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Agenda

Ordinary Council Meeting

23 July 2018

The meeting commences at 6.30pm. If members of the public are

not interested in any business recommended to be considered in

Closed Session or there is no such business, Council will ordinarily

  commence consideration of all other business at 7pm.

 

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Notice of Meeting

 

Dear Councillors

 

Notice is given of the Ordinary Council Meeting, to be held in the Council Chambers, 48 Longueville Road Lane Cove on Monday 23 July 2018 commencing at 6.30pm. The business to be transacted at the meeting is included in this business paper.

 

Craig - GMYours faithfully

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

 

Council Meeting Procedures

 

The Council meeting is chaired by the Mayor, Councillor Pam Palmer. Councillors are entitled to one vote on a matter. If votes are equal, the Chairperson has a second or casting vote. When a majority of Councillors vote in favour of a Motion it becomes a decision of the Council. Minutes of Council and Committee meetings are published on Council’s website www.lanecove.nsw.gov.au by 5pm on the Thursday following the meeting.

 

The Meeting is conducted in accordance with Council's Code of Meeting Practice. The order of business is listed in the Agenda on the next page. That order will be followed unless Council resolves to modify the order at the meeting. This may occur for example where the members of the public in attendance are interested in specific items on the agenda.

 

Members of the public may address the Council Meeting on any issue for a maximum of 3 minutes during the public forum which is held at the beginning of the meeting. All persons addressing the Meeting must speak to the Chair. Speakers and Councillors will not enter into general debate or ask questions.

 

If you do not understand any part of the information given above; require assistance to participate in the meeting due to a disability; or wish to obtain information in relation to Council, please contact Council’s Executive Manager – Corporate Services on 99113550.

 

Please note meetings held in the Council Chambers are recorded on tape for the purposes of verifying the accuracy of minutes and the tapes are not disclosed to any third party under the Government Information (Public Access)  Act 2009, except as allowed under section 18(1) or section 19(1) of the PPIP Act, or where Council is compelled to do so by court order, warrant or subpoena or by any other legislation.

 

 

 


Ordinary Council 23 July 2018

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

APOLOGIES

 

OPENING OF MEETING WITH PRAYER

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT TO COUNTRY

 

NOTICE OF WEBCASTING OF MEETING

 

MATTERS RECOMMENDED BY THE GENERAL MANAGER TO BE CONSIDERED IN CLOSED COMMITTEE

 

Confidential Items

 

1.      Potential Acquisition of Land

It is recommended that the Council close so much of the meeting to the public as provided for under Section 10A(2) (c) of the Local Government Act, 1993, on the grounds that the report contains information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business; it further being considered that discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to public interest by reason of the foregoing and The report identifies the site for possible aquisition and likely costs.. 

 

public forum

 

Members of the public may address the Council Meeting on any issue for 3 minutes.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

 

2.      ORDINARY COUNCIL MEETING - 18 JUNE 2018

 

Orders Of The Day

 

Notices of Motion

 

3.      Notice of Motion - Community Consultation concerning the St. Leonards Crows Nest Priority Precinct as a whole

 

Officer Reports for Determination

 

4.      NSW Public Library Funding

 

5.      Voluntary Planning Agreement -  56-60 Burns Bay Road, Lane Cove

 

6.      Financial Assistance Grants 2018-2019

 

7.      Local Government Conference NSW 2018

 

8.      Sydney Planning Summit

 

Officer Reports for Information

 

9.      Changes to the Management of Crown Reserves

 

10.    Local Government Superannuation Scheme

 

11.    Council Snapshot  

 

 

 

 

                    


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 23 July 2018

Notice of Motion - Community Consultation concerning the St. Leonards Crows Nest Priority Precinct as a whole

 

 

Subject:          Notice of Motion - Community Consultation concerning the St. Leonards Crows Nest Priority Precinct as a whole    

Record No:     SU6864 - 43618/18

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):       Councillor Francis Vissel 

 

 

 

Background

The Greenwich Community Association has requested the opportunity for the community to engage with Council officers and Councillors in advance of release of the LUIIP.

The plans for the precinct, including the area in the St Leonards South Master Plan, will impact residents in East Ward directly and it is appropriate that the community be offered the opportunity to share with Council officers and Councillors their views around the appropriate development of the whole precinct, not just the Lane Cove portion.  This will better inform Council’s response to the LUIIP when it is released.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That in order to inform Council’s response to the Department of Planning in respect of the draft LUIIP for the St Leonards Crows Nest Planned Precinct, Council to commence a process of ongoing consultation with the community of East Ward to seek input from the community as to the future development of the St Leonards Crows Nest Planned Precinct.  This consultation is to be in addition to the two community consultation sessions after release of the LUIIP as foreshadowed in the Council resolution of 19 March 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor Francis Vissel

Councillor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

   


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 23 July 2018

NSW Public Library Funding

 

 

Subject:          NSW Public Library Funding    

Record No:     SU2122 - 41030/18

Division:         Human Services Division

Author(s):       Jennifer Bice 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council receives an annual subsidy payment from the State Government that will be reduced in 2018/19 due to the 2018-19 NSW budget cutting public library funding. Metropolitan councils have also been excluded from applying for library infrastructure grants as all library infrastructure grants have been transferred to the Regional Cultural Fund.

 

NSW public libraries receive the lowest per-capita funding from their State Government compared to all other states in Australia. The percentage of State funding has been falling since the 1980s since there has been no indexing to population growth or consumer price index (CPI).

