by Western Sydney University about the Which Plant Where (WPW) – Living Labs program in 2019. The WPW program is a five-year research program that will investigate how well current landscaping species will cope under the more extreme climates that Australia’s cities will face and investigate opportunities for new species and varieties for the urban context.

 

A site at Blackman Park has been identified as being suitable for the study regarding size and location. Funding for the project through the Sustainability Levy. Monitoring will be carried out over a 5–10 year period with works commencing in June 2020.  Council’s participation in the Living Labs research will be directly addressing the objectives in the Community Strategic Plan 2035. It is therefore recommended that Council proceeds with the program.

 

Background

 

This is a collaborative project between Horticulture Innovation Australia, Macquarie University, Western Sydney University, NSW Office of Environment and Heritage and 202020Vision that aims to facilitate sustainable green cities by developing urban green spaces across Australia.

The WPW Living Labs will form a network of urban planting sites throughout Australia to monitor plant performance across a wide range of environmental conditions. Living labs will help identify what sorts of plant species will thrive in our future cities, as well as measure the co-benefits they provide to urban populations, such as attracting biodiversity.

A living lab allows researchers, industry, government, and communities to collaborate around a dedicated space. The WPW Living Labs will measure how selected species of trees and shrubs perform in real-world settings over time in different states across Australia.

The Living Labs is a standardised set of tree and shrub plantings suitable for significant urban areas throughout Australia that will:-

 

1.   Test the performance of species with different morphologies and growth forms under a wide range of environmental conditions; and

 

2.   evaluate the co-benefits of urban greening (e.g. heat mitigation, enhanced biodiversity) by examining the role of vegetation structure and diversity.

 

Discussion

 

Council’s participation in the Living Labs research will directly address objectives in the Community Strategic Plan 2035 and Sustainability Action Plan. Participation also aligns with Council’s recent declaration in recognition of a Climate Emergency.

 

Our Natural Environment section in the Community Strategic Plan 2035 addresses a key issue as climate change: “As the world community becomes more aware and concerned about climate change and environmental degradation, together with the implications of our reliance on finite resources, there is a clear call to act locally. Council is continually monitoring and exploring new ways that the community’s ecological footprint can be reduced and promoted to our community, such as management of greenhouse gas emissions, energy and water consumption.

 

·    Objectives for 14: Urban Forest are to ensure the tree canopy cover across the Lane Cove area is maintained and increased on both public and private land; and to maintain a healthy proliferation of flora within our built environment.

·    Objectives for 13: Environmental Protection includes to demonstrate sound environmental management, so the community can play a role in addressing climate change.

 

The Environment themed goals from Council’s Sustainability Action Plan that are addressed; include;-

·    Goal 1: Action 1.11: Plan wildlife corridors.

·    Goal 4: Action 4.2: Increase understanding of climate risk and implement adaption options

 

A site at Blackman Park has been identified; which is located along the Lane Cove River (AT -1). Some of the native species selected are not indigenous to Lane Cove but do not have the potential to become invasive. They will provide habitat for local wildlife and provide the ‘missing link’ in a vegetation corridor from Ventemans Reach and Lovetts Reserve.

 

The Bushland Management Advisory Committee have been consulted and have raised issues with regards to the species chosen for this project. However, even though some of the species are not indigenous to Lane Cove it is considered that there are benefits from taking part in this program that strongly align with Council’s Community Strategic Plan and the sentiments of the recently declared Climate Emergency.

 

Conclusion       

 

Council’s contribution to the project will consist of; site location, purchasing plants and maintenance of the plantings. Council’s contribution will be funded from the Sustainability Levy and if required the existing operational Blackman Park bush regeneration and parks budgets.

 

Living Labs research will include monitoring plant performance of the planting sites, provision of tailored, site-specific and network-level information relating to growth, survival and co-benefits during the project.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That: -

 

1.   Council receive and note this report;

 

2.   Council endorse the Living Labs research study plot; and

 

3.   Council request an annual report on the findings of the study from the University of Western Sydney

 

 

Martin Terescenko

Executive Manager - Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Living Labs - documentation for construction

3 Pages

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 February 2020

The 2nd Quarter Review of the 2019 - 2020 Delivery Program and Operational Plan

 

 

Subject:          The 2nd Quarter Review of the 2019 - 2020 Delivery Program and Operational Plan    

Record No:    SU238 - 7775/20

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Simon Cole 

 

 

Executive Summary

Council adopted the 2019 - 20 Delivery Program and Operational Plan (DPOP) on 17 June 2019.   The DPOP provides performance measures against progress in each quarter of the current financial year towards the goals and objectives of Council’s Community Strategic Plan, “Liveable Lane Cove: 2035”.   This report presents the 2nd Quarter Review of the 2019 – 2020 DPOP and highlights some key projects identified this quarter.   It is recommended that the report be received and noted.

 

Discussion

The 2nd Quarter Review of the 2018-19 Delivery Program and Operational Plan is at AT-1

 

Noteworthy achievements for the quarter include:-

 

·    The new pool structure and water testing was completed;

 

·    Council's Local Strategic Planning Statement was exhibited from 5 September to 17 October 2019 and endorsed by Council at the Extraordinary Meeting held on 4 February 2020; 

 

·    The opening of The Canopy car park introduced an additional 400 car spaces in the Lane Cove village;

 

·    Six (6) electric vehicle charging bays were installed in The Canopy car park and five (5) in the Market Square car park;

 

·    A preliminary design for the proposed St Leonards Plaza was prepared and is currently awaiting Sydney Trains and TfNSW approval;

 

·    Forty (40) sustainability levy projects are underway, including the HarbourCare Program which has had eighty-five (85) participants collecting 1,897kgs of litter.  Additionally, almost 2,000 trees have been uploaded into a new online mapping tool;

 

·    The Lane Cove Community Nursery provided 2,345 plants for distribution through Council programs, as well as at Sustainability Lane at the Rotary Fair;

 

·    ShoreLink's new Mobile Makerspace - featuring robotics and STEAM educational kits was launched at Lane Cove Library; and

 

·    A Weeds Management Officer was appointed to Council to implement biosecurity programs in accordance with Council obligations under Biosecurity legislation.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the 2nd Quarter Review of the 2019 – 20  Delivery Program and Operational Plan be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

Jessica Quilty

Acting Executive Manager

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Delivery Program and Operational Plan - 2nd Quarterly Review January 2020

118 Pages

Available Electronically

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 17 February 2020

Council Snapshot January 2020

 

 

Subject:          Council Snapshot January 2020    

Record No:    SU220 - 7312/20

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):      Craig Wrightson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Attached for the information of Councillors is a review of Council’s recent activities. This report provides a summary of the operations of each Division for January 2020.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Snapshot January 2020

49 Pages