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Agenda

Ordinary Council Meeting

16 April 2018

The meeting commences at 6.30pm. If members of the public are

not interested in any business recommended to be considered in

Closed Session or there is no such business, Council will ordinarily

  commence consideration of all other business at 7pm.

 

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Notice of Meeting

 

Dear Councillors

 

Notice is given of the Ordinary Council Meeting, to be held in the Council Chambers, 48 Longueville Road Lane Cove on Monday 16 April 2018 commencing at 6:30pm. The business to be transacted at the meeting is included in this business paper.

 

Craig - GMYours faithfully

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

 

Council Meeting Procedures

 

The Council meeting is chaired by the Mayor, Councillor Pam Palmer. Councillors are entitled to one vote on a matter. If votes are equal, the Chairperson has a second or casting vote. When a majority of Councillors vote in favour of a Motion it becomes a decision of the Council. Minutes of Council and Committee meetings are published on Council’s website www.lanecove.nsw.gov.au by 5pm on the Thursday following the meeting.

 

The Meeting is conducted in accordance with Council's Code of Meeting Practice. The order of business is listed in the Agenda on the next page. That order will be followed unless Council resolves to modify the order at the meeting. This may occur for example where the members of the public in attendance are interested in specific items on the agenda.

 

Members of the public may address the Council Meeting on any issue for a maximum of 3 minutes during the public forum which is held at the beginning of the meeting. All persons addressing the Meeting must speak to the Chair. Speakers and Councillors will not enter into general debate or ask questions.

 

If you do not understand any part of the information given above; require assistance to participate in the meeting due to a disability; or wish to obtain information in relation to Council, please contact Council’s Executive Manager – Corporate Services on 99113550.

 

Please note meetings held in the Council Chambers are recorded on tape for the purposes of verifying the accuracy of minutes and the tapes are not disclosed to any third party under the Government Information (Public Access)  Act 2009, except as allowed under section 18(1) or section 19(1) of the PPIP Act, or where Council is compelled to do so by court order, warrant or subpoena or by any other legislation.

 

 

 


Ordinary Council 16 April 2018

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

APOLOGIES

 

OPENING OF MEETING WITH PRAYER

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT TO COUNTRY

 

NOTICE OF WEBCASTING OF MEETING

 

MATTERS RECOMMENDED BY THE GENERAL MANAGER TO BE CONSIDERED IN CLOSED COMMITTEE

 

Confidential Items

 

1.       Tender for Bus Shelters - Design, Construct, Maintain and Advertising Rights

It is recommended that the Council close so much of the meeting to the public as provided for under Section 10A(2) (c) (d) of the Local Government Act, 1993, on the grounds that the report contains information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business; AND the report contains commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret; it further being considered that discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to public interest by reason of the foregoing. 

 

public forum

 

Members of the public may address the Council Meeting on any issue for 3 minutes.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

 

2.      ORDINARY COUNCIL MEETING - 19 MARCH 2018

 

Orders Of The Day

 

Notices of Motion

 

3.       Clearways - Burns Bay Rd & Centennial Avenue

 

4.       Lane Cove North and Mowbray Precinct Traffic Review

 

5.       Market Square Car Park Operating Hours and Plaza Access

 

Officer Reports for Determination

 

6.       New Medium Density Housing Code and Low Rise Medium Density Design Guide

 

7.       Review of Affordable Housing - 150 Epping Road, Lane Cove West

 

8.       Waiting Times Lane Cove Bus Interchange 2018

 

9.       Sustainability Small Grants - Round 15

 

10.     Draft Community Strategic Plan 2035, 2018/2019 Draft Budget, Fees and Charges and Delivery Program and Operational Plan

 

11.     March 2018 Traffic Committee Meeting

 

Officer Reports for Information

 

12.     Street Libraries in Lane Cove

 

13.     NSROC Regional Sportsground Strategy

 

14.     Council Snapshot  

 

 

 

 

                    


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 April 2018

Clearways - Burns Bay Rd & Centennial Avenue

 

 

Subject:          Clearways - Burns Bay Rd & Centennial Avenue    

Record No:    SU5237 - 21053/18

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):      Councillor Andrew Zbik 

 

 

Background

 

In December 2017, the Roads and Maritime Service (RMS) announced under the NSW Government Clearways Program that clearways were to be implemented on Burns Bay Rd between Fig Tree Bridge and Penrose St and Burns Bay Rd/Centennial Ave between Penrose St and Epping Rd.

 

After a period of consultation in December 2017 and January 2018 by the RMS, no changes were made to the proposed hours of operation of the clearways.

The hours of operation of the clearways are shown in the below table:-

 

New clearways (both directions)

Weekdays

Weekends and public holidays

Centennial Avenue and Burns Bay Road between Epping Road and Penrose Street

6am-10amand

3pm-7 pm

9am to 6pm

Burns Bay Road between Penrose Street and Victoria Road

6am to 7pm

9am to 6pm

 

Following the motion passed by Council in February 2018 regarding this matter, further information has been gathered following the lodgement of a GIPA by resident Paul Clarke.

 

This GIPA identified the following from SCATS TCS 2287 which shows that the implementation of clearways does not entirely satisfy the benchmark to determine the need of clearways as per Australian Standard AS2890.5-1993 Part 5: On Street parking section 5.3.2.

 

Of note:

•        The weekday peak AM, the benchmark for +800 cars per lane per hour is satisfied between 6am to 10am northbound, but not southbound;

•        The weekday peak PM, the benchmark of +800 cars per lane per hour is satisfied between 3pm to 7pm southbound, but not northbound;

•        The weekend AM northbound only satisfied the benchmark for +800 cars per lane per hour between 10am to 2pm; and

•        The weekend PM southbound only satisfied the benchmark for +800 cars per lane per hour between 10am to 6pm.

 

Since the implementation of the clearways, the following issues have been noted:-

1.       Buses operated by Sydney Buses are continuing to park in the designated clearway lanes at the north-east corner of the Fig Tree Street and Centennial Avenue intersection;

2.       A local business that caters for school aged children has been forced to close down its operations due to the removal of safe street parking;

3.       The garbage pickup service for Lane Cove was unable to collect rubbish bins on Sutherland Street, Finlayson Street and Gardenia Avenue due to excessive parked cars that would otherwise have parked on Centennial Ave; and

4.       A family on Burns Bay Rd have had to alter plans for their home renovations due to the inaccessibility of their property and the inability of delivery trucks to park on the road to unload construction supplies.

 

At a community meeting on Friday 23rd March with the NSW Shadow Minister for Roads - Jodi McKay MP, local residents affected by the implemented clearways stated that they are not opposed to the clearways and understand the need during peak hours in the direction of peak hour traffic flow.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

1.       Seek a meeting with the NSW Minister for Roads Melinda Pavey and RMS to discuss:-

a.      That data for traffic flow per lane per hour does not warrant the imposed hours of operation of clearways on Centennial Ave and Burns Bay Rd;

b.      Seek an explanation why all day weekend clearways have been imposed on Burns Bay Rd and Centennial Avenue given other main arterial roads such as Pacific Highway between St Leonards to Gordon have not had the same weekend clearway hours of operation imposed;

c.      Seek a commitment to operate a clearway northbound in the morning AM peak only along Centennial Ave between Penrose St and Epping Rd;

d.      Seek a commitment to operate a clearway southbound in the afternoon PM peak only along Centennial Ave between Penrose St and Epping Rd;

e.      Seek a commitment to remove the operation of clearways in both directions on weekends along Centennial Ave between Penrose St and Epping Rd;

f.       Seek a commitment to remove the operation of clearways along Burns Bay Rd between Fig Tree Bridge and Penrose St between 10am and 3pm on weekdays; and

g.      Seek a commitment to reduce the all day operation of clearways along Burns Bay Rd between Fig Tree Bridge and Penrose St on weekends.

2.       Seek cooperation from the RMS to consider the installation of an additional left turn lane from Penrose Street to Burns Bay Rd;

3.       Seek cooperation from the RMS to consider the installation of right turn traffic signals in both north bound and southbound directions for the traffic lights at the Fig Tree Ave/Barwon Rd/Centennial Ave intersection; and

4.       Seek cooperation from the RMS to consider the installation for a pedestrian crossing at the Oak Ave/Gentle St/Centennial Ave intersection.

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor Andrew Zbik

Councillor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 April 2018

Lane Cove North and Mowbray Precinct Traffic Review

 

 

Subject:          Lane Cove North and Mowbray Precinct Traffic Review    

Record No:    SU1361 - 21269/18

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):      Councillor Karola Brent; Councillor Andrew Zbik; Councillor Daniel Strassberg 

 

 

Representations have been received recently from residents of Lane Cove North, Lane Cove West and the Stringybark Creek Residents Association regarding traffic issues arising from the increased density in Lane Cove North and the Mowbray Precinct.

 

It is proposed to look at all the issues which have been highlighted so that fixing one problem does not have negative consequences elsewhere.  In other words, a holistic approach and solution needs to be found.

 

The following areas with problems have been highlighted:

 

Mowbray Road / Pacific Highway Intersection

 

Residents are concerned about the increase in traffic resulting from the installation of two right-turn lanes for southbound traffic on Pacific Highway turning west into Mowbray Rd. Eastbound cars on Mowbray Rd currently cannot turn right onto Pacific Highway southbound, which results in unplanned-for car movements as motorists work around the no-right-turn ban. Residents suggest allowing right-hand turns onto Pacific Highway to aid travel to Sydney CBD in the mornings.

