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Agenda

Ordinary Council Meeting

11 December 2017

The meeting commences at 6.30pm. If members of the public are

not interested in any business recommended to be considered in

Closed Session or there is no such business, Council will ordinarily

  commence consideration of all other business at 7pm.

 

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Notice of Meeting

 

Dear Councillors

 

Notice is given of the Ordinary Council Meeting, to be held in the Council Chambers, 48 Longueville Road Lane Cove on Monday 11 December 2017 commencing at 7:00pm. The business to be transacted at the meeting is included in this business paper.

 

Craig - GMYours faithfully

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

 

Council Meeting Procedures

 

The Council meeting is chaired by the Mayor, Councillor Pam Palmer. Councillors are entitled to one vote on a matter. If votes are equal, the Chairperson has a second or casting vote. When a majority of Councillors vote in favour of a Motion it becomes a decision of the Council. Minutes of Council and Committee meetings are published on Council’s website www.lanecove.nsw.gov.au by 5pm on the Thursday following the meeting.

 

The Meeting is conducted in accordance with Council's Code of Meeting Practice. The order of business is listed in the Agenda on the next page. That order will be followed unless Council resolves to modify the order at the meeting. This may occur for example where the members of the public in attendance are interested in specific items on the agenda.

 

Members of the public may address the Council Meeting on any issue for a maximum of 3 minutes during the public forum which is held at the beginning of the meeting. All persons addressing the Meeting must speak to the Chair. Speakers and Councillors will not enter into general debate or ask questions.

 

If you do not understand any part of the information given above; require assistance to participate in the meeting due to a disability; or wish to obtain information in relation to Council, please contact Council’s Executive Manager – Corporate Services on 99113550.

 

Please note meetings held in the Council Chambers are recorded on tape for the purposes of verifying the accuracy of minutes and the tapes are not disclosed to any third party under the Government Information (Public Access)  Act 2009, except as allowed under section 18(1) or section 19(1) of the PPIP Act, or where Council is compelled to do so by court order, warrant or subpoena or by any other legislation.

 

 

 


Ordinary Council 11 December 2017

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

APOLOGIES

 

OPENING OF MEETING WITH PRAYER

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT TO COUNTRY

 

NOTICE OF WEBCASTING OF MEETING

 

public forum

 

Members of the public may address the Council Meeting on any issue for 3 minutes.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

 

1.      ORDINARY COUNCIL MEETING - 20 NOVEMBER 2017

 

Orders Of The Day

 

Notices of Motion

 

2.       Notice of Motion - Refugee Welcome Zone

 

Officer Reports for Determination

 

3.       RMS Proposed Clearways and Intersection Workson - Centennial Avenue

 

4.       November 2017 Traffic Committee Meeting

 

5.       Proposed Road Closure, Southern End of Pinaroo Place, Lane Cove

 

6.       Streetlighting LED Accelerated Program

 

7.       Changes to Independent Hearing and Assessment Panels

 

8.       Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove: 2018 - 2023

 

9.       Sustainability Levy - Small Grants - Round 14

 

10.     Revised Draft North District Plan

 

11.     Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan

 

12.     Review of Community Strategic Plan - Lane Cove 2025 and Community Engagement Strategy

 

13.     1st Quarter Review of the 2017-2018 Delivery Program and Operational Plan

 

14.     Council Meeting Schedule - 2018

 

Officer Reports for Information

 

15.     2016 Census Update

 

16.     Keep NSW Beautiful Blue Star Awards - Waste Less Recycle More

 

17.     Lane Cove Plaza 40th Anniversary

 

18.     Amendments to the Environmental Planning and Assessment  Act 2017

 

19.     Dockless Bike Share Schemes

 

20.     Community Wellbeing Survey 2017  

 

 

 

 

                   


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 11 December 2017

Notice of Motion - Refugee Welcome Zone

 

 

Subject:          Notice of Motion - Refugee Welcome Zone    

Record No:    SU2398 - 72812/17

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):      Councillor Andrew Zbik 

 

 

 

Background

 

The Refugee Council of Australia (RCOA) is the national peak body for refugees and the organisations and individuals who support them. RCOA promotes the adoption of flexible, humane and constructive policies towards refugees and asylum seekers through conducting policy analysis, research, advocacy and public education on refugee issues. Further information on RCOA is at AT-1.

 

A Refugee Welcome Zone is a Local Government Area which has made a commitment in spirit to welcoming men, women and children who have moved to Australia from countries that have suffered war, civil conflict, religious persecution, political persecution or other unfortunate circumstances. The pledge states that we as a community in Lane Cove will welcome these people into our community, upholding their human rights, demonstrating compassion and enhancing cultural and religious diversity in the community. Many community groups and local residents in Lane Cove volunteer a considerable amount of time and donate a substantial amount of money towards supporting these people who are now making Australia their home. 