 

Local Government NSW (LGNSW) and the NSW Public Library Association (NSWPLA) are seeking Council’s support for a statewide advocacy campaign. It is recommended Council support the campaign.

 

Background

 

In 2015/16, State funding for public libraries covered only 7.5% of the total costs of operating the 368 libraries across NSW. Many councils are struggling to fund and support local libraries and this is impacting on services, programs and opening hours.

 

The 2018-19 NSW state budget delivered just $23.528M for public libraries, $5.275M less that the 2017-18 funding level. There has been 5% cut to recurrent funding and the transfer of infrastructure funding to the Regional Cultural Fund excludes metropolitan councils from applying for library infrastructure/development grants. Lane Cove’s subsidy will be less in 2018-19 compared to the previous year.

 

The Local Government NSW (LGNSW) and the NSW Public Libraries Association (NSWPLA) have requested support from councils across NSW for their advocacy to the State Government for additional funds for public libraries.

 

Discussion

 

Whilst Council receives funds from State Government, the percentage of library funding has gradually decreased. In 2015/16, State funding for Public Libraries covered only 7.5% of the total costs of operating the 368 libraries across NSW. The level of State Government funding for NSW public libraries has reached crisis point.  This is an historic issue that has been ignored by successive NSW governments.  Some key issues include:-

 

·    NSW public libraries receive the lowest per-capita funding from their State Government compared to all other states in Australia;

·    NSW councils are currently paying 92.5% of the costs to operate public libraries, up from 77% in 1980;

·    In 2015-16, NSW State Government funding for public libraries was only $26.5M compared to a contribution of $341.1M from Local Government. NSW councils are paying 12 times more than the State Government to provide library services to their communities.

·    The total funding available through the NSW Public Library Funding Strategy is not indexed to population growth or consumer price index (CPI), thereby contributing to the ongoing attrition of State Government funding;

·    The 2018-19 State Budget delivered a 5% cut to recurrent funding and cut access to all infrastructure funding for metropolitan areas;

·    Physical and virtual visitation, and participation in library programs continue to increase year on year;

·    Libraries play a major part in supporting the achievement of government literacy targets; and

·    Libraries provide collections, programs and spaces for marginalised groups including older people, refugee and multicultural communities, and people who are digitally disadvantaged.

 

In 2011, the NSW State Government made a pre-election commitment to comprehensively review the level and allocation of funding for NSW public libraries. The Library Council of NSW worked with the NSW Public Libraries Associations and the State Library of NSW to develop an evidence-based submission. The resulting submission Reforming Public Library Funding was presented to the State Government in October 2012 - the recommendations were ignored and the funding model was neither reviewed nor improved.

 

In 2016, the then Minister for the Arts, the Hon. Troy Grant, undertook to review the matter of State Government funding for NSW libraries at the conclusion of the Fit For the Future program. It can be reasonably assumed that Fit For the Future has concluded, yet there has been no review of library funding nor any mention of libraries in the Government’s pre-election undertakings. At the 2016 LGNSW Conference, the Premier Mike Baird also committed to reviewing library funding.

 

The NSW Public Libraries Association has joined forces with Local Government NSW to establish a library funding advocacy initiative in the lead up to the 2019 NSW State election. The Renew Our Libraries strategy will be rolled out over the next 8 months to persuade the Government that its network of 368 public libraries has reached a funding flashpoint that, without significantly increased and sustainable funding, is at risk of imminent service reduction. The success of this approach relies heavily on the support of NSW councils, their libraries and their communities.

 

It should be noted that the following motion (submitted by the Blue Mountains City Council) was unanimously endorsed at the Local Government NSW 2017 Conference:

 

That Local Government NSW works with the NSW Public Libraries Association (NSWPLA) to develop a strategic partnership to:

 

a)   increase public awareness of the multiple roles that Local Government Public Libraries play in supporting the educational, social, cultural and economic outcomes in local communities; and

 

b)   advocate, in the lead up to the March 2019 State election, for improved State Government funding for Local Government Public Libraries in NSW to enable public libraries to meet the growing needs of our local communities.

 

This is not a party-political issue as every government since 1980 has failed to improve the funding situation. Nevertheless, it is worth noting that the NSW Opposition released its Library Funding Policy on 26 March 2018 with an undertaking to increase overall funding to all suburban and regional NSW public libraries by $50 million in the first term of government. This is a very significant pledge insofar as it is the first policy from any political party in recent history that undertakes to provide a significant and specified increase in state funding for public libraries.

NSW public libraries are governed by the Library Act 1939, a legislative instrument that was initially introduced to ensure the provision and ongoing sustainability of libraries through State Government and Local Government collaboration, and providing up to 50% of the funding required to establish and operate libraries. Since then local government has increasingly carried the funding burden with the situation deteriorating significantly since the 1980s. As a result, there are examples of attrition in library staffing, opening hours, collections, services and programs in a number of councils across the state.

 

Disappointingly, the 2018-19 NSW state budget delivered a 5% cut to current library funding and cut access to all infrastructure funding for metropolitan areas. The State Government has ignored the recommendation of its own panel, the Library Council of NSW which, in consultation with the State Library of NSW and the NSW Public Libraries Consultative Committee, recommended an increase in public library funding to $30M in 2018-19.

 

The public library grant funding component, which has been a budget inclusion for many years, has been scrapped entirely. This component financed a competitive grant project which has part-funded countless library infrastructure and service projects over many years. Please note that Lane Cove Council received an $180,000 Library Development Grant in 2008/09 that contributed to the fit-out of the Lane Cove Library Extension.