 

Mowbray Road / Centennial Avenue Intersection

 

The need to complete the proposed alterations to the traffic signals at the Mowbray Road and Centennial Avenue intersection is immediate. These alterations would allow eastbound motorists on Mowbray Road to turn right (southbound) onto Centennial Avenue without holding up traffic for up to 20minutes during peak hours.

 

Centennial Avenue / Epping Road Intersection

 

Southbound motorists on Centennial Ave currently cannot turn right onto Epping Rd. Residents point out that allowing the right-hand turn would provide an alternative entry to Blackman Park via Munro Street and additional access to Lane Cove West Public School. A signalized turning arrow is already installed at this intersection but was not activated as planned at the completion of the Lane Cove Tunnel.

 

Karilla Avenue “rat-run”

 

While volumes are low, cars are travelling too fast at the Karilla Ave / Kurri St intersection and at peak hours. Residents suggest closing Karilla Ave at Centennial Ave, except for left turns out.  An exception would need to apply to allow buses to turn right out of Karilla onto Centennial Ave. Residents also suggest allowing left turns into Landers Rd instead of into Karilla Ave.

In addition, the traffic measures along Parklands Avenue are rather convoluted due to access still being allowed at the Karilla Avenue and Centennial Avenue intersection.

 

Elizabeth Pde / Centennial Ave Intersection

 

Residents report that people do u-turns at Elizabeth Parade/ Centennial Ave to access the apartment blocks on Centennial Ave.

Rat running reportedly occurs from Elizabeth Pde to Mowbray Rd in the mornings and afternoons to escape the bank up on Centennial Ave.

 

Pedestrian Safety on Centennial Avenue

 

Safety issues are arising from residents crossing at the unmarked intersections of Elizabeth Parade, Karilla Avenue, Arding Street and Centennial Avenue to access the designated bus stops in both northbound and southbound directions. Pedestrians find it increasingly difficult to cross Centennial Avenue and lights at this intersection would make it safer to turn right out of Elizabeth Pde, reduce cars speeds on Centennial Ave and provide pedestrians with a safe place at which to cross the road.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

 

1.       Investigate the above issues raised by residents and  any other matters deemed appropriate for the area;

2.       Commence a holistic traffic study for the Lane Cove North/Mowbray Precinct; and

3.       Keep the residents and community stakeholders informed of its findings.

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor Karola Brent

Councillor

 

 

 

Councillor Andrew Zbik

Councillor

 

 

 

Councillor Daniel Strassberg

Councillor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 April 2018

Market Square Car Park Operating Hours and Plaza Access

 

 

Subject:          Market Square Car Park Operating Hours and Plaza Access    

Record No:    SU3474 - 21347/18

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):      Councillor Scott Bennison 

 

 

Background

 

When Lane Cove Market Square was constructed, Council and Woolworths (now SCA Property Group) entered into an agreement which includes joint management of the common property by a Building Management Committee.

 

SCA Property Group outsource their representation on this Committee to the Centre’s Managing Agents, Colliers International.

 

Under the agreement, access to and from Lane Cove Plaza and to all car parking levels is to be maintained regardless of whether Woolworths is trading, however, unfortunately this is not always the case. On many occasions such as ANZAC Day and public holidays, despite Council giving direct reminders of the agreement, Colliers International have failed to ensure that the public have access to and from Lane Cove Plaza and to all car parking levels of the Market Square Car Park. This is not a satisfactory situation for our residents.

 

So there is no confusion over access at future commemorative days and public holidays, Council should seek written agreement from SCA Property Group to include in the management agreement for Lane Cove Market Square as an essential term of the contract, that public access to the all levels of the car park and access to the Plaza is made available to the public at all times notwithstanding that Woolworths Supermarket may be closed. By doing this, it reinforces the importance of the issue and provides the ability for Council to press for remedies and penalties under the contract for non-compliance.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.       The General Manger write to SCA Property Group requesting that they agree to amend the management agreement for the Lane Cove Market Square Managing Agents to include an essential term requiring the Centre’s Managing Agents representative(s) to ensure that the public have access to and from Lane Cove Plaza and to all car parking levels of the Market Square Car Park regardless of whether Woolworths is trading; and

 

2.       Write to Colliers International and seek written confirmation of their understanding of the agreement, noting also that ANZAC day this year is on Wednesday 25 April and that Council expects the access to be open.

 

 

 

 

Councillor Scott Bennison

Councillor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

   


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 April 2018

New Medium Density Housing Code and Low Rise Medium Density Design Guide

 

 

Subject:          New Medium Density Housing Code and Low Rise Medium Density Design Guide    

Record No:    SU6580 - 20363/18

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):      Christopher Pelcz 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The purpose of this report is to inform Council that the NSW State Government has adopted a  Medium Density Housing Code (AT-1) and Low Rise Medium Density Design Guide (AT-2). The code will make changes to the Exempt and Complying Development codes, while the guide will provide planning and design standards.

 

The Medium Density Housing Code seeks to encourage a greater diversity of housing options by making it easier to build medium density homes that integrate with existing neighbourhoods.  The new provisions will allow dual occupancies, manor houses and multi-dwelling housing (terraces) to be undertaken through the Exempt and Complying development pathway if development is permissible in the current zoning and meets standards described in the guide. All other non-complying types of development will be subject to the normal Development Application process.

 

Existing housing stock (single family dwellings) in Lane Cove are zoned as R2 Low Density Residential and permit (with consent) forms of low scale dual occupancy and multi-dwelling housing. Currently both forms of development are permissible with consent in the R2 Low Density Residential zone.

 

Council has in place a number of controls (particularly lot and subdivision requirements) which will continue to apply to dual occupancies and multi-dwelling housing. It is important to note that while the provisions of the guide have immediate effect, the new Medium Density Housing Code will not take full effect until 6 July 2018.

 

Overall, these changes will have an impact on the existing R2 low density zone in the Lane Cove community. The introduction of manor houses is a new type of development which may require further monitoring and review to identify unintended consequences of the code. It is recommended that Council receive and note the report and monitor implementation.

 

Background

 

A draft medium density code and guide was publicly exhibited, by NSW State Government, from 12 October until 23 December 2016. The draft Design Guide and Explanation of Intended Effects (EIE) proposed changes to allow the construction and concurrent subdivision of dual occupancies, multi dwelling housing (terraces) and manor houses as complying development.

 

Council made a submission to these proposed changes in December 2016 raising the following key points:-

 

·    The Design Guide is not supported as a beneficial policy direction for housing in the Lane Cove LGA, most importantly because it is likely to result in inappropriate over-development in Lane Cove’s R2 Low Density Residential areas;

·    Moreover, existing development, operating under controls in the Lane Cove LGA has achieved the intent of the proposed Design Guide with less bulk and scale, an outcome more appropriate to the layout patterns and streetscape of the LGA;

·    Quality medium density development is already being viably achieved in the LGA’s R3 Medium Density Residential Zone under Council’s controls;

·    Complying development is not an appropriate mechanism for medium density development, especially where it permits density out of character with its context;

·    Complying development as a mechanism should focus on low impact proposals and not undermine strategic planning undertaken by Council in relation to the placement of future density;

·    A succinct high quality Medium Density Design Guide would be welcomed that could be used as a resource by Council when setting policy documents for medium density housing.

 

Despite these comments, it is clear that medium density or the ‘missing middle’ is a key policy direction for the NSW State Government and the Greater Sydney Commission. This is evident in the recently adopted Greater Sydney Region Plan and North District Plan which seeks to improve housing diversity and typology.

 

Discussion

Operation

 

The guide is in a similar format to the existing NSW State Government Apartment Design Guidelines and provides objectives and design criteria for each development type. Section 2 of the guide sets out a series of objectives and criteria, while Section 3 provides guidance on each criteria.

 

Typology

 

In the Low Rise Medium Density Design Guide, design standards have been created for three types of medium density housing – dual occupancies (detached, attached and vertical), manor houses, and multi-dwelling housing (terraces). They are defined as:

 

Type

Definition

Dual occupancy

dual occupancy (attached) means 2 dwellings on one lot of land that are attached to each other, but does not include a secondary dwelling.

dual occupancy (detached) means 2 detached dwellings on one lot of land, but does not include a secondary dwelling.

Manor House

A building containing 3 or 4 dwellings, where:

·      Each dwelling is attached to another dwelling by a common wall or floor, and

·      At least 1 dwelling is partially or wholly located above another dwelling, and

·      The building contains no more than 2 storeys (excluding any basement).

Multi dwelling housing (terraces)

Attached multi dwelling housing where all dwellings face and generally follow the alignment of one or more public roads.

 

Under the exempt and complying development system, any application must comply with all the provisions of the code and the guide. In particular, minimum lot sizes have been established for each of the development types as follows. 

 

Dual occupancies (detached and horizontally attached)

 

The area of a lot must not be less than the minimum lot area specified for dual occupancies in an environmental planning instrument (EPI). An EPI is a Council’s Local Environmental Plan which has minimum lot areas of 750 m2 (for attached dual occupancies) & 900 m2 (for detached dual occupancies).

 

As a result, if an applicant wishes to utilise the complying development pathway, any future application will need to comply with these standards. If not, the complying development pathway cannot be used and the normal Development Application process applies.