 

The Refugee Welcome Zone initiative began in June 2002 as part of Refugee Week celebrations. More than 148 Local Government Areas have declared themselves Refugee Welcome Zones. Neighbouring Local Government Areas including Hornsby Shire Council, Ku-Ring-Gai Council, Mosman Council, North Sydney Council, Northern Beaches Council (Formally Mosman, Warringah and Pittwater Councils), City of Ryde and Willoughby Council have already signed the pledge. A copy of The Refugee Welcome Zone Declaration is at AT-2. Lane Cove Council is one of the few Councils in New South Wales yet to consider signing the pledge.

 

By signing this pledge, Lane Cove Council would be sending a clear message to members of our community that we will support people who are now making Australia their home and that we welcome them to participate in our community. It will also recognise the effort many residents in our community have undertaken to work with people in our community and other parts of Sydney who are now making Australia their home. 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

 

1.    Sign the pledge provided by the Refugee Council of Australia to become a Refugee Welcome Zone; 

 

2.    Demonstrate our commitment to the pledge by helping to organise and coordinate with local community groups already working with refugees to hold an event or a series of events during Refugee Week (17-23 June 2018). The objective of the events would be to help educate and raise awareness around the challenges people who have recently arrived in Australia face when settling into our community and celebrate the contribution they have made to Australian society and

 

3.   Develop a work experience position at Lane Cove Council for a student who has recently arrived in Australia. The objective of the position would be to help them to develop the literacy and numeracy skills to help them give back to the Lane Cove community and to help build their skill set to prepare them for gainful employment in the private or public sectors. 

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor Andrew Zbik

Councillor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Information Material - Refugee Council of Australia

3 Pages

 

AT‑2View

The Refugee Welcome Zone Declaration

1 Page

 

 

   


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 11 December 2017

RMS Proposed Clearways and Intersection Workson - Centennial Avenue

 

 

Subject:          RMS Proposed Clearways and Intersection Workson - Centennial Avenue    

Record No:    SU1326 - 73033/17

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Sashika Perera 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The NSW Government is currently rolling out its Pinch Point Program which aims to improve traffic congestion points at which bottlenecks occur. The NSW Government is also rolling out a  Clearways Program which introduces parking restrictions during peak times along busy road corridors to improve congestion on the road network.

 

This report outlines the proposals affecting the Lane Cove Local Government Area (LGA) and raises concern about the lack of information and short consultation period to adequately assess the proposals. It is recommended Council request an extension of the consultation until the end of January, 2018 and further information be provided on the proposals including justification for the changes.

 

Background

 

As part of the above mentioned programs, RMS is proposing intersection improvements at the Epping Road/Centennial Avenue intersection by widening and changing the lane configuration on both Centennial Avenue and Epping Road.

 

In addition to the intersection improvements, RMS is also introducing new weekday, weekend and public holiday clearways on Centennial Avenue and Burns Bay Road from Epping Road, Lane Cove to Victoria Road, Huntleys Point.

 

Discussion

 

Clearways Program

 

In May 2017, RMS staff of the Clearways Program outlined Sydney’s overall Clearways Strategy and provided an initial confidential briefing to staff on the proposed clearways in the LGA being:-

 

·    Pacific Highway from Fullers Road, Chatswood to Gore Hill Freeway, Artarmon (extension of existing clearway operation hours)

·    Centennial Avenue and Burns Bay Road from Epping Road, Lane Cove to Victoria Road, Huntleys Point.

 

At the time, the proposed clearway operation hours were being developed and no community consultation dates were outlined.

 

Council became aware of the current RMS community consultation when members of the community advised that they received an RMS consultation pamphlet over the weekend of 2-3 December, 2018 which indicates the consultation closes 15 December, 2017. Council subsequently received formal advice on the 7 December 2017. A copy of the RMS consultation pamphlet is included at AT-1. Given the long planning period for the proposal, the two week consultation period is considered short. To allow the Council to better understand the scheme, Council requested the RMS attend the Council Meeting to outline it, and the RMS have agreed and will be in attendance at 7pm at the Council meeting.

The new clearway hours (in both directions) on Centennial Avenue and Burns Bay Road (between Epping Road and Penrose Street) are 6am to 10am and 3pm to 7pm on weekdays and 9am to 6pm on weekends and public holidays.

 

The new clearway hours (in both directions) on Burns Bay Road (between Penrose Street and Victoria Road, Huntleys Point) are 6am to 7pm on weekdays and 9am to 6pm weekends and public holidays.

 

Pinch Point Program

 

On 29 September 2017, Council Officers met with Project Managers of the RMS Pinch Point Program for initial discussions on their proposed changes to the Epping Road/Centennial Avenue intersection. The proposal is to add a longer left turn slip lane in Centennial Avenue north bound.