 

It is recommended that Council support urgent action from LGNSW and NSWPLA, to reverse the ongoing deterioration of state funding for public libraries to ensure that local councils will not be forced to continue meeting the funding.

 

In the week commencing 30 July, LGNSW & NSWPLA will be launching Renew Our Libraries. This exciting advocacy initiative brings together councils, public libraries and their supporters into a grassroots effort to demand action and funding commitments from all political parties in the lead up to the 2019 NSW State Election.

 

Conclusion

 

The 2018-19 NSW state budget cut public library funding by 5% and excluded metropolitan councils from applying for library infrastructure grants. Lane Cove’s library subsidy will be less in 2018-19 compared to the previous year.

 

LGNSW and NSWPLA have requested support from councils across NSW for their advocacy to the State Government for additional funds for public libraries. In the week commencing 30 July, LGNSW & NSWPLA will be launching Renew Our Libraries. It is recommended that Council support this statewide campaign.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

 

1.      Endorse the NSW Public Libraries Association and Local Government NSW library funding advocacy initiative, Renew Our Libraries;

 

2.      Make representation to the local State Member, the Hon, Anthony Roberts MP, in relation to the need for additional funding from the NSW State Government for the provision of public library services;

 

 

3.      Write to the Hon. Don Harwin, Minister for the Arts and the Hon. Walt Secord, Shadow Minister for the Arts, calling for bi-partisan support for the provision of a significant increase in state funding for NSW public libraries, supported by a sustainable future funding model;

 

4.      Endorse the distribution of the NSW Public Libraries Association and Local Government NSW library funding advocacy initiative information in Lane Cove libraries, as well as involvement in actions arising from the initiative; and

 

5.      Advise the NSW Public Libraries Association and Local Government NSW that Council has endorsed the library funding advocacy initiative.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jennifer Bice

Acting Executive Manager - Human Services

Human Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Renew Our Libraries - Flyer

 

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 23 July 2018

Voluntary Planning Agreement -  56-60 Burns Bay Road, Lane Cove

 

 

Subject:          Voluntary Planning Agreement -  56-60 Burns Bay Road, Lane Cove     

Record No:     SU5266 - 43537/18

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):       Jessica Quilty; David Stevens; Craig Wrightson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report outlines a proposed Voluntary planning Agreement (VPA) with the developer, Sun Property Pty Ltd, of the property 56-60 Burns Bay Road, Lane Cove. The VPA would incorporate Council Land (approx 18%) into the development which comprises of commercial (mini-major retail space and specialty retail), residential in return for constructing community space including car parking, within the development. The report recommends that the proposed VPA be endorsed and placed on public exhibition for 28 days when the Development Application is advertised.

 

Background

 

Sun Property Pty Ltd (the developer) purchased 56- 60 Burns Bay Road Lane Cove also known as ‘the Coles site’ in November 2017. The land is currently zoned B2 Local Centre which permits shop top housing with an FSR 2.5:1.

 

As a result of the acquisition, the developer has explored the redevelopment potential which includes utilising Council’s land (830sqm less easements for public access) at the rear of the site which is currently a structured car park ‘the Coles Car Park’. Council’s land is zoned the same as the developer’s site and is classified as Operational Land under the Local Government Act, which allows Council to dispose of the land. The ‘Coles Car park’ is currently leased from Council which will be surrendered as part of Coles move to the Rosenthal Project.

 

The proposed scheme would be compliant with Council’s LEP controls by comprising a mixed-use development, containing specialty retail uses, residential apartments and a community space.

 

The developer is proposing to enter into a Voluntary Planning Agreement to construct and dedicate the community space (approximately 1085 sqm) and parking within the development in exchange for Council’s land. An indicative scheme will be distributed to Councillors separately prior to the meeting.

Subdivision 2, Division 6 of Part 4 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 sets out the system of planning agreements in NSW. Section 7.4 (1) A planning agreement is a voluntary agreement or other arrangement under this Division between a planning authority (or 2 or more planning authorities) and a person (the developer).... (c)  who has entered into an agreement ... under which the developer is required to dedicate land free of cost, pay a monetary contribution, or provide any other material public benefit, or any combination of them, to be used for or applied towards a public purpose.”

 

A public purpose is defined in Section 7.4 (2) and includes (without limitation) any of the following:

 

a)   “the provision of (or the recoupment of the cost of providing) public amenities or public services;

b)    the provision of (or the recoupment of the cost of providing) affordable housing;

c)   (the provision of (or the recoupment of the cost of providing) transport or other infrastructure relating to land;

d)   the funding of recurrent expenditure relating to the provision of public amenities or public services, affordable housing or transport or other infrastructure;

e)   the monitoring of the planning impacts of development; and

f)    the conservation or enhancement of the natural environment.”

 

Discussion

 

HillPDA on behalf of the developer, has made an offer to Council which values Council’s land at $2600 per sqm of GFA. The land itself is significantly compromised in terms of individual development potential as it lacks frontage to Burns Bay Road for a commercial use, and its small size and shallow depth means with building setbacks, a residential scheme is not viable. For this reason the incorporation into ‘the Coles’ site is the most logical redevelopment opportunity. It should be noted Council is exempt from having to sell the land by tender by virtue of s55(3) (d) a contract for the purchase or sale by a council of land.