 

Manor Houses and Dual Occupancies (vertically attached)

 

In the case of dual occupancy (vertically attached) the same area mentioned above applies. However, in the case of a manor house, the area of the lot must not be less than 600 m2. A potential configuration of four dwellings on a corner lot is shown below.

 

 

This particular dwelling type is relatively new and is not considered as a typical medium density form. It appears to be relatively similar, in definition, to a residential flat building except it is no more than two storeys in height.

 

Multi-Dwelling Housing (Terraces) and Other Attached Development

 

In this case, Council does not have a minimum lot area specified in an EPI (Environmental Planning Instrument or LEP) for either multi-dwelling housing or other attached development. Although it does specify separate site area requirements (for multi-dwelling housing) in its Development Control Plan, this is not considered an EPI. Therefore, the minimum lot area (for both) under the code and guide is 600 m2.

 

It is considered appropriate for Council via a future Planning Proposal to introduce a new minimum lot area for multi-dwelling housing in the R2 Low Density Residential zone, however this would take time and will not be in place before the Code and Guide commence. 

 

Subdivision

 

Council recently had a Local Environmental Plan amendment finalised to prohibit all forms of subdivision for dual occupancies – this took full effect from 15 December 2017. The guide is very clear that this will continue:

 

Certain LEPs may not permit subdivision of a dual occupancy. If this is the case, the subdivision is not permitted under the Codes SEPP”.

 

These prohibitions are specifically stated in the new code under Clause 6.1(4) for strata subdivision and Clause 6.4(2)(a) for torrens subdivision.

 

Strata subdivisions and torrens subdivisions will, however, be allowed for manor houses or terraces if the development is consistent with the code (i.e. Minimum lot sizes).

 

Exclusions

 

Not all properties will be allowed to utilise the complying development pathway or the guide. The code (and guide) will only apply to land that is zoned as either R2 Low Density Residential or R3 Medium Density Residential. Existing land that is currently zoned as E4 Environmental Living will be excluded from using the code or guide.

 

Furthermore, the following development will not be considered complying development: 

(a)  the erection or alteration of, or an addition to, a roof terrace on the top most roof of a building,

(b)  development that is complying development under the Housing Alterations Code,

(c)  development on a battle-axe lot,

(d)  development that is attached to a secondary dwelling or group home,

(e)  the erection of a building over a registered easement,

(f)  the alteration of, or an addition to, a garage or carport that is located forward of the building line,

(g)  the erection of multi dwelling housing (terraces) on bush fire prone land.

 

Medium density complying development also cannot be carried out on land that is either a heritage item or draft heritage item.

 

Conclusion

 

A major concern is whether or not subdivision of dual occupancies are permissible, but the provisions make it clear that if a Local Environmental Plan does not permit subdivision of dual occupancies then it cannot occur or be granted under the code or guide. It is therefore appropriate that Council amend its LEP to include a minimum lot size of 750 m2.

 

Given that the controls in the Code and Guide are relatively similar to Council’s existing planning controls, it is hard to estimate how well this will be utilised. However, a ‘monitor and review’ approach is recommended to identify any unintended or unexpected consequences.


 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:-

1.       The report be received, noted and the General Manager to monitor and review the new Low Rise Medium Density Housing Code and the Low Rise Medium Density Design Guide to identify any unintended or unexpected consequences and report back to Council after 12 months.

2.       Council staff formalise the current DCP minimum lot size of 750 m2 by preparing a Planning Proposal to include the minimum lot size in the LEP.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Low Rise Medium Density Code - Adopted April 2018

74 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑2View

Low Rise Medium Density Design Guide - Adopted April 2018

210 Pages

Available Electronically

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 April 2018

Review of Affordable Housing - 150 Epping Road, Lane Cove West

 

 

Subject:          Review of Affordable Housing - 150 Epping Road, Lane Cove West    

Record No:    SU6257 - 18181/18

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Craig Dalli 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

As part of the consent conditions for the residential development at 150 Epping Road, Lane Cove, the developers were required to dedicate 15 units in their development to Council, to provide affordable housing in the Lane Cove area.

 

Given the current arrangements with Link Housing have been in place for approximately two (2) years, this report will provide an update and review of the management of these units and suggest some changes to the policy framework for the leasing of the units.

 

A key change proposed is to offer a two (2) year extension on the current maximum two (2) year term, subject to tenants continuing to meet the eligibility criteria.

 

Background

 

Council at its meeting on 21 March 2016, in considering a report on the management of Affordable/Key Worker Housing at 150 Epping Road, Lane Cove West, adopted the following eligibility criteria, to be used in the assessing of applications for Affordable/Key Worker Housing:-

a.    The applicant/s must have Australian citizenship or permanent residency;

b.    The applicant/s is to have a connection to Lane Cove LGA and or serves/works in Lane Cove LGA (e.g. employees of organisations servicing the Lane Cove LGA such as North Shore Hospital or Chatswood LAC for policing);

c.    The applicant/s does not have assets which they could be reasonably expected to use to solve their housing need; and

d.    The applicant/s income levels are generally consistent with the NRAS income limits.

Following the Council resolution, a competitive process to manage the 15 units on Council’s behalf in accordance with the adopted eligibility criteria resulted in the appointment of registered community housing provider Link Housing.

 

Discussion

The units comprise 2 x studio, 8 x 1 bedroom, 4 x 2 bedroom and 1 x 3 bedroom units, and since 2016 have been offered at a discount to market rent of not less than 20 per cent, adjusted to market trends.

Income tests related to Council’s affordable rental units have been determined by the Housing Income Eligibility limits in the NSW Affordable Housing Ministerial Guidelines[1], which are consistent with clause 6 of the Affordable Rental Housing SEPP (2009) and slightly more than the

National Rental Affordability Scheme (NRAS) income limits[2].  The Guidelines define household income at three levels for the Sydney region, shown in Table 1.

 

Household members

Very low

Low

Moderate

Single adult

$25,300

$40,600

$60,800

Each additional adults (over 18 years of age)

Add $12,700 to the income limit

Add $20,300 to the income limit

Add $30,400 to the income limit

Each additional child (under 18 years of age)

Add $7,600

Add $12,200

Add $30,400

Table 1: Household Income by Household Size

Council has allowed for moderate income households to become tenants in its units, to maximise the availability of the properties to people engaged in frontline services, generally referred to as key workers. The current income limits for applicants are shown in Table 2.

 

Household Numbers

Maximum household income

One adult

$60,800

Two adults

$91,200

Three adults

$121,000

Four adults

$152,000

Sole Parent with one child

$79,000

Sole Parent with two children

$97,200

Sole Parent with three children

$115,400

Couple with one child

$109,400

Couple with two children

$127,600

Couple with three Children

$145,800

Table 2: Moderate Household Income by Household Size

 

Over the past decade rising house prices and rents in Sydney have made it more difficult for lower and moderate income earners to find affordable rental housing. Rising house prices have also made it more difficult to accumulate a deposit for a first home. Median house prices have nearly doubled in some inner ring areas, and even in middle and outer ring areas such as Blacktown, Campbelltown and Penrith, prices rose by 75-77 per cent between 2011 and 2016[3]. These increases have knock-on impact on rental values.

 

In this environment, it is apparent that the market alone will not generate lower cost rental housing for the range of workers a city requires to be sufficiently close to centres and jobs.

 

Since Council adopted its criteria, there has been further policy analysis by State and Commonwealth Governments on addressing housing affordability and new programs have been introduced. Key Worker Housing initiatives generally relate to financial alternatives to support first home purchase by people engaged in frontline services such as police, ambulance, nurses firefighters and teachers. The Greater Sydney Regional Plan discussion on affordable rental housing is that is a means to reduce the need for social housing, and is focused on low and very low income households.

 

In 2017 the NSW Government introduced the housing affordability package to create incentives for greater supply of affordable housing. The impact of these measures will take some time to be apparent. Further, the direction of NSW planning policy for Sydney as set out in the Greater Sydney Regional Plan is that councils are expected to play their part in increasing the supply of a diversity of housing that allows people to relocate within their local area and stay connected to community services, friends and family[4].

 

Currently the units at 150 Epping Road are leased by households who work in a range of services and businesses that support the Lane Cove community, including health, aged and child care and businesses in the Lane Cove West business area.

 

Council’s intention is to continue to support people in paid employment up to moderate income household limits who have a reason to live or continue to live in the Lane Cove LGA on account of their connection to the area through employment, personal or other circumstances and is more appropriately referred to as Affordable Housing now and in the future.

 

Council’s Affordable Housing developments will contribute to:-

·    supporting the availability of a variety of housing types to suit the changing life circumstances of residents, such as family breakdowns;

·    helping to attract the workforce necessary for the functioning of government services and business centres;

·    assisting the community to have access to specialist job types such as shift workers in frontline emergency services; and

·    contributing to reducing traffic congestion.

 

As initial tenancies are approaching the current two (2) year limit, discussions have been held with Link Housing regarding demand, ongoing eligibility of existing tenants and the tenure period, to ascertain whether the current criteria are drawing interest from and maximising opportunities for people who are connected to the Lane Cove community to access affordable housing. 