 

RMS Project Managers had minimal information on the proposal at the time and therefore Council Officers requested the following information:-

 

·    The  extent of encroachment to park;

·    The number of trees affected and its exact locations; and

·    Any prior surveys that were undertaken to support the project i.e. queue length surveys etc.

 

Council staff also raised the following:-

 

·    The incorporation of a proposed cycleway along Centennial Avenue; and

·    What RMS can offer to the community in terms of park improvements.

 

RMS made no mention of community consultation dates at the time of the meeting.

 

On 15 November 2017, the RMS sent through a plan indicating the trees that would be removed and impacted by the proposal. The plan is included as AT-2.

 

On 20 November 2017, the RMS formally requested Council provided comment (due by 11 December 2017) which coincides with the community consultation period. Again, given the long planning period for the proposal, the two week consultation period is considered short. This proposal will also be outlined by the RMS staff attending the Council Meeting.

 

Conclusion

 

The current RMS proposals will have significant impacts and the RMS should provide the community and Council with adequate time to assess and comment on RMS proposals prior to community consultation being undertaken. Given the time of year, it is recommended that Council request the RMS to extend the consultation until the end of January, 2017 to provide time for a thorough assessment of the proposals.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council request RMS to:-

 

1.   Provide justification for the proposed clearway operation hours on Centennial Avenue and Burns Bay Road between Epping Road, Lane Cove and Victoria Road, Huntleys Point;

 

2.   Provide justification for the loss of open space by adding a longer left turn slip lane in Centennial Avenue north bound; and

 

3.   Extend the community consultation period until 31 January 2018, considering the Christmas holiday period.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Terescenko

Executive Manager - Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

RMS consultation pamphlet

4 Pages

 

AT‑2View

Land Acquisition Plan

2 Pages

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 11 December 2017

November 2017 Traffic Committee Meeting

 

 

Subject:          November 2017 Traffic Committee Meeting    

Record No:    SU1326 - 72040/17

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Santosh Rai 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The Lane Cove Traffic Committee Meeting was held on Tuesday, 14 November 2017. The Agenda is included as AT-1. The Traffic Committee recommendations are shown in the Minutes of the Meeting, included as AT-2.

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council adopts the recommendations of the Lane Cove Traffic Committee Meeting held on Tuesday, 14 November 2017.

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Terescenko

Executive Manager - Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

AGENDA - Traffic Committee - November 2017

12 Pages

 

AT‑2View

MINUTES - Traffic Committee - November 2017

12 Pages

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 11 December 2017

Proposed Road Closure, Southern End of Pinaroo Place, Lane Cove

 

 

Subject:          Proposed Road Closure, Southern End of Pinaroo Place, Lane Cove     

Record No:    SU6839 - 72645/17

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Craig Dalli 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report outlines the results of the public notification to close part of the public road known as the southern end of Pinaroo Place, Lane Cove.

                                 

Upon closure, Council intends to incorporate the southern end of Pinaroo Place with six properties acquired from the NSW Government to allow the expansion of the existing park at the corner of Kullah Parade and Mindarie Street to create a single large park of approximately 6,300sqm.

 

The report will recommend that Council make a formal application to the Department of Primary Industries – Lands, to formally close the Southern End of Pinaroo Place, Lane Cove.

 

Background

 

Following consideration of a report to the Ordinary Meeting on 21 August 2017 in respect of the proposed park design for Pinaroo Place, Council resolved in part that:-

1.   Public notification commence to close part of the southern end of Pinaroo Place, namely the existing cul-de-sac, as outlined in AT-4, in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding dated April 2006 with the NSW Department of Primary Industry-Lands; and

2.   Following public consultation, receive a further report outlining the submissions received with respect to the proposed partial road closure and for determining whether to proceed with an application to NSW Department of Primary Industry-Lands.

 

The road closure proposal is illustrated below:-

Public Notification

 

The proposed road closure was advertised in the North Shore Times on 28 September 2017 allowing for a period of 28 days for submissions.

 

Additionally, residents located in the vicinity of the site were notified by letterbox drop as well as signs located on site. Further, as required by the NSW Department of Primary Industries-Lands, the following authorities were also notified of the proposal:

 

·    Transgrid;

·    Ausgrid;

·    Essential Energy;

·    Endeavour Energy;

·    APA Group;

·    Jemena Asset Management;

·    Sydney Water;

·    Roads and Maritime Services;

·    Office of Environment and Heritage;

·    NSW Planning and Environment;

·    Local Fire Service (Metropolitan and/or Rural Fire Service);

·    NSW Rural Fire Service Headquarters;

·    NSW Forestry Corporation;

·    NSW Resources & Energy, NSW Department of Industry Division of Resources & Energy;

·    NSW Fishing & Aquaculture; and

·    NSW Department of Industry - Lands

 

Responses

 

As a result of the public notification of the proposal, four (4) submissions were received, two (2) being from public authorities and two (2) from residents. However, no submissions raising objections or concerns have been received. Responses are outlined below.