 

To assist Council in determining if the value is appropriate for the proposal, Savills were engaged to undertake an assessment and to provide advice to Council.

 

Savills have assessed the residual land of the subject site for a hypothetical, mixed use, compliant development scheme and have derived a rate of $3000 / sqm of GFA, a 15% variation. The Valuers have been requested to confer to reach an agreed rate. As a bench mark, the original rate for VPA’s in St Leonards was $2600 per sqm of GFA. As lodgement of the Development Application is imminent and it is a requirement for the VPA to be advertised in conjunction with the Development Application notification, it is proposed to delegate authority to the General Manager to agree on the rate within the range of $2600-$3000 per sqm of GFA once the further advice of the Valuers is provided.

 

In the Development Application the total GFA utlised over the Council land is 1,204sqm (The final number to be adjusted based on actual Development Application. There are several easements over the Council site for public access which will result in an adjustment to the final contribution.

Council has applied a consistent formula in the St Leonard’s Precinct for VPA’s, and it is proposed to use it in respect of this VPA, being.

 

·    $/Rate x GFA = $2600 x 1204 =  $3.1M or $3000 x 1204 = $3.6M VPA contribution

Under the VPA the developer would be responsible for construction of the community space building shell, with the cost being offset by the VPA contribution from incorporating Council’s land. Actual construction costs will be determined by utilising a Quantity Surveyor.

 

The Development Application will be of a scale that the LPP will be the consent authority for the development. However, prior to the LPP’s consideration of the matter, Council will need to determine whether or not to accept the incorporation of Council’s land in the VPA in exchange for a community space following the consultation.

 

Community Consultation

 

Statement of Intent

 

The consultation is designed to permit public submissions on the proposed VPA for the redevelopment of 56-60 Burns Bay Road, Lane Cove . Any comments received will be reviewed and evaluated as part of any determination as to whether or not to accept the benefits proposed in the VPA.

Method

 

Level of Participation

Inform

Consult

Form of Participation

Open

Targeted

Target Audience

Lane Cove Community and community groups

Properties in the vicinity.

Local community associations.

Proposed Medium

Advertisement and

eNewsletter. Public Exhibition,

Website Exhibition and Online Survey

 

Notification Letters

Indicative Timing

In conjunction with the Development Application

In conjunction with the Development Application

 

Conclusion

 

The proposed VPA by incorporating Council’s land provides greater benefits to the community through a good planning outcome and the provision of additional Community space in the heart of the Lane Cove Precinct.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.   The report be received and noted;

 

2.   Council give notice of its intention to enter into a Voluntary Planning Agreement as outlined in the report with the developer of the subject site in accordance with the consultation strategy outlined in the report in conjunction with the Development Application;

 

3.   Council delegate authority to the General Manager to agree on the rate within the range of $2600-$3000 per sqm of GFA prior to giving notice of the intention to enter into a Voluntary Planning Agreement; and

 

4.   Following the community consultation, a further report be submitted to Council for determination.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 23 July 2018

Financial Assistance Grants 2018-2019

 

 

Subject:          Financial Assistance Grants 2018-2019    

Record No:     SU5300 - 42836/18

Division:         Human Services Division

Author(s):       Carol Sinclair 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report discusses the submissions received following the Public Exhibition of the recommended grants as adopted by Council on 21 May, 2018. It also discusses the applications from Multiple Sclerosis Limited and The Shepherd Centre for the Financial Assistance Grants Program 2018/2019 for which Council requested additional information .

 

Background

 

Council at its Meeting of 21 May 2018, resolved in part to give Public Notice of the proposed Financial Assistance Grants to Community Groups, and subject to no objections being received, grant the funds to the recommended groups.

 

Council also requested further information in relation to the applications made by Multiple Sclerosis Limited and The Shepherd Centre.

 

Discussion

 

Submissions received from the Public Exhibition

 

Community Consultation was undertaken from 1 June 2018 to 29 June 2018 as per the consultation strategy outlined in the previous report. It included:-

·    Static public exhibitions at the Civic Centre and Library;

·    An email to over 6,300 registered members of the community interested Council consultations;

·    A website exhibition; and

·    Public Notice in the North Shore Times

 

Council received three submissions from individuals, the feedback is summarised as follows:-

 

#

Comment

Council Response

1.i

Objects to the randomness of the size of grants, specifically the $20,000 going to the North Shore Rowing Club and any money going to the ANZAC ceremony

The resident was informed that the size of the grants are reflective of the amount of funding asked for. 

 

Council will continue to organise an ANZAC Ceremony to recognise the losses and sacrifices made by the men, women and families who protected and made possible our way of life.

 

1.ii

The Lane Cove Historical Society receives just $1,400 annually and then has to accept funds for its annual History Prize from developers.

The resident was also informed that the Lane Cove Historical Society applied for and received $1,400 for shelving units for the ‘Carisbrook Collection’ and that the Financial Assistance Grants funding is one off and not an annual funding program.

 

The History Prize is the Lane Cove Historical Society’s own project and as such they are responsible for the prizes. 

 

Council provides ongoing support to the Lane Cove Historical Society in the form of ongoing off-site storage costs, electricity and water charges, concessional room hire rates and use of the community photocopier.

 

2.i

Questioned why North Shore Rowing Club received $20,000 – it seemed high in relation to other clubs

The resident was informed that the size of the grant often reflects the amount the applicants ask for.  For example the North Shore Rowing Club was provided with 47% of the asking amount and other sporting clubs were provided with 83, 50, and 63% of their asking amounts. 