 

Allocating and Reviewing Eligibility for Affordable Housing

 

Link Housing has confirmed all current tenants are income eligible and have at least one working adult employed in the Lane Cove area. Additionally, in many cases tenants now have other connections in the community through schooling, community participation and child care. However they also advise that the two year limit is uncommon amongst Council owned properties, and is unlikely to be long enough for tenants to accumulate funds for a home deposit.

 

The challenge is striking a balance between a sufficient length of tenure to allow tenants to move into home ownership or the private rental market and maximizing opportunities for more people to access to the limited supply of affordable housing. The issues are compounded by Sydney’s current mostly unaffordable housing market for both rental and home purchase, particularly in inner and middle ring suburbs.

 

Link Housing has proposed that Council offer an additional two (2) year extension to the current term for existing and new tenancies as they arise, as it provides tenants additional certainty of tenure to save for home purchase, to study to increase their earning capacity and time to transition to private rental. The two (2) plus two (2) year tenure is proposed to be clearly identified at sign up, along with a survey to identify the goals of the tenants during their tenure.

 

If the tenant no longer meets the eligibility criteria at the time of an annual review the tenant will be given notice that they no longer meet lease requirements and be given notice to vacate, with some flexibility for households where income increases by a margin of up to 10 per cent during the preceding 12 months.

To make clear Council’s expectations and to maintain the standard of the properties, the criteria will include that the number of residents in each complies with the Department of Family and Community Services Ministerial Guidelines on moderate overcrowding. Examples of moderate overcrowding are three children sharing a bedroom or two unrelated adults sharing a bedroom.

Conclusion

 

To ensure transparency in the allocation of the available housing, to respond to the diversity of moderate income people with a connection to Lane Cove and to establish clear direction to the community housing provider who manages the properties, it is recommended that Council adopt the following eligibility criteria for the allocation and management of the 15 rental properties. Rental will be maintained at 80 per cent of market rent, as independently determined.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council:-

1.       Receive and note the information; and

2.       Adopt the revised eligibility for allocation of the affordable rental properties:-

a)      Applicant/s must establish their identity and have Australian citizenship or permanent residency and be 18 years of age or older;

b)      Applicant/s or household members must have a demonstrated connection with and reason to live in the Lane Cove area on account of the location of their employment, links to service organisations supporting the Lane Cove area, carer responsibilities or such other circumstances that Council accepts;

c)      Applicant/s do not have assets which they could be reasonably expected to use to solve their housing requirements;

d)      The household income levels are consistent with the Moderate Income limits for the Sydney Region under the NSW Affordable Housing Ministerial Guidelines (as reviewed annually); and

e)      The applicant/s must be in paid employment and able to sustain a successful tenancy independently.

3.       The following strategies are adopted in relation to the management of Affordable / Key Worker Housing:-

a)      Rents are to be set at a discount to market rent of not less than 20 per cent, adjusted to market trends;

b)      The initial tenure for a lease shall be for two (2) years, with a probation period of six (6) months, reviewed annually with a final and maximum tenure of an additional two (2) years;

c)      A review of the eligibility of the tenant/s will be conducted every 12 months;

d)      If the annual review determines that the tenant no longer meets all the eligibility criteria the tenant will be given the notice to vacate for the period required by residential tenancy legislation;

e)      At the time of the annual reviews, existing tenants household incomes may be up to 10% above the Moderate Income limits for the Sydney Region under the NSW Affordable Housing Ministerial Guidelines;

f)       Vacancies will be direct marketed, including to local organizations; and

g)      The number of persons allocated to each property shall not breach moderate overcrowding as set out in the Department of Family and Community Services Guidelines.

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Affordable Housing Application Form

8 Pages

 

AT‑2View

Affordable Housing SEPP Review

1 Page

 

AT‑3View

Eligibility Criteria and Principles for the Management of Affordable Housing

1 Page

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 April 2018

Waiting Times Lane Cove Bus Interchange 2018

 

 

Subject:          Waiting Times Lane Cove Bus Interchange 2018    

Record No:    SU5851 - 19385/18

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Sashika Perera 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

In 2017, the NSW Government introduced additional bus services to accommodate the growing demand for public transport in Lane Cove and to ease the pressure at the Lane Cove Interchange.

 

This report compares the bus patronage survey results of March 2017 with that of March 2018 in terms of passenger wait times and concludes that the overall wait times at the Lane Cove Interchange have reduced as a result of the additional bus services introduced by the NSW Government.

 

Background

 

Council has previously received representations from the community in regards to the excessive wait times at the Lane Cove Bus Interchange (Stand A – Direct Service to City via Freeway) during the morning peak. Council considered the matter at its April 2017 meeting and resolved:-

“1.     Write to the State Minister for Transport and Infrastructure, The Hon. Andrew Constance MP and the Local Member, Hon. Anthony Roberts MP, requesting an additional 2-3 direct bus services during the morning peak to the City to commence at the Longueville Interchange to reduce current bus waiting times;

2.       Investigate options for the inclusion of a Lane Cove underground station in any future expansion of the new Sydney Metro Rail network; and

3.       Request a meeting with the State Minister for Transport and Infrastructure, The Hon. Andrew Constance MP to discuss this important matter.”

 

Following Council’s and the community’s representations, 10 additional bus services were introduced in the peak hour stopping at Lane Cove Interchange and travelling to the Sydney CBD.

 

To determine the extent of the passenger wait times, Council engaged Matrix Traffic and Transport Data in March 2017 to undertake a comprehensive on-site weekday patronage survey for a two week morning period from 13 March 2017 to 24 March 2017. This survey identified that buses arriving at the Lane Cove Interchange had insufficient capacity to accommodate all the commuters waiting at the interchange.  The data showed that while the maximum average weekly morning peak has a waiting time of six minutes, the maximum waiting time is up to 20 minutes.

 

In March 2018, Council once again commissioned Matrix Traffic and Transport Data to undertake a comprehensive on-site weekday patronage survey for a two week morning period from 26 February 2018 to 9 March 2018 to determine whether the passenger wait times have reduced.

 

Discussion

 

As depicted in Figure 1, the additional bus services in the peak hour have substantially reduced the maximum passenger wait time from 18 minutes in 2017 to 9.5 minutes in 2018. The data shows that the maximum wait time has reduced almost by half. The maximum average passenger wait time has reduced from six minutes in 2017 to four minutes in 2018 and the minimum wait times have also reduced.

 

 

Figure 1: Results of Bus Patronage Survey

 

Conclusion

 

As a result of the additional bus services introduced by the NSW Government, the overall passenger wait times at the Lane Cove Interchange have reduced. Given the key role this Interchange plays it is proposed to continue to monitor the wit time performance annually, or sooner should there be a perception that wait time are again increasing.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.       The report be received and noted; and

 

2.       Council write to the State Minister for Transport and Infrastructure, The Hon. Andrew Constance MP and the Local Member, Hon. Anthony Roberts MP, thanking them for the additional bus services during the morning peak that service the Lane Cove Bus Interchange and providing the results of Council’s study indicating a reduction in bus waiting times.

 

 

 

 

Martin Terescenko

Executive Manager - Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 April 2018

Sustainability Small Grants - Round 15

 

 

Subject:          Sustainability Small Grants - Round 15    

Record No:    SU6635 - 17847/18

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):      David Wilson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Applications for Round 15 of the Sustainable Small Grants Program, funded by Councils Sustainability Levy , closed on 16 March, 2018. Ten (10) applications were received and three (3) projects are recommended for funding.

 

Background

 

The purpose of the Sustainability Small Grants Program is to assist in the development of a range of initiatives that are of direct and practical benefit to a sustainable Lane Cove community. Organisations and community groups may apply for a grant of up to $5,000 to implement sustainability projects. (AT-1) Sustainability Small Grants Selection Criteria.

 

Discussion

 

Following advertising of Round 15 of the Sustainable Small Grants Program a total of ten (10) applications were received , nine (9) complying and one (1) non complying for funding:-

 

·    1st Lane Cove Scouts – 1st Lane Cove Hot Water System – replacement of an ‘old’ electric hot water system with the installation of an instantaneous gas hot water heater - $2,815;

 

·    1st Lane Cove Scouts - 1st Lane Cove Kitchen Refrigerator replacement – replacement of an energy intensive refrigerator with the purchase of an energy efficient refrigerator - $2,658;

 

·    Happy Kids Early Learning Centre - Recycling and Waste Minimization - purchase of garden equipment and plants, worm farm, guinea pigs and enclosure, payment for sustainability themed educational workshops - $1,785;

 

·    Lane Cove Retirement Units Association Ltd – Water Tank Implementation – purchase of two 10,000 litre water tanks and pumps - $5,000;

 

·    Lane Cove Theatre Company – Lighting Upgrade – purchase of LED stage lighting to replace energy intensive lighting - $5,000;

 

·    Lane Cove West Public School P&C Association – Water for Schools – installation of a duel bottle refill water station - $3,595;

 

·    Scouts Association of Australia – Tambourine Bay; Understanding the Way – purchase of turbidity cylinders and water sample jars, production of a GIS map of the catchment, educational brochure design and printing - $1,500.

 

·    Stringybark Creek Residents Association – Elizabeth Parade Community Garden – purchase of garden equipment and compost, planting of a native verge garden, build and installation of a street library and water barrel - $3,500; and

 

·    Tees to Totes – Up cycling pre-loved t-shirts into tote bags – purchase of fabric/ consumables, design of banners and educational brochure, reimbursement of storage space, fuel and room hire, re-imbursement for the Lane Cove Sustainability Action Group annual membership fee to the value of $5,000.