 

Public Authorities

Response - Office of Environment and Heritage

 

By email dated 20 November 2017, advising they have no objection to the proposed road closure. 

 

Response - APA Transmissions

 

By email dated 21 November 2017, advising they have no objection to the proposed road closure. 

 


 

Discussion – Public Utilities

 

Whilst certain services are currently located within sections of the proposed road closure area which is to be incorporated within the public park, subject to the final park design, Council may have to relocate the affected services in conjunction with the relevant public authority.  

 

Private submissions

 

As noted above, two (2) submissions were received from members of the public; one in regard to parking unrelated to the proposed road closure and the second assumed the road was a thoroughfare which is not the case.

 

Conclusion

 

As no relevant objections have been received from relevant authorities, and acknowledging that some public authority services may need to be relocated with the final design of the park, it is considered that there are no valid reasons not to proceed with the proposal.

 

It is recommended that Council lodge an application to the Department of Industry – Lands to formally close the road.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

 

1.         Note that following public notification in the North Shore Times and by letters to relevant stakeholders, no valid objections were received to the proposed closure of the southern end of Pinaroo Place, Lane Cove; and

2.         Make application to the Department of Primary Industries – Lands to formally close as public road the southern end of Pinaroo Place, Lane Cove as illustrated in this report

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 11 December 2017

Streetlighting LED Accelerated Program

 

 

Subject:          Streetlighting LED Accelerated Program    

Record No:    SU5881 - 71600/17

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Sashika Perera 

 

 

Summary

 

This report provides details of Ausgrid’s proposed program to replace 1184 Ausgrid street lights on residential roads within Council’s Local Government Area with energy efficient LED’s over the next three years. It is recommended that Council accept Ausgrid’s proposal for the accelerated replacement of 1184 Ausgrid lights on residential roads over the next three (3) years, funded through Council’s Sustainability Levy.

 

Background

 

Ausgrid owns and maintains 2600 street lights within Lane Cove’s LGA which Council pays for. These lights include 1184 pre-2009 lights on residential streets that can be cost-effectively replaced by newer, more efficient and more reliable LEDs.  Post 2009 compact fluorescent lights were installed and are considered reasonably energy efficient and therefore not economic to replace at this time.

With the support of Council, Ausgrid is proposing to replace all of these lights as part of a large ‘Lighting the Way’ program that aims to deploy up to 102,000 LEDs on residential roads across 33 councils, replacing all fifteen remaining types of pre-2009 roadway luminaires (excludes decorative and main road lighting at this stage).  A few post-2009 luminaires that are considered obsolete are also included in the proposed replacement program.

The only types of standard street lighting that would be present on residential roads if this proposal is fully implemented are compact fluorescent lights and LEDs (considered highly energy efficient and installed from 2009 onwards).

 

Discussion

 

Ausgrid and the SSROC Street Lighting Improvement Program (of which Council is a member along with 29 other councils) have worked jointly for over six (6) months on a detailed business case for each council and for the project as a whole.  The business case for Council is strongly positive with a net present value of up to $118,210 when Council funds are used to fund the initial investment required of $508,139. Based on current costs, as advised by SSROC’s consultant, the annual energy and annual maintenance cost savings will provide a payback term over the project of approximately 5.19 years.

 

Compared to the mixed portfolio of legacy lighting being replaced, the new LED lighting will:-

1.    Provide the community with more effective lighting that is better distributed in the road reserve, is a high quality white light and, in many cases, will substantially improve compliance outcomes.  Importantly, since 2013 Ausgrid has successfully deployed more than 33,000 LED lights.  Ausgrid’s LED deployments to date have had widespread acceptance and very low numbers of public complaints.  They have has also recently introduced lighting options for narrow roads and shielding options to better address any resident complaints that may arise;

2.    Deliver environmental benefits including a 79 % reduction in greenhouse gas emissions (a total GHG saving of 339.2 t/CO2-e/yr), significantly reduced light pollution to the night sky and the elimination of mercury-containing lamps; and

3.    Deliver cost savings for councils over at least the next ten (10) years from a combination of a 79% reduction in energy consumption compared to the lights being replaced (a total energy saving of almost 357 MWhr/yr), lower maintenance costs, and a lower cost of capital.

 

Financial Implications

 

It is proposed to fund the program from Council’s Sustainability Levy over the next three (3) years commencing 2018/19, which is an annual contribution of approximately $170,000.  This would replace the current funding for the Rosenthal Project Sustainability initiatives. Any payments outside this cycle will be funded from internal reserves and reimbursed in due course from the Sustainability Levy in due course.