 

3.i

Issue with donations above $10,000 – there needs to be more detail on exactly what programs they are running, e.g. Sydney Community Services and Centrehouse – what proportion of that money goes to what programs.  This transparency will enable residents to determine whether they support the grants towards those programs

Council enters into a tailored Service Agreement with any organisation that receives funds of more than $20,000.  This agreement outlines the organisations roles, responsibilities and reporting expectations for the programs they have received funding for.

 

In the Financial Assistance Grants Programs in future years Council will provide a table on the website that outlines the amount of funds and what they will be spent on for applicants receiving over $10,000 during the Public Exhibition period.  

General Comment

 

Thank you for sending through the breakdown to the Proposed Financial Assistance 2018/2019.  I think those donations make sense

 

 

Applications made by Multiple Sclerosis Limited and The Shepherd Centre

 

Multiple Sclerosis Limited

 

Multiple Sclerosis Limited requested funding to support the costs of a yoga class for people with MS held in the Lane Cove Bowling Club each week during school terms. They provided information about the therapeutic benefits of such a class.

There is no funding for this and participants need to pay for the service.  Often people with MS are reliant on a pension or use the NDIS for financial support and to attend activities, however once they reach the age of 65 they are no longer eligible for NDIS funding.  The funds requested in the grant are to enable the people living with MS in Lane Cove to attend the classes so they can get the many physical and mental health benefits the classes provide.

 

While Multiple Sclerosis Limited receives funding from the State and Federal Government and fundraising efforts the money is used to provide free services to the community in the ACT, NSW, Victoria and Tasmania such as an advisory service, peer support programs, a nursing service, health professionals for one on one support, education and volunteering programs. They also provide funding to advocacy and research.

 

The Shepherd Centre

 

The Shepherd Centre runs five centres and two preschools that are located across NSW and the ACT. They also offer outreach specialist services to families who are unable to attend the centres in person as they may live in rural and remote areas of Australia or be based overseas.  They receive 26% of their funding from the NSW Government, 58% from fundraising and 16% from other non-disclosed sources.

 

As a part of their program they may provide services to children who have graduated from the centres and preschools who attend local primary schools.  Often these children require additional help to interact with the teachers and peers.  The Shepherd Centre asked for funding to assist four Lane Cove families to be a part of the ‘Confident ClassMATE’ program which teaches additional social and interacting skills.

 

These classes are provided when the children are identified as requiring extra support with the skills more easily learnt by hearing children.  Often families do not ask for this form of assistance in the NDIS package as the need was not identified when the assessment was made.  It is extremely difficult to make changes in the NDIS funding after the plans have been approved.

 

If this grant is successful Council will inform The Shepherd Centre that funds for this purpose will not be given again

 

Conclusion

 

Council’s Financial Assistance Grants Program assists in the development of a range of community based services which meet, and are responsive to changes in the needs of people living and working in Lane Cove.  It promotes equitable outcomes in terms of access to services and quality of life for all residents.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.   Council, having considered the submissions received during the Public Exhibition, proceed with grants as adopted by Council on 21 May, 2018;

 

2.   Council give consideration to Financial Assistance Grants to the Shepherd Centre and Multiple Sclerosis Inc for 2018-2019;

 

3.   Should Council proceed with the grants under Part 1, Council give Public Notice of the proposed Financial Assistance Grants to the Shepherd Centre and Multiple Sclerosis Inc if adopted, and subject to no objections being received, grant the funds to the recommended groups;

 

 

4.   Council provide a table on the website in future years outlining the amount of funds and what they will be spent on for applicants receiving over $10,000 during the Public Exhibition period

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jennifer Bice

Acting Executive Manager - Human Services

Human Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 23 July 2018

Local Government Conference NSW 2018

 

 

Subject:          Local Government Conference NSW 2018    

Record No:     SU6609 - 43285/18

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):       Craig Dalli 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council has received correspondence from Local Government NSW concerning their Annual Conference.  In preparation for the Conference, Local Government NSW have asked all councils to consider the key issues affecting its community.  These issues will be discussed and debated during the business sessions of the Conference.  This report recommends that Council give consideration to the primary issues affecting the Lane Cove community and endorse the delegates including the four (4) voting delegates for the motions at Conference.

 

Discussion

 

The Annual Conference of Local Government NSW (LGNSW) will be held from 21-23 October 2018 in Albury.  A Draft Program for the Conference is shown attached as AT-1.

 

Details of the requirements and criteria for submission of motions to be considered at the Conference are outlined below. It is noted that under LGNSW rules and the formula for calculating voting entitlements, Council will be entitled to nominate four (4) voting delegates for voting on motions considered at the Conference.

 

Criteria for Motions

 

In order to ensure debate centers on advancing the sector wide policy agenda, proposed motions should seek to be strategic (as opposed to operational), affect members state-wide and introduce new or emerging policy issues and actions.  As much as possible proposed motions should call on a specific body (e.g. LGNSW, state government, federal government, a specific Department or Minister) and have a specific outcome that the motion is aiming to achieve.     