 

Following a review of the applications, it is recommended that three (3) projects receive funding as they are deemed to have direct and positive community based outcomes and long-term environmental benefits:-

 

·    1st Lane Cove Scouts – 1st Lane Cove HW System – reducing energy consumption and promoting energy efficient practices supports Councils goal of a more energy efficient community, to the value of $2,815;

 

·    Happy Kids Early Learning Centre - Recycling and Waste Minimization – waste minimization initiatives embed sustainability education in young people. Partial funding to the value of $1,400, in addition in kind contributions will be made including the provision of a worm farm and compost bin that Council will provide free of charge; and

 

·    Lane Cove Theatre Company – Lighting Upgrade – LED lights benefit the Theatre through lower electricity bills and improved usability. Local primary schools who borrow the lights for end-of-year performances will also benefit. Value of $5,000.

 

It is recommended Council not fund the following projects for the reasons listed below:-

 

·    1st Lane Cove Scouts - 1st Lane Cove Kitchen Refrigerator Replacement. Funding is not recommended in this round due to higher ranking projects. An application to receive funding can be submitted in Round 16;

 

·    Lane Cove Retirement Units Association Ltd – Water tank implementation. Funding is not recommended in this round due to higher ranking projects. An application to receive funding can be submitted in Round 16;

 

·    Lane Cove West Public School P&C Association – Water for Schools – Primary school infrastructure should be made to State Agencies. Grants are available to schools to purchase water refill stations via the Department of Education;

 

·    Scouts Association of Australia – Tambourine Bay; Understanding the Way – Water quality monitoring is already periodically being conducted in Tambourine Creek by Sydney Water. Additionally, the Warraroon Streamwatch group meets monthly to test water quality and record results; and

 

·    Tees to Totes – Up cycling pre-loved t-shirts into tote bags. The application has limited benefits for Lane Cove residents.

 

Budget

 

There is currently $9,353 remaining in the budget for this financial year. Funding of the successful applications totals $9,215.

 

Conclusion

 

The three (3) projects recommended for funding under the Sustainability Small Grants Program

would result in energy savings  and embed sustainable behaviour in the Lane Cove community.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

1.       Approve the funding for

a.      1st Lane Cove Scouts – Hot Water System - $2,815;

b.      Happy Kids Early Learning Centre - Recycling and Waste Minimization - $1,400; and

c.      Lane Cove Theatre Company – Lighting Upgrade - $5,000;

2.       Give Public Notice of the proposed funding under Round 15 of the Sustainability Small Grants Program, grant the funds as outlined above; and

3.       Thank all participants for their Small Grants applications.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Sustainability Small Grants Selection Criteria

7 Pages

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 April 2018

Draft Community Strategic Plan 2035, 2018/2019 Draft Budget, Fees and Charges and Delivery Program and Operational Plan

 

 

Subject:          Draft Community Strategic Plan 2035, 2018/2019 Draft Budget, Fees and Charges and Delivery Program and Operational Plan    

Record No:    SU6612 - 17853/18

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Craig Dalli 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report presents for consideration and adoption as drafts to be placed on public exhibition for six weeks, the following suits of documents with council’s Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework:

 

·    Draft Community Strategic Plan – Lane Cove 2035

·    Draft 2018/2019 Budget

·    Draft 2018/2019 Fees and Charges; and

·    Draft Delivery Plan 2018/2021 and Operational Plan 2018/2019

 

Background

 

Council adopted in 2011 the initial Community Strategic Plan (CSP) – Lane Cove 2025 in conjunction with the implementation of the Integrated planning and reporting framework for councils in NSW. The CSP which identifies the community’s main priorities and aspirations for the future must be reviewed by the new Council by 30 June 2018 and have at least a ten (10) year horizon. Therefore, the draft CSP will extend to a horizon of 2035 and be subject to review at least once every council term.

 

The 2018/19 Budget has been formulated in the context of continuing to maintain service delivery levels for existing and new residents and continuing the redevelopment of Rosenthal Car Park within an ongoing tight economic environment.  This combined with ongoing cost increases in utilities, the pressure local government generally is under from a variety of sources, has once again made the development of this budget difficult. Major pressures include:-

·    Continued rate pegging from the State Government has seen revenue lag behind actual costs, with only a 2.3% increase in Rates approved for 2018/19; and

·    Employee costs generally are anticipated to increase by approximately 2.5% for 2018/19.

 

Draft Budget for 2018/19

 

Budget Summary

 

The 2018/2019 Draft Budget as shown attached as (AT-1) was prepared using Council's normal format and arranged in program areas that reflect Council’s activities. The document contains explanatory notes that describe the activities covered by each of the programs.

 

The 2018/2019 Budget has been formulated on the basis of applying the principle of seeking a balanced budget in cash terms without reliance on debt. Despite the significant program of works and services, on an Accrual Accounting basis, Council’s budget shows a surplus which is required to cover non cash revenues; the revaluation of Market Square, Profit on Sale of Assets and estimated increase in Joint Ventures such as Civic Risk Mutual,  that are excluded in the most important Operating Surplus Ratio. In addition the surplus covers capital expenditure and projects.

 

To achieve this, the 2018/2019 Draft Budget was formulated based on materials and contracts being pegged at previous year levels. Any changes beyond this were made in an environment of contestability which required individual Divisional Managers to critically evaluate and justify program expenditures, matching each against their respective funding source thus leading to the containment of costs.   The draft budget as presented will continue to facilitate the achievement of Council’s objectives in the coming 12 months.

 

Fit for the Future Ratios

 

It is important in preparing the 2018/19 budget that financial sustainability ratios remain in a strong position and meet industry benchmarks.  The following comments are made in relation to the published Fit for the Future industry ratios:-

·    The balanced budget (in cash terms and an operating surplus) continues to ensure that the Operating Performance Ratio will remain above breakeven into the future;

·    Council’s own source revenue remains in a strong position, however is affected by the high level of Section 94 contributions and VPA that are expected to be received as Capital Contributions are excluded for own source revenue;

·    The Building and Infrastructure Asset Renewal Ratio also remains in a strong position and will continue to do so while Council experiences high levels of capital expenditure on new and existing projects;

·    The Infrastructure Backlog Ratio and Asset Maintenance Ratios, while unaudited, are both exceeding industry standards; and

·    Council remains debt free and is experiencing decreasing trends in the Real Operating Expenditure per capita.

 

 

Criteria

Benchmarks

Ratio

Comply

Sustainability

Operating Performance Ratio (greater or equal to break-even average over 3 years)

5.84%

Yes

Own Source Revenue Ratio (greater than 60%) average over 3 years

71.03%

Yes

Building and Infrastructure Asset Renewal Ratio (greater than 100%)

average over 3 years

363.73%

Yes

Effective Infrastructure Management

Infrastructure Backlog Ratio (less than 2%) 

0.73%

Yes

Asset Maintenance Ratio (greater than 100% average over 3 years)

242%

Yes

Debt Service Ratio (greater than 0 and less than or equal to 20% average over 3 years)

0%

Yes

Efficiency

Real Operating Expenditure per capita (decreasing over time)

0.89%

Yes

 


 

Budget Highlights

 

As noted in the Introduction and Budget Summary, Council is continuing with a period of significant investment in infrastructure, providing long term cultural, social and economic benefits to the Lane Cove Community and visitors to the area. Projects include:-

 

Rosenthal Car Park Redevelopment - $30,000,000 has been provided for the continued redevelopment of Rosenthal Car Park. Development has been staged over four years with additional funding of $30,000,000 provided for 2018/19 and $15,000,000 for 2018/19.

 

Mowbray Precinct – Open Space - $3,000,000 has been provided for the construction of new open space and an active recreation facilities in the Mowbray Precinct to cater for the additional population growth that is occurring in this area.

 

Aquatic Centre Olympic Pool and Grandstand - The Olympic Pool was built in 1961 and concern has been raised about its remaining lifespan. The grandstand has also reached the end of its economic life.  Council staff over the next year will progress planning for the replacement of both structures including public consultation and also prepare Development applications for the replacement, $500,000.

 

Traffic Signals - Funds have been allocated to upgrade traffic signals at Tambourine Bay/Burns Bay Road intersection.

 

Cultural Services – A total of $310,000 has been provided for cultural services programs including Sunset in the Village, Plaza decorations, Art Exhibition, Lane Cove Festival, Autumn Harmony Festival and Festival by the River.

 

Other Capital Projects

 

·    Kingsford Smith Oval - $400,000 for grandstand and amenities upgrades;

·    Tantallon Oval - $500,000 matching funding for the proposed grandstand upgrade works;

·    Amenities Building Upgrades - $50,000 is provided for amenities in Helen Street Reserve; and

·    Playground Upgrades - $150,000 is provided for priority playground equipment upgrades

 

Stormwater Management Charge

 

·    Council’s Infrastructure Levy was introduced in 2011/12 to address Council’s Infrastructure Maintenance Backlog;

·    A flood study of Council’s network has recently been completed and determined that 543,000m2 of land is subject to flooding during a 1 in 20 year storm;

·    To address the flooding 16km of larger capacity pipes are required;

·    Preliminary costs estimates indicate $20M is required to complete these upgrades;

·    Council is permitted to levy a Stormwater Management Charge, it is intended that 100% of the money raised will be used to address the flooding identified;

·    The Stormwater Management Charge is a fixed amount of $25 for Residential and Business properties, $12.50 for Residential Strata units; and

·    Based on these charges the Stormwater Management Charge would raise $297,700, an additional 25% over the existing Capital budget of $1.1M, reducing implementation of the solution from 24 years to 18 years.