 

Community Consultation

 

No public consultation is required however, site works by Ausgrid and its contractors will include appropriate site management, signage, preparation and implementation of traffic management plans in accordance with specific job requirements.

 

Conclusion

 

The ‘Lighting the Way’ program provides a cost effective way of Council reducing energy costs and therefore greenhouse gas emissions, whilst improving lighting quality in residential streets. The pricing negotiated via SSROC now makes it cost effective for councils to pursue the option, as the full energy savings and reduced maintenance costs are being passed onto councils.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council accept Ausgrid’s proposal for the accelerated replacement of 1184 Ausgrid lights on residential roads over the next three (3) years, funded through Council’s Sustainability Levy.       

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Terescenko

Executive Manager - Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 11 December 2017

Changes to Independent Hearing and Assessment Panels

 

 

Subject:          Changes to Independent Hearing and Assessment Panels    

Record No:    SU4720 - 72484/17

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):      Michael Mason; Craig Wrightson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report informs Council that the State Government has, as part of an overhaul of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act (EP&A Act), proposed changes to Council’s Independent Hearing and Assessment Panel (IHAP).  The proposed changes are part of a broader range of changes and amendments that seek to change how Council’s undertake strategic planning, enhance community participation and consultation, improve probity and accountability and ensure the development process is simpler and faster for applicants.

 

The proposed changes were first identified in August 2017 and finally gazetted on the 15 November 2017.  The changes are detailed in the EP&A Amendment Act as well as regulations and guidelines which are yet to be finalized.

 

It is recommended delegated authority be granted to select the panel members and a submission be made on the referral criteria as outline in the report.

 

Overview

 

The over arching purpose of the changes to the new IHAP procedures is to depoliticize the development assessment process undertaken by Councils in the Greater Sydney Region and Wollongong.

 

Currently there are approximately 10 Sydney Councils that have established IHAPs.  The EPA Amendment Act will require all Sydney Council and Wollongong to establish a Local Planning Panel by either amending an existing IHAP or establishing a Local Planning Panel (LPP).

 

Background

 

In September 2012 Lane Cove Council established a decision making Independent Hearing and Assessment Panel (IHAP) to determine development applications that are:-

 

·    Polarising in the community;

·    Are complex or may benefit from a broader review of issues; and

·    Over $100k and Council is the land owner.

 

Applications are referred for IHAP review and determination by the General Manager having regard to the above matters and discussion with staff.

 

The Lane Cove IHAP is comprised of a Chair and generally 3 members, comprising a Lawyer, Architect/Planner, Environmental Science and community representative.  Council called for and appointed a pool of experts and community representatives when establishing the IHAP.

 

Since that time Council has referred approximately 209 applications for consideration and determination to the Lane Cove IHAP and only one DA has subsequently been referred to the Court of Appeal.

 

This represents approximately 13% of total applications determined by Council.  The remaining 87% were determined under delegated authority by staff having regard to the provisions of the EP&A Act, Council’s LEP, DCP policies and guidelines and the particular merit of individual applications.

 

The Department of Planning have provided a range of information which is summarised as follows:-

 

What is an Independent Hearing and Assessment Panel?

 

·    An Independent Heating and Assessment Panel, known as an IHAP, is a panel of three independent expert members and a community member which assesses development applications made to local Councils.

 

·    IHAPs are to become mandatory for all councils in Sydney and for Wollongong City Council.  IHAPs are to be put in place so that the process of assessment and determination of development applications (DAs) of high value, sensitivity or strategic importance is transparent and accountable.

 

·    There are a number of criteria that will determine when DAs will be determined by IHAPs.  If they don’t meet the criteria they will be determined by Council staff.  Criteria are set out in this report.

 

What is the membership of IHAPs?

 

·    The Minister’s role in relation to IHAPs will be to facilitate their establishment and ensure their operations are independent and fair.

 

·    The Minister will approve a pool of independent, qualified persons from which the Chair and two expert members must be appointed by councils. These members will have to be qualified in one or more of the following disciplines; planning, architect, heritage, the environment, urban design, economics, traffic and transport, law, engineering, tourism or government and public administration.

 

·    The Chair will be appointed by the Minister and have expertise in law or government and public administration.

 

·    For each item of business there will be the Chair, two experts and a community representative.              

 

·    It will be up to Council to appoint the community members to sit on the panel. A community representative but does not have to be an expert in a particular field. Mayors and councillors are not eligible for appointment, nor are property developers or real estate agents. As Council has Wards, Council must appoint a community representative for each Ward. All community representatives can attend the IHAP meeting, where the chairperson will identify the appropriate representative to be heard and vote on the matter.