 

It is noted that new motions should have regard to the resolutions and outcomes of last year’s Conference.  These are attached as AT-2, ‘2017 Action Report’.  Motions will only be included in the Business Paper for the Conference where they comply with the following seven (7) board endorsed criteria:-

 

1.   Are consistent with the objects of the Association;

2.   Relate to Local Government in NSW and/or across Australia;

3.   Concern or are likely to concern Local Government as a sector, not focused on a local issue only;

4.   Seek to advance the Local Government policy agenda of the Association and/or improve governance of the Association;

5.   Have a lawful purpose (a motion does not have a lawful purpose if its implementation would require or encourage non-compliance with prevailing laws);

6.   Are clearly worded and unambiguous in nature; and

7.   Do not express preference for one or several members over one or several other members.

 

Categories

 

Councils have been requested to identify issues or motions relating to the following overall categories:-

 

·    Industrial Relations & Employment

Industrial relations and employment related legislation, industrial awards and rates of pay, WHS and workers compensation compliance, human resources policy, practice and benchmarking, workforce planning and development, staff and councillor training and development, skills shortages, staff attraction, retention and productivity, employment security, workplace change, Code of Conduct, leadership and management capacity, capability framework and council governance.

 

·    Economic

Own source revenue (e.g. rates, fees, charges etc.), intergovernmental fiscal relations (e.g. grants, cost shifting etc.), financial management and governance including long term financial planning and asset management, financial sustainability, economic policy affecting Local Government, local and regional economic development (including tourism), transport (e.g. roads, bridges, airports, pedestrian and cycle facilities, rail), Local Water Utilities, stormwater and floodplain infrastructure, other infrastructure and disaster management and recovery.

 

·    Infrastructure and Planning

Public Transport provision (i.e. including buses, trains, light rail etc). Infrastructure provision, upgrade, maintenance and management i.e. Roads, bridges, airports, pedestrian cycling facilities. Traffic management and pedestrian safety, telecommunications and digital economy infrastructure particularly in rural areas, financial assistance and incentives from State and Federal Governments for infrastructure delivery and maintenance.

 

·    Environmental

Land use planning (including environmental, heritage conservation and development planning), ecologically sustainable development, waste management in accordance with the waste hierarchy and extended producer responsibility, natural resource management, protection of local, regional and state natural environments including air quality, rivers and waterways and biodiversity, biosecurity and weeds management, pollution prevention including energy consumption and soil contamination, environmental risk management through reduction of hazards and pollutants and remediation/rehabilitation of degraded environments, climate change mitigation and adaptation, and responsible resource consumption and conservation.

 

·    Governance / Civic Leadership

Local Government legislative and regulatory settings (e.g. Australian and/or NSW Constitutional recognition, Local Government Act review), corporate governance (e.g. role differentiation for Mayors, Councillors, General Managers and senior staff, Codes of Conduct, Political donations), structural reform (e.g. amalgamations and/or boundary changes, shared resources and services), Local Government elections (e.g. financial impact of electoral reforms on councils, impact of electoral reforms), participation (e.g. women’s participation rates as councillors, cultural diversity in leadership, other opportunities for citizens to genuinely participate in council processes), and policies and programs of other spheres of government that impact on Local Government governance or citizen involvement in local democracy.

 

 

 

·    Social Policy

Social planning, social impact assessment, access, equity and social justice, community development and community cultural development, community halls and neighborhood centers, ageing and disability services, women’s services, youth services and children’s care and education services, issues of concern and interest to NSW Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, cultural services (performing and visual arts, art galleries, performing arts centers, museums, public art, community arts, festivals, celebrations, heritage, new media and digital arts), Libraries, Health services (regulatory activities reducing public health risks, promoting healthy lifestyles, immunisation, early childhood health centers or rural medical services), Recreation facilities and services, and crime prevention planning.

 

Suggested Motions

 

In view of the criteria and categories for Motions, the following are suggested Motions for the 2018 Conference.

 

MOTION

 

Review of Arts and Cultural Policy Regions

 

That Local Government NSW call on the NSW Government to review the impacts of the current model of grouping of LGA’s into only three distinct regions in the State Government’s Arts and Cultural Policy framework and the resulting impact on associated funding priorities. The review to consider and identity:-

 

(i)         any recommendations as to how State Government arts and cultural funding can be allocated to better meet and reflect the needs of local communities; 

(ii)        should gaps be identified, funding levels to be increased rather than redistributed; and

(iii)       the review to also include recommendations on how arts and cultural life be incorporated into liveability indicators in place-making and local strategic planning with appropriate Government funding to better support local and district based arts and cultural infrastructure and initiatives and enhance seeding grants to energise the creative sector at the local level to deliver social and economic benefits.

 

Background

 

The three regions in Create in NSW, namely Sydney, Western Sydney and Regional NSW, reflect a state-based tier of funding when at the local level there are more distinct regions which may benefit from opportunities for State Government support. For example, around 70% of State funding goes to State Cultural Institutions which fall under the category of ‘Sydney’. The (NSROC) Northern Sydney Regional Organisation of Council’s areas make up close to 8% of the population of NSW and receives just 0.0056% of related state funding. While the policy framework for Create NSW refers to Sydney as a distinct region, it is not listed as a priority area in the Arts and Cultural Development program for funding. With Create NSW the State Government objection is for everyone in NSW to enjoy the benefits that come from experiencing and participating in arts and culture. The rhetoric around the State Government’s discussions of arts and culture at such macro regional levels may be skewing the level of financial support received at the local level

 

Restoration of Public Library Funding Cuts

 

MOTION

That LGNSW calls on the State Government to restore and increase and funding for Public Libraries.

 

Background

 

The NSW Government has slashed $1,275m from public library funding in the 2018/19 State Budget. This reflects a 5% cut to the recurrent funding with metropolitan councils completely locked out of infrastructure funding. As a result, many councils are likely to receive a reduced Library Subsidy and Local Priority Grant.