 

 


 

Corporate Services

 

Customer Service

 

As a measure to enhance customer experiences a number of customer services initiatives are proposed for 2018/19 including investigating and implementing a management system, review out of hours phone services and establishment of rapid response teams.

 

Administration 1.1

 

Council will need to continue to contribute an additional $177,000 for staff who are in the Defined Benefits super fund in 2018/19. Superannuation estimates in individual accounts will vary throughout the budget depending on the number of staff in the scheme.

 

$61,500 is provided for Council’s Internal Audit program, which is a shared resource with other Northern Sydney Councils, the program is now at full capacity with 2.5 auditors. External audit services are now provided by the Auditor General. $64,575 has been allowed for however it is envisaged that this fee may increase.

 

The NSROC contribution has increased by an incremental amount to $42,000. NSROC continues to play a vital regional advocacy role. Current NSROC projects include the regional waste strategy; regional ageing strategy; renewal energy project; and ongoing investigation of resource sharing opportunities such as shared learning and implementation of the NSROC sportsground strategy.

 

eNotices

 

In 2018/19 Council will continue to offer the opportunity to ratepayers to receive their rate notices via email through Bpay View and the ability to pay using Bpay or any of the other current payment options.

 

This is an opportunity to provide an e-presentment service for ratepayers without additional cost and with the benefits of reduced postage costs and convenience to rate payers.

 

Approx 1500 ratepayers signed up for the electronic delivery of rates notices in 2017/2018.

 

Organisation Development - Administration (Program 3.1)

 

Workers Compensation premiums are claims driven and are spread throughout.

 

Provision is made for training associated with the progression of staff through Council’s salary system and mandatory training for WHS purposes.

 

Council provides staff with ad-hoc access to an Employee Assistance Program, charges are in line with utilisation.

 

This program provides for uniforms, community consultation initiatives and the annual community satisfaction survey.

 

 

 

 

 


 

Environmental Services

 

Overall the Environmental Services Division is seeking to continue existing program initiatives for the 2018/19 budget year.

 

Strategic Planning (Programme 2.1)

 

The ongoing series of LEP and DCP amendments will continue, and a number of ad hoc special projects arise each year, including liaison with the Greater Sydney Commission and progressing St Leonards South Planning Proposal and DCP. Funding has been provided to develop DCP controls for the Lane Cove Village laneways which are undergoing redevelopment.

 

Development Control (Programme 6.2)

 

Major development applications in the St Leonards CBD and Multi Residential Unit Developments continue to work through the assessment system. With some ongoing legal matters drawing to a close, the legal budget is expected to reduce over time as the Local Planning Panel (LPP) determines contentious applications and Council development applications.

 

Environmental Health (Programme 6.3.1)

 

Council continues to undertake water quality monitoring and inspections for food shops, cooling towers, skin penetration and beautician services to ensure public health standards are maintained.

 

Regulatory Services (Programme 6.4)

 

Council will continue to focus on minimising graffiti, waste dumping and vandalism. Additionally, surveillance of major construction sites and adherence to conditions of consent will be a priority during 2018/19.

 

Household Garbage Collection (Programme 9.2)

 

Council will continue to implement its waste strategy and educational programs, which seek to increase diversion rates above 50%. The partnership with NSROC to develop a Regional Waste Disposal Strategy has seen reductions in waste disposal costs, which has allowed Council to keep 2018/19 Domestic Waste Charges in line with Rate Pegging.  Council has in conjunction with surrounding councils established a permanent dedicated ‘problem waste’ (paint, e-waste etc) collection centre in Artarmon.

 

Sustainability Levy (Programme 13)

 

Over 50 projects are likely to be funded during the 2018/19 budget year that will contribute to the economic, social and environmental sustainability of the Lane Cove community.

 


 

Human Services

 

The Olympic Pool and Grandstand both need to be replaced in the next two years. 2018/19 will see extensive work being undertaken in planning for the replacement including consultation and also preparation of detailed plans for the lodgement of a Development application.

 

The tender for the cleaning of Council buildings is now being prepared.  The start of 2018/19 will see the introduction of the new tender.

 

The NSW Department of Family and Community Services – Ageing, Disability and Home Care (ADHC) have given final notice that they are withdrawing the funding for the position of Aged and Disability Worker – 18 hours per week. This funding has been in place for approximately six years. The funding covered all of the salary for the worker plus approximately $28,000 for providing programs.  The funding has been withdrawn as the Ageing, Disability and Home Care (ADHC) section of FAC’s is being shutdown as the funds migrate to the NDIS program which provides funding directly to clients.  In the 2018/19 budget funds from Council have been made available to continue with this position and its programs.

 

Kindy Cove Child Care Centre   (Program 4.3.2)

 

Kindy Cove Child Care Centre is run as a business unit of Council.  The budget is developed in close cooperation with the Management Advisory Committee.  The fees have been increased by an amount of $6.00 per day for all age groups from July 1, 2018.

Community Services   (Programs 4.3.1, 4.3.3, 4.3.4, 4.3.5, and 5.5)

 

These programs include provision for services to youth, the aged and people with a disability, and community groups generally.

 

The Youth Services Program continues to provide high quality services to our residents including initiatives such as the school holiday program, continuing the Primary School Open days and the Youth Centre operating as a five day a week drop in service.

 

Shorefest, which is a regional youth music festival, will continue in 2018/19 and funds have been included in the budget to cover this event.

 

Funds have been included in the budget to continue to fund a diverse range of seniors programs such as Seniors Week; Seniors Concerts, regular seminars, HEART programme (Healthy Eating and Recreation Time for Seniors); the Boomers program; cooking for men and falls prevention programs. Council continues to support the Different Degrees Theatre Ensemble.

 

Communications and Cultural Events

 

Funds have been made available for the employment of a staff member to be responsible for communications including social media. Funding has been allocated to a range of cultural activities outlined in the current Cultural Plan.  Funds have again been allocated for signature events, such as the Lane Cove River, Festival by the River and Coffee Carnevale  that appeal to the broadest cross section of our community.

 

Council’s Love Where You Live Program will continue to be rolled out across Lane Cove in the next twelve months. Emphasis has also been given to providing Plaza events to ensure that the community continue to use the Plaza and to encourage our residents and visitors to shop locally.

 


 

Library and Information Services (Program 5.1)

 

The Library continues to provide a wide range of programs targeting all sectors of the Lane Cove community.

 

Funds have been provided to run the annual Literary Awards.

 

Funding has also been included to allow the Library to introduce online payments – for fines, reservations and bookings. Fees for PC use have been removed.

 

Facilities (Programs 4, 5 & 9)

 

Activities of the Facilities Branch are shown in programs where Council facilities appear.

 

The 2018/9 budget has provision for planning for the replacement of the Olympic Pool and for the Grandstand. 

 

Provision has also made for the introduction of new rates associated with a new cleaning contract for Council buildings.

 

Costs associated with the cleaning and maintenance of the Rosenthal Avenue toilets have been deleted following the demolition of the toilets in 2017.

 

 

Open Space and Urban Services

 

Open Space   (Programs 5.7.1 – 5.7.6)

 

During 2018/2019 a number of maintenance and capital improvements are planned for Council’s Open Space areas including parks, sporting grounds and water recreation.

 

Significant funds have been carried over to plan for, and construct a new active recreation area in the Mowbray Precinct, involving properties in Mindarie Street. Funds have also been provided to further upgrade the landscaping and walking tracks around Lane Cove.

 

Funds in the amount of $500,000 have been provided as matching funding for upgrades to the toilets, storage area, grandstand view deck and amenities at Tantallon Oval as part of the Community Building Partnerships program in conjunction with the Lane Cove Tigers and the Lane Cove Junior Rugby Union.  The allocation of these funds is subject to Council approval of the staging plan, with Stage 1 to include the toilets, storage, administration, Canteen/BBQ area and viewing deck.

 

Funding has also been provided for the upgrade of the Kingsford Smith Oval grandstand ($400,000) and the rotunda roof replacement at the Plaza.

 

Following audits of play equipment, benches and picnic tables in 2017-18, funding has been dedicated for the upgrade of two playgrounds.

 

Within the Bushland budget, funds have been allocated for the Volunteer Bushcare program as well as for the regular Bushland Management Program. The Bushland Program also has a number of continuing works that are funded by Grant allocations.

 


 

Engineering and Support Services (Program 8.1)

 

Further work will be undertaken on the strategic traffic and transport studies for St Leonards as required due to new development. Other works planned include detailed design work for the proposed Burns Bay Road/ Coxs Lane/ Tambourine Bay Road signalisation.

 

 

Roads (Program 8.2)

 

The Roads program funding is in line with Council’s Asset Management System Works Program.

 

Council has received some RMS funding for the Regional Roads Rehabilitation Program.

 

Ancillary Works (Program 8.3)

 

Income from reinstatements/restorations has been maintained to reflect an expected continuance of a similar amount of work by the Council works staff. 

 

Funding for street lighting expenditure has been based on the latest Ausgrid fee structure. Energy costs will gradually decrease once the lighting upgrade work is fully completed. .