 

Comment

 

IHAPs (LPPs) are to be established by 1st March 2018 and the Department of Planning is currently recruiting for experts and Chairs for the new Panels.  The Minister will allocate the Chair for each Council area and Council will chose experts from a pool endorsed by the Minister. For each meeting the chair will select the panel members. This arrangement will lead to additional cost, as potentially there will be three community members in attendance, as Council has three Wards, and each will be paid even if they only participate in one item.

 

Community representatives for Lane Cove have been called and the nomination period closes on 15 December 2017.  Existing Lane Cove community representatives have been invited to nominate for the new Local Planning Panel (LPP).

 

The Department of Planning has requested nominations by 31 January, 2018 which is prior to the first Council meeting in 2018. It will therefore be recommended that the Mayor and General Manager be delegated authority to select the community representatives and if required the expert members, and report the selections to the February 2018 Council meeting.

 

What items will be considered by the IHAP?

 

The Department of Planning & Environment is currently refining a number of the guidelines and is proposing the following referral criteria for IHAP’s that would apply to Lane Cove.

 

1.     General development

a)    Development that has an estimated cost of more than $5 million, but not development comprising only:

                                          i.    internal alterations and additions to retail premises or office premises, or

                                         ii.    maintenance of a heritage item.

b)    Development for which a development application was determined by the local planning panel.

 

2.    Conflict of interest

 

Development for which the applicant or land owner is:

a)    the council,

b)    a councillor,

c)    a member of council staff who is principally involved in the exercise of council’s functions under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 

d)    a member of Parliament (either the Parliament of New South Wales or Parliament of the Commonwealth), or

e)    a relative (within the meaning of the Local Government Act 1993) of a person referred to in (a) to (d).

 

but not development for the following purposes which requires the consent of the owner of the land:

 

f)                 internal alterations and additions to retail premises or office premises,

g)                advertising signage,

h)                maintenance of a heritage item, or

i)     minor building structures projecting from the building facade over public land (such as awnings, verandas, bay windows, flagpoles, pipes and services, and sun shading devices).

 

3.    Contentious development

 

Development that:

a)    in the case of a council having an approved submissions policy – is the subject of the number of submissions set by that policy, or

b)    in any other case – is the subject of 10 or more unique submissions by way of objection.

 

An approved submissions policy is a policy prepared by the council and approved by the Secretary of the Department of Planning and Environment which details the circumstances in which a local planning panel or council staff should exercise the consent authority functions of the council, based on the number and nature of submissions received about development.

 

4.    Departure from development standards

 

Development that contravenes a development standard imposed by an environmental planning instrument by more than 10%.  But not where the Secretary has given concurrence to the contravention, or where the concurrence has been assumed.

 

5.    Sensitive development

 

a)    Designated development.

b)    Development to which State Environmental Planning Policy No 65 – Design Quality of Residential Apartment Development applies.

c)    Development involving the demolition of a heritage item.

d)    Development for the purposes of new licenced premises, that will require one of the following liquor licences:

                      i.        a club licence under the Registered Clubs Act 1976,

                     ii.        a hotel (general bar) licence under the Liquor Act 2007, or

                    iii.        an on-premises licence for public entertainment venues under the Liquor Act 2007.

e)                Development for the purpose of sex services premises and restricted premises.

f)                 Development applications for which the developer has offered to enter into a planning agreement.

 

6.    6. Planning Proposals

 

A council is required to refer all planning proposals to the local planning panel for advice, unless the council’s general manager determines that the planning proposal relates to:

 

a)    the correction of an obvious error in a local environmental plan,

b)    matters that are of a consequential, transitional, machinery or other minor nature, or

c)    matters that the panel considers will not have any significant adverse impact on the environment or adjoining land.

 

Comment

 

The use of extensive prescriptive referral mechanisms is a significant change to Council’s current IHAP referral requirements. Whilst the proposed referral criteria are acceptable, a real advantage of Lane Cove’s IHAP model is the ability of the General Manager to determine any application may go to the IHAP that is complex or contentious. The most common example of this is applications which involve view sharing. These applications would not often generate large numbers of submissions, i.e. more than ten submissions, as proposed in the criteria, yet are of a complexity that benefits from the IHAP examining the issues. There are other complex applications also which are too exhaustive to pre-list, therefore it is recommended that Council make a submission suggesting that the proposed “Submissions Policy” provide the opportunity for the Secretary to allow the General Manager of a Council to refer any matter to the IHAP which they believe to be of significant complexity to warrant a referral. 

 

Also, the requirement to refer Planning Proposals to the panel or advice is another step added to the already convoluted process. Dependent on the timing of AP meetings it is unlikely that a Council could receive a Planning Proposal, assess it, refer it to the IHAP for comment, consider the comments and then refer it to a Council meeting within the prescribed 90 day limit. It is therefore recommended that Council in its submission request such referral not be mandatory, but be at the discretion of the General Manager.