 

It is noted that the $1.85 per capita subsidy for public libraries has not been indexed since 1990’s. This motion supplements the combined LGNSW and NSW Public Libraries Association Renew our Libraries campaign. 

 

MOTION

 

Statewide Library Management System for all NSW Councils

 

That LGNSW calls on the State Government to investigate development and introduction of a statewide library management system to provide communities throughout NSW greater access to larger collections and library resources and materials.

 

Background

 

Lane cove has been a founding member of Shorelink which has successfully implemented a library management system across the Lower North Shore, with extensive benefits to residents including one reciprocal borrowing rights (effectively one library card). A statewide Library Management System (LMS) has the potential to provide a single platform that delivers customers and library staff with convenient access to a greatly expended range of materials thorough an integrated electronic resource. Benefits of a statewide LMS include:-

 

·    Access to a larger range of collections through one library card;

·    Enhanced consistency and customer service experience;

·    Prompts future innovation in public library services to better meet the changing needs of the community;

·    Financial and efficiency advantages to councils and the State Government; and

·    Strengthens links and connections amongst the Public Library Network.

Such a project is currently being developed by the South Australia Public Library Service.

 

Conclusion

 

Therefore it will be recommended that Council give consideration to the primary issues affecting the Lane Cove community including the suggested Motions outlined in this report and refer them for consideration by Local Government NSW for inclusion on the 2018 Conference Agenda.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

1.    Give consideration to the suggested Motions outlined in this report and other primary issues affecting the Lane Cove community and submit same for debate at the 2018 Local Government NSW Annual Conference; and

2.    Authorise delegates to attend the Conference and nominate Council’s four (4) voting delegates for motions before the Conference.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Local Government NSW Annual Conference - Draft Program 2018

4 Pages

 

AT‑2View

LGNSW - 2017 Annual Converence Action Report

18 Pages

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 23 July 2018

Sydney Planning Summit

 

 

Subject:          Sydney Planning Summit    

Record No:     SU6998 - 40963/18

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):       Simon Cole 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The Sydney Planning Summit to be held on 28 – 29 November 2018 at Dockside, Circular Quay will provide an opportunity for the discussion and review of latest strategies, policies and developments in urban planning in Sydney. 

 

This recommendation will authorise the attendance of interested Councillors at the Summit.

 

Background

 

The Sydney Planning Summit will provide an opportunity for discussion and review of the latest strategies, plans, policies, infrastructure and technology developments proposed to sustainably manage the anticipated growth of Sydney over the next decade.  A number of key presenters have been secured to cover the following topics:-

 

·      A Metropolis of Three Cities;

·      The Future Transport Strategy 2056;

·      State Infrastructure Strategy 2018 – 2038;

·      Greener Places policy;

·      Energy in 2050:  Impacts and Opportunities for Sydney;

·      Designing the future with augmented and virtual reality;

·      Financing urban services and infrastructure;

·      Housing affordability;

·      Planning for population growth;

·      Planning for an ageing population;

·      Urban expansion;

·      The role of planning in achieving better environmental outcomes and water sensitive urban design; and

·      Factoring climate change into planning and infrastructure decisions.

 

Some of the confirmed speakers are:

 

·      Lucy Turnbull, Chief Commissioner, Greater Sydney Commission;

·      Carolyn McNally, Secretary, Department of Environment and Planning;

·      Hon. Clover Moore, Lord Mayor, Sydney;

·      Clare Barnes-Gardiner, Deputy Secretary, Freight Strategy and Planning, Transport for NSW;

·      Fiona Morrison, Commissioner, Open Space and Parkland; and

·      Suzanne Dunford, Strategic Delivery Manager, Climate Change, NSW Office of Environment and Heritage.

 

Discussion.

 

Funds are available for attendance by Councillors as part of their Councillor Professional Development.  The cost for attendance is $995 per delegate which may be reduced depending on the number of delegates. 

 

Further details on the event can be found at www.sydneyplanning2018.com.au.

 

Conclusion

 

Attendance at the event would provide a professional development opportunity for Councillors and staff and a greater understanding of the challenges and strategies proposed in sustainability managing a rapidly growing Sydney over the next decade.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That available Councillors be authorised to attend the Sydney Planning Summit on 28-29 November 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

  


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 23 July 2018

Changes to the Management of Crown Reserves

 

 

Subject:          Changes to the Management of Crown Reserves    

Record No:     SU3587 - 42021/18

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):       Craig Dalli 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The Minister for Lands and Forestry has announced the commencement of the Crowns Lands Management Act 2016, and amendments to the Roads Act 1993 commencing from 1 July 2018, which will revert the management of Crown reserves to Council and authorise Council to determine road and laneway closure applications. 

 

This report outlines the impact of the changes to management of Crown Lands and the processing of road closure applications.

 

Background

 

Council acts as Trustee for a number of Crown reserves and with the commencement of the Act has became the Manager of the reserves and must manage them in the same way other Council properties are managed under the Local Government Act 1993. A schedule of Crown Lands now managed by Council under the Local Government Act 1993 from 1 July 2018 is at AT-1. It is noted that each of these properties whilst previously maintained by Council as either bushland reserves, open space, playgrounds, sporting facilities, tennis courts or foreshore access, were all managed by Council under former Crown Lands legislation. However, Council previously needed approval from the Minister for Lands and Forestry for works and uses including leases such as Greenwich Baths and Lane Cove Tennis club. 