 

Council’s bicycle funding will remain at $150,000 to allow continued implementation of Council’s Bicycle Plan.

 

Funds have been allocated for bushland regeneration in the vicinity of 15 Centennial Avenue and along the creek in Blackman Park.

 

Planning and design work for Council’s St Leonards Bus Rail Interchange and Plaza will commence including the appointment of a project manager.

 

Footpaths (Program 8.4)

 

Funding has been maintained to continue our footpath maintenance program. Provision has been made for continuing upgrade works including the provision of pram ramps at numerous key locations. Asset renewal in the footpaths program also matches Council’s commitment to increase asset renewal rates to the equivalent of depreciation.

 

Bus Shelters (Program 8.6)

 

A new bus shelter contract will commence in July 2018.

 

Water Transport (Program 8.7)

 

Cleaning maintenance will be carried out as part of an ongoing agreement with Maritime NSW, who have taken over responsibility for general maintenance and upgrades/major repairs to the ferry wharves within the Lane Cove LGA (and other Council areas adjoining the harbour).

 

Street Sweeping (Program 9.3)

 

Funding has been maintained for hand sweeping to maintain Council’s current level of service

 


 

Other Garbage Expenses (Program 9.4)

 

The contract for servicing of litter bins has been included with the contract for domestic waste collection.  The allocation makes allowance for increased tipping fees.

 

Other Community Facilities (Program 9.7)

 

Provision has been made for increased maintenance to appropriately maintain the newly constructed Little Street Car Park and Lane Cove Plaza.

 

Sustainability Levy

 

This year Council continues to fast track Sustainability initiatives utilising the 6% Sustainability Levy. Projects for 2018/19 include:

·    Environmental education

·    Bush Kids

·    The Backyard Habitat Program

·    Move More in March

·    Public Art Initiatives

·    Love Where You Live Lane Cove

·    Sustainable Building Advisory Program

·    Street Lighting LED Program

·    Cooling Tower replacement

 

Budget Revenues

 

Rates Levy

 

The Minister for Local Government has announced the general rate peg increase as 2.3% for 2018/19.

 

General Purpose (Ordinary) Rates

 

It is proposed to levy two (2) Ordinary Rates in 2018/19 in accordance with S.492 and S.497(a) of the Local Government Act.

 

i.  An Ordinary Residential Rate of  0.116571 cents in the dollar, on the Land Value of all Rateable Land categorised as Residential in accordance with S.516 of the Local Government Act, (with the exception of heritage properties which are rated on their heritage value), with a Minimum Rate of $867, to yield $18,361,556.

 

ii. An Ordinary Business Rate of $0.635051 cents in the dollar, on the Land Value of all Rateable Land categorised as Business in accordance with S.516 of the Local Government Act, with a Minimum Rate of $886 to yield $5,410,429.

 

Car Parking Special Rate

 

It is proposed to levy a Car Parking Special Rate on Business premises in Lane Cove of 0.199654 cents in dollar with a minimum rate of $2 per assessment, to raise $164,538.

 


 

Domestic Waste Management (DWM) Charges

 

Domestic Waste Management Services are rendered by Council to all residential properties (including flats and strata’s) in the Lane Cove Municipality. DWM does not include waste services rendered to business rated properties. As provided for in the Local Government Act, the “reasonable” cost of DWM is fully recoverable and is reflected in the recommended charge for Domestic Waste Management in the Operational Plan. Fees for 2018/19 will remain in line with the rate pay.

 

The Draft Budget provides for the levying of a Domestic Waste Management Charge (under S.496 of the Act) of $435.00 for each 80 litre MGB and recycling service on all rateable and non-rateable residential properties. Additional DWM services to Owner Occupied Single Residential Dwellings are available at $6.40 per week. Charges for DWM services rendered to residential units above business premises, or extra DWM services rendered to other premises, are set out in the Schedule of Fees and Charges for 2018/2019.

 

Stormwater Levy

 

It is proposed to levy a stormwater levy of $25 per residential or business property and $12.50 per residential strata unit. The levy is proposed to raise $297,700.

 

Interest Charges

 

Interest is to be charged on overdue Rates and DWM Charges in accordance with S.566(3) of the Act. The maximum rate of interest payable has not yet been announced by the Minister for 2018/2019.

 

Valuation Base

 

Rates for 2018/2019 will be levied on the 1 July 2016 Base Date Valuations as issued by the Valuer General.

 

Fees & Charges

 

The Reserve Bank of Australia inflation forecast for the ensuing year is 2% whilst wages and salaries are anticipated to grow by 2.5% over the coming year. These have been used as a reference for any recommended increases in the Schedule of Fees and Charges for 2018/2019 (AT-2) for those charges which are set by Council.

 

S.611 Charges – Infrastructure Charges

 

Council is proposing to levy under S611 of the Local Government Act, on persons for the time being in possession, occupation or enjoyment of a rail, pipe, wire, pole, cable, tunnel or structure laid, erected, suspended, constructed or placed on, under or over a public place. The charges are based on the nature and extent of the benefit enjoyed by the person concerned. Council will levy a charge on AGL in respect of gas pipes occupying Council land.

 

Loan Borrowing


It is not proposed to raise any new loans. There are no renewal loans requiring refinancing during this period.

 


 

Salaries and Wages

 

Salaries and Wages include provision for staff progression through Council's revised Salary System and a 2.5% award increase from 1 July 2018. All other provisions are as per the Local 2018 Government (State) Award. Sick leave has been based on 50% of leave entitlement and on sick leave history.

 

Depreciation Charges

 

In accordance with the requirements of Australian Accounting Standard AAS27, the Draft Budget incorporates depreciation of fixed assets. Depreciation theoretically is the consumption of these   assets over their useful life. Amounts are provided each year to reflect this consumption and do not involve the movement of cash.

 

Community Strategic Plan, Lane Cove 2035 and Draft Delivery Program 2018-2021 and Operational Plan 2018-2019

 

All NSW councils are required to have in place the following planning processes:-

•          A community strategic plan;

•          A community engagement strategy that sets out how each council will engage its community when developing its community strategic plan;

•          A resourcing strategy that includes a long term financial plan, a workforce management strategy and an asset management policy, strategy and plans;

•          A delivery program; and

•          An Operational Plan, including a statement of revenue policy, and a detailed annual budget.




 

Community Strategic Plan, Lane Cove 2035

The Community Strategic Plan, Lane Cove 2025 was adopted in 2011 and outlines the vision for the local community and Council. Lane Cove 2025 was produced after an extensive two year community consultation process.  As per Section 402 of the Local Government 1993, a review of the Plan was undertaken in 2013.  Council is now in the process of preparing ‘Liveable Lane Cove, 2035’ a new Community Strategic Plan (CSP) that will guide us to 2035.

 

Over the last four months Council has carried out a number of engagement workshops with community, councillors and council staff.  During these discussions we’ve heard many thoughts and ideas about the future of Lane Cove, about what’s important to our community and what our priorities should be as we move towards 2035.  

 

The community has told us about the issues most important to them and to the future of Lane Cove, such as:

·      Protecting our local open space and bushland

·      Improving public transport services

·      Managing urban growth and density with care

·      Preserving our clean waterways

·      Ensuring our community feels connected and involved in community life

·      Enhancing community safety on our streets and in our public spaces

·      Expanding choices for healthy and active lifestyles within our community

·      Creating opportunities for active community involvement in shaping the future of Lane Cove

The feedback and ideas received across our six peak themes of the CSP has been used to refine the core of the plan, being the long term goals and objectives and the strategies to achieve them.  The Draft Community Strategic Plan ‘Liveable Lane Cove, 2035’ is attached at AT-3.

 

It is proposed that further consultation be carried out on the Draft Community Strategic Plan in accordance with the community engagement strategy adopted by council on 11 December 2017.  This includes a deliberative poll, survey, enewsletter, further community workshops, plaza stalls and public and website exhibitions.

 

Delivery Program and Operational Plan

 

The 2018-21 Draft Delivery Program and Operational Plan, shown attached as AT-4, outlines the actions to be implemented over the coming years in order to achieve the goals, objectives and strategies of the Community Strategic Plan.

 

Community Consultation

 

It is a statutory requirement that the Draft Budget 2018-2019, Delivery Program (Incorporating Operational Plan) 2018-2021 and Fees and Charges 2018-2019, following Council’s initial consideration, be placed on public exhibition for a period of not less than twenty eight (28) days. Following this, Council must consider any public comments submitted before the Plans can be adopted.

 

It is proposed to exhibit these documents for six (6) weeks from late April 2018 to the end of May 2018. A report will be prepared for Council’s consideration at the June Ordinary Council Meeting advising of the results of the community consultation and recommending final adoption. Until the Delivery Program is adopted, Council is unable to levy rates and charges for the fiscal year for which the plan is prepared.

 

Consultation Statement of Intent

 

The consultation is designed to provide the community with the opportunity to comment on the proposed initiatives and actions over the next year

 

The methods of consultation proposed are outlined below. The proposed exhibition will be at both the Civic Centre and the Library to final confirmation. 