 

How will IHAPs operate?

 

IHAPs are to be governed by a code of conduct and operational procedures that will ensure the proper conduct of members, procedural fairness and efficient and effective meetings. The code of conduct adopts the terms of the Office of Local Government's Model Code of Conduct for Local Councils in NSW (October 2017). It has been amended to remove provisions that are not relevant to panel members and includes some additional provisions consistent with the legislative framework for IHAPs.

 

The operational procedures are designed to ensure that IHAPs meet their obligations in the most efficient and effective manner. The operational procedures include provisions for how I HAP chairs are to be rotated.

 

Conclusion

 

The proposed introduction of Mandatory IHAP’s has the potential to reduce the effectiveness of Council’s current IHAP operations. It is appropriate Council make a submission on the proposed operating model to mitigate these impacts.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.         The report be received and noted;

 

2.         The Mayor and General Manager be delegated authority to select the community representatives and if required the expert members for the new IHAP, and report the selections to the February 2018 Council meeting; and

 

3.         Council make a submission to the Department of Planning and Environment requesting:-

a.   The requirement to have on each IHAP a community member of the Ward in which an application is based, be removed.

b.   The proposed “Submissions Policy” provide the opportunity for the Secretary to allow the General Manager of a council to refer any matter to the IHAP which they believe to be of significant complexity to warrant a referral.

c.   request that referral of Planning Proposals to the IHAP not be mandatory, but be at the discretion of the General Manager.

 

 

 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 11 December 2017

Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove: 2018 - 2023

 

 

Subject:          Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove: 2018 - 2023    

Record No:    SU5300 - 72486/17

Division:         Human Services Division

Author(s):      Carol Sinclair 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council has been a member of the World Health Organisations Global Network of Age-Friendly Cities and Communities since June 2014 and has committed to undertaking a cycle of continuous improvement.  The first ‘Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove’ is due for completion in December 2017.  This strategy has been evaluated and a new plan has been developed.  This report presents the documentation associated with this process so that the draft ‘Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove: 2018-2023’ may be adopted for the purpose of public consultation.

 

Background

 

In February 2014 Council decided to develop a ‘Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove’ based on the World Health Organisations (WHO) Global Network of Age-Friendly Cities and Communities. 

 

The program recognises that our population is ageing and proactively seeks to foster an environment that promotes active ageing and community engagement and to be responsive to the changing needs of residents as they age.

 

There are 8,600 people aged 55 years and over living in the Lane Cove Local Government Area (L.G.A).  They make up 24% of the population.  The older population in Lane Cove is culturally quite diverse, with the proportion of older residents born in non-English speaking countries (27.3%) higher than NSW (23.8%).  10% of the older population of Lane Cove requires assistance, and this has grown over the past 10 years. Around 25% of older people in Lane Cove volunteer and 20% of older people in Lane Cove live by themselves. Both the proportion and the absolute number of older people in the Lane Cove population will increase over the next 20 years to 26.6% of the population and 13,900 people.

 

Lane Cove’s ‘Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove’ aims to make the Council area a good place for older people to live, work and visit. It targets the environmental, social and economic factors that influence the health and wellbeing of older adults and is based on a ‘bottom up’ approach to improve their lived experiences and addresses the follow eight areas or domains:-

 

1.         Outdoor spaces and buildings;

2.         Transportation;

3.         Housing;

4.         Social participation;

5.         Respect and social inclusion;

6.         Civic participation and employment;

7.         Communication and information; and

8.         Community support and health services.

 

Some important milestones in this work are listed below:-

 

·    In June 2014 Council was welcomed into the WHO Global Network of Age-Friendly Cities and Communities, the first Council in NSW and the 9th Council in Australia to do so;

 

·    An Age-Friendly Advisory Committee was established in October 2014 and began work on overseeing the implementation of the actions in the plan;

 

·    The ‘Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove: 2014-2017’ was presented to Council for the purpose of community consultation in March 2015 and was formally adopted at the meeting of 1 June 2015;

 

·    Council staff presented the ‘Strategy for Age-Friendly Lane Cove’ at the LGNSW Disability Inclusion and Liveable Communities Forum in September 2014, at the Municipal Associations Victoria (MAV) Age-Friendly Cities and Communities National Conference in October 2014 and at the Age-Friendly Cities Forum in Hobart in October this year;

 

·    Council won the Planning Institute Australia NSW Award for Excellence in the category of ‘Public Engagement and Community Planning’ in November 2015 and was a national finalist in this category; and

 

·    90% of the actions in the 2014-2017 Action Plan have been completed and/or are ongoing.

 

Discussion

 

The first Action plan (3 year cycle) is nearing completion. Work has been undertaken to comply with the next phase of the WHO Global Network of Age-Friendly Cities and Communities process, which is to develop an Action Plan for a further 5 year period.

 

Consultations were held during August and September 2017. Eight (8) focus groups, two (2) general community forums and eight (8) ‘Meetings in a Box’ were conducted, and surveys, either online or by paper, were received from 222 people. A total of 348 people provided their views on the age-friendliness of Lane Cove and provided their suggestions for improvement. 

 

A key rationale for developing and undertaking the original survey in 2014 was to establish a rating indicator or assessment tool which could be replicated at subsequent stages of the WHO process. It was decided that this should occur on the basis of a 5 point semantic differential scale by which respondents rated Lane Cove Council area, both on each topic or domain, and overall and an average score was calculated based on the proportion of respondents providing each rating e.g. excellent, good, etc.  The survey was replicated in 2017 to provide a comparative assessment of age-friendliness three years later following the implementation of the first Action Plan.

 

The findings have been presented in the Consultation Outcomes document attached as AT-1.   The goals for each domain and the strategies and actions to achieve them were extrapolated from the Consultation Outcomes to form the draft ‘Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove: 2018 – 2023’, shown attached as AT-2.  The evaluation of the first plan occurred simultaneously and the evaluation report of the first plan is shown as AT-3 (Conclusions) and AT-4 (Full Report).

 

The assessment of Lane Cove LGA in 2017, like the baseline assessment in 2014, found that Lane Cove rates “above average” in terms of its overall age-friendliness. This has slightly improved in the last three years. There were many highly rating domains which combine to make Lane Cove a good place for older people to live, work and visit.  Overall, the respondents rated the age-friendliness of the Lane Cove Council L.G.A area as 3.86 on a scale between 1.0 and 5.0 compared to 3.81 in 2014. Of most importance is that the survey indicates an upward trend, allowing Council to track progress over time.

 

Three new questions were added to the survey to gain a qualitative evaluation of whether older people in the community perceived that there had been an improvement in the age-friendliness of the LGA over that time. Of all respondents who answered this question, 64% thought that age-friendliness had improved, while 36% thought that it had not. The proportions of respondents who noticed an improvement increased the more they had engaged in the previous study. Of respondents who completed a survey last time, 75% noticed an improvement; of respondents who participated in a consultation group last time, 77% noticed an improvement; and of respondents who completed both a survey and participated in a consultation group last time (although numbers are small), 80% noticed an improvement.

 

Community Consultation

 

Statement of Intent

 

The consultation is designed to seek public opinion on the Draft ‘Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove: 2018 – 2023’.  Comments received will assist Council in finalising the Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove Plan.

 

Method

 

Level of Participation

Inform

Inform

Consult

Form of Participation

Open

Targeted

Open

Target Audience

Lane Cove Community and community groups

Key Message givers eg. Sydney Community Services, Meeting House, Probus groups, Rotary Club of Lane Cove and the like

Lane Cove Community

Proposed Medium

Advertisement and

eNewsletter

Notification Letters

Public Exhibition &

Website Exhibition

Indicative Timing

February – March 2018

February – March 2018

February – March 2018

 

Conclusion

 

Community consultation has shown that the ‘Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove: 2014-2017’ has been effective in improving the ‘age-friendliness’ of Lane Cove.  In qualitative terms there has also been an improvement with older people feeling more heard and provided for in the LGA.  

 

The evaluation of the outgoing plan ‘Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove: 2014-2017 Evaluation Report’, the ‘Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove Consultation Outcomes: 2018-2023’ and the new ‘Draft Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove: 2018-2023’ is presented to Council for adoption for public consultation.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

1.   The ‘Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove Consultation Outcomes: 2018-2023’ as at   AT- 1 be noted;

 

2.   The ‘Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove: 2014-2017 Evaluation Report’ as at AT- 3   and AT- 4 be noted;

 

3.   The Draft ‘Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove: 2018-2023’ included as AT- 2 be adopted for the purpose of consultation;

 

4.   The Draft document be put on public exhibition for a period of two months in accordance with the consultation strategy outlined in the report; and

 

5.   A further report be prepared for Council following the consultation period.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Gornall

Executive Manager - Human Services

Human Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove-Consultation Outcomes:2018-2023

256 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑2View

Draft 'Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove: 2018-2023-Action Plan

51 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑3View

Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove  2014-2017 - Conclusions

1 Page

 

AT‑4View

Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove:2014-2017-Evaluation Report

132 Pages

Available Electronically

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 11 December 2017

Sustainability Levy - Small Grants - Round 14

 

 

Subject:          Sustainability Levy - Small Grants - Round 14    

Record No:    SU6635 - 70176/17

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):      Fiona McCleary 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Round 14 of the Sustainable Levy Small Grants Program closed on 30 September 2017. Five (5) applications