 

The change in management arrangements will not impact on existing management and maintenance costs or rental returns for the respective Crown reserves.

 

The transition of the management of Crown reserves, involves the classification of the reserves as ‘operational’ or ‘community’ land under the Local Government Act, and the categorisation of the reserves under one or more categories depending on its primary uses. Classifications include:-

 

·    Natural areas;

·    Bushland;

·    Wetlands;

·    Sportsgrounds;

·    Areas of cultural significance e.g. Aboriginal heritage; and

·    Community use;

 

Council will have 3 years from 1 July 2018, to prepare Plans of Management for each of the Crown reserves, with generic plans for bushland areas, playgrounds, sportsgrounds and the like permissible.  The State Government has provided Council support funding of $30,000 to assist with undertaking the preparation of the Plans of Management, which will initially require Ministerial approval. Staff will assess whether site specific Plans of Management are required to meet the Crown Land requirements, and is expected that the Grant funding will not be sufficient to cover the cost of the plans. Council will need to make suitable budget provisions in future years to meet the additional cost.

 

Also following changes to the Roads Act, councils will now have the power to close public roads and laneways within their local government area.

 

Prior to these changes, Council had to notify and advertise proposed road and laneway closures such as the closure of part of the road area in Pinaroo Place and the laneway which is being relocated and upgraded as part of the redevelopment of 25-29 Longueville Road. Following the consultation, Council was required to consider all submissions, attempt to resolve objections and then make applications to the Minister for Lands and Forestry to approve the closures. As a result, Council following community engagement can now make a formal decision based on local factors on whether to proceed with the closure application, saving at least 6 months in processing time when referring applications to the Department of Lands and Forestry for determination.

 

Conclusion

 

The changes to the management of Crown reserves is a positive outcome for the community in allowing it greater input into the management of local reserves and better reflecting local priorities, needs and uses of the reserves as well as priorities within Livable Lane Cove 2035 and the 3 year Delivery Program. The changes also provide a more efficient outcome reducing steps in the approval process for leases and licences for use of part or the whole of Crown reserves. Similarly, the closure of part or the whole of a road or public laneway is considered best determined on an LGA basis, with the determination to consider local planning objectives, infrastructure and access issues .

 

In addition to the community benefits of these changes, there will be a reduction in time and costs with determining applications and managing Crown reserves particularly with onerous conditions of approval being placed on uses and leases of reserves from time to time. There is no increase in costs with maintaining Crown reserves as each reserve is currently managed/maintained by Council as Trustee or lessees.   

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Lane Cove LGA Council Crown Reserves

2 Pages

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 23 July 2018

Local Government Superannuation Scheme

 

 

Subject:          Local Government Superannuation Scheme     

Record No:     SU2009 - 40290/18

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):       Geoff Banting 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council at its meeting of 18 June 2018 resolved that a report be prepared providing an update on the additional contributions requested from Local Government Superannuation and the history in relation to the charges levied against Council since 2008.

 

Background

 

In November 2008 the Local Government Superannuation Scheme (LGSS) advised member councils that due to the impact of the global financial crisis that there was a need to raise additional contributions to fund the deficit incurred as a result of investment losses. At that time the estimated deficit was around $297 million. The LGSS proposed a significant increase in contributions over a ten year period to offset the financial position of the fund and necessary to meet its member’s defined entitlements.

 

In February 2018 Council was advised of the Trustee’s resolution for the contribution plan commencing from 1 July 2018. The resolution, as advised, was based on a review and report presented to the Board by the funds actuary. The advice included:-

 

1.   Timeframe – an Additional Contribution will continue until at least 30 June 2021, however the financial position of the Fund is consistently monitored and the funding requirement may be reassessed;

 

2.   Amount Payable – the actuary reviewed the financial position of the Fund as at 30 June 2017 resulting  in the Board resolving for the Pooled Employers to continue to make additional contributions at a rate of $40M p.a. until June 2021 i.e. 3 years; and

 

3.   Apportionment Basis – the amount payable for the financial year commencing from 1 July 2018 will be calculated based on each Council’s proportion of the total defined benefit liabilities as at 30 June 2017, taking into account the maturing nature of the fund.

As a result, Council’s additional contribution for the year 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019 will be $177,000. This amount has been provided for in Council’s 2018/19 Budget.

 

The impact on Council, in relation to Additional Contributions, since 2008 is provided in the following table:

 

Year

Additional Contributions

2009/10

$324,000

2010/11

$193,255

2011/12

$193,255

2012/13

$193,255

2013/14

$193,255

2014/15

$193,255

2015/16

$240,168

2016/17

$193,050

2017/18

$143,000

2018/19

$177,000

 

 

As advised by LGSS the deficit to fund defined entitlements as at 30/6/17 was $54.9 million. As a result and as a measure to restore the fund to a satisfactory financial position to comply with the regulatory standards set by APRA, and a desire to reduce future investment risk, additional contributions of $40 million per annum payable by member Councils will continue to at least 30 June 2021.

 

Variations in the contributions each year can also be dependent on the number of staff within the scheme at that time their salaries and resultant liability.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 23 July 2018

Council Snapshot

 

 

Subject:          Council Snapshot    

Record No:     SU220 - 41888/18

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):       Craig Wrightson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Attached for the information of Councillors is a review of Council’s recent activities.  This report provides a summary of the operations of each Division for June 2018.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Council Snapshot - June 2018

43 Pages