 

Methods

 

Level of Participation

Inform

Consult

Form of Participation

Open

Open

Target Audience

Whole Community

Whole Community

Proposed Medium

Public and Website Exhibitions / Advertising / eNewsletter

Survey

Indicative Timing

April – May 2018

April – May 2018

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

1.       Council adopt for the purpose of public exhibition, the Draft Community Strategic Plan, Liveable Lane Cove 2035, the 2018-2019 Draft Budget and Draft Fees and Charges and the Draft  Delivery Program (Incorporating Operational Plan) 2018-21;

2.       Council undertake community consultation for a period of six (6) weeks as per the consultation strategy outlined in the report; and

3.       Following public exhibition, the Draft Community Strategic Plan, Liveable Lane Cove 2035, the 2018-2019 Draft Budget and Draft Fees and Charges and the Draft Delivery Program (Incorporating Operational Plan) 2018-2, together with a report on any submissions received, be considered at the Council meeting to be held 18 June 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 


 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

2018-19 Draft Budget

 

Available Electronically

AT‑2View

2018-19 Draft Fees and Charges

24 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑3View

Draft Community Strategic Plan - Liveable Lane Cove  |  2035

64 Pages

 

AT‑4View

Draft Delivery Program and Operational Plan 2018-2021

121 Pages

Available Electronically

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 April 2018

March 2018 Traffic Committee Meeting

 

 

Subject:          March 2018 Traffic Committee Meeting    

Record No:    SU1326 - 20305/18

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Santosh Rai 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The Lane Cove Traffic Committee Meeting was held on Tuesday, 20 March 2018. The Agenda is included as AT-1. The Traffic Committee recommendations are shown in the Minutes of the Meeting, included as AT-2.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council adopts the recommendations of the Lane Cove Traffic Committee Meeting held on Tuesday, 20 March 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Terescenko

Executive Manager - Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

AGENDA - Traffic Committee - March 2018

20 Pages

 

AT‑2View

MINUTES - Traffic Committee - March 2018

15 Pages

 

 

  


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 April 2018

Street Libraries in Lane Cove

 

 

Subject:          Street Libraries in Lane Cove    

Record No:    SU6940 - 20257/18

Division:         Human Services Division

Author(s):      Corinne Hitchenson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

As part of Council’s Love Where You Live program, two Street Libraries have been installed to encourage the community to exchange and borrow books with their neighbours. Two young local artists were commissioned to paint original artworks on the libraries which are now available for the community to enjoy at Yorks Corner, Riverview and Helen Street Reserve, Lane Cove North.

 

Background

 

A Street Library is a box or small assortment of shelves filled with books that are made accessible to the public with no associated fees or memberships. Most libraries are shaped like mini wooden houses and are often located within community parks, streets and shopping precincts. Members of the public can donate, borrow or swap any book housed in one of the Libraries.

 

The not-for-profit Street Library group officially began in Sydney, New South Wales in November 2015 and today the locations of over 500 libraries are included on their website.

 

Discussion

 

Council has initiated the installation of two Street Libraries in trial locations at Yorks Corner, Riverview and Helen Street Reserve, Lane Cove North. There is also an existing resident-led Library located in Longueville.

 

Council purchased two libraries through the Street Library program resulting in the libraries being registered on the wider network of some 40 libraries located within the Northern Sydney area: www.streetlibrary.org.au.

 

Two young Lane Cove artists, Maya Cheesman and Isabelle Shepherd were commissioned to paint original artworks on the libraries resulting in a colourful and creative home for books donated by the community. The artist statements and library locations have been included on Council’s Streetside Gallery website: www.lanecove.nsw.gov.au/streetsidegallery.

 

  

 

Lane Cove Library has also donated books to help kick-start the collections and both libraries contain Council’s Love Where You Read Lane Cove branding.

 

Council staff will monitor the success of the libraries in these two locations and consider future locations or arrangements based on how these libraries are used within the community.

 

Conclusion

 

Two (2)  bright and colourful street libraries are now installed in Lane Cove for the community to enjoy.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Gornall

Executive Manager - Human Services

Human Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 April 2018

NSROC Regional Sportsground Strategy

 

 

Subject:          NSROC Regional Sportsground Strategy    

Record No:    SU3617 - 14352/18

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Ted Webster; Martin Terescenko 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

NSROC has reviewed the Regional Sports ground Management Strategy 2011 and quantified a current and future shortfall in the supply and capacity of sports grounds.  The NSROC Board endorsed the Report at its meeting on 22 February 2018. The Report was launched by the NSROC President on 27 March 2018. It is recommended that Council endorse this strategy.

 

Background

 

The 2011 NSROC Regional Sports ground Management Strategy was due for review. It outlined a co-operative approach to the key challenges facing local governments in the region in managing demand for sports facilities.

 

Population growth is expected to impact demand for sports grounds in the NSROC region. Representative organisations for community sports already reported inadequate availability of sports grounds for playing and training.

 

The likely implication of the growth forecasts for each Council is that greater pressure will be placed on community facilities including sports grounds.

 

The Review Report was completed in late December 2017. It has quantified and demonstrated a current and future shortfall in the supply and capacity of sports grounds:-

 

·    An increase in supply/capacity of 26% will be needed by the year 2026 (equivalent to approximately 78 standard rectangular fields) and 40% will be needed by the year 2036 (equivalent to approximately 120 standard rectangular fields).

 

A range of actions have been identified to increase the supply and capacity of sports grounds. These include more synthetic fields, lighting and new and increased use of school facilities.

 

Some of the recommended actions for the NSW Government, include:-

·    Sport be incorporated into active healthy living and ‘liveability’ measures;

·    Sports grounds and open space be provided as essential infrastructure;

·    Planning to ensure delivery of spaces that are not compromised by other outcomes; and

·    Provision of  new or upgraded community sport facilities to meet the population growth.

 

The Sports Professional Officers Group will assist with monitoring the implementation of the recommended actions, and NSROC will work with the NSW Government to seek support to help address the shortfall in the supply and capacity of sports grounds in the region.

Discussion

 

With the current increase in population growth, there exists a real need to review the current sports ground strategies and initiatives that are currently in practice. The current strategy needs to be adapted where necessary to facilitate a more efficient delivery of increased sports grounds as well as the capacity to deliver more playing times to existing sporting facilities.

 

Some of the longer term initiatives that would need to be a joint venture between State and Local Government organisations could include:-

1.   Facilitating the security and acquisition of land;

2.   Leading and facilitating development of sport areas in high density zones; and

3.   Funding or facilitation of funding for high capital cost infrastructure that significantly increases the supply / capacity of sport grounds to meet future demand.

 

Some of the shorter term initiatives (within 5 years) that could be achieved by Local Government organisations could include:-

·    Working with sport to develop and implement game formats and programs to create more ‘yield’ (intensity of use);

·    Investigate conversion and/or co-use of other spaces (e.g. golf courses, bowling greens, schools) for sporting activities;

·    Installing or upgrading lighting;

·    Reconfiguring playing fields to improve functionality;

·    Upgrading drainage and/ or surface quality;

·    Installing additional multi-purpose synthetic surfaces or special purpose surfaces;

·    Ensuring provision of active open space land in new residential developments;

·    Acquiring or securing other land for sports grounds;

·    Partnering with schools and/ or other institutions to use existing or develop new facilities;

·    Consideration of new technology;

·    Ensuring the sports ground allocation process effectively balances maximising use with equity of access; and

·    Continuing to improve field maintenance and management practice.

 

Possible impacts that may occur without effective change could include:-

1.   A lack of space/access will lead to increasing numbers of participants being turned away from sport

a.   Decreasing physical inactivity, sedentary leisure behavior and related health and disease impacts; and

b.   Reducing benefits brought about by participation in sport and physical activity;

2.   Increase costs to participate and accessibility of facilities will create inequity in participants and associated benefits; and

3.   Access to sport may become based on the capacity to pay and which may create a greater barrier to participation for lower income households.

 


 

 

Council’s Role in Sport

 

Council’s primary roles in sport are strategic planning, provision and management of sports infrastructure and supporting clubs and opportunities for participants. Council’s emphasis will be on community sport, recognising the importance of providing pathways to all levels of competition.

 

Conclusion

 

Council must review and revise our current Sportsground strategy and implement whatever initiatives with the current staff, infrastructure and land areas available to increase our capacity in the short term while staying up to date and stay involved with Regional and State initiatives to increasing our available sports grounds well into the future.

 

In regard to these short term objectives, Council is currently developing plans for a new synthetic sports field at Bob Campbell Oval and working with the NSW Department of Education to provide a synthetic playing field at Greenwich Public School. These two initiatives will enable increased capacity within our current sports field stock.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

1.       Receive the Report; and

2.       Adopt the NSROC Sports ground Strategy Review report dated December 2017, shown attached as AT-1

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Terescenko

Executive Manager - Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

NSROC Sportsground Strategy Review Full Report (Dec 2017)

87 Pages

Available Electronically

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 April 2018

Council Snapshot

 

 

Subject:          Council Snapshot    

Record No:    SU220 - 18950/18

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):      Craig Wrightson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Attached for the information of Councillors is a review of Council’s recent activities.  This report provides a summary of the operations of each Division for March 2018.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Council Snapshot

39 Pages

 

 

          

 



[1] NSW Affordable Housing Ministerial Guidelines, 2017-18.NSW Family and Community Services.

[2] NSW income limits are derived from median income figures for Sydney, NRAS limits are based on national median figures.

[3] Key worker housing affordability in Sydney, University of Sydney and the Urban Housing Lab, January 2018

[4] Greater Sydney Regional Plan, March 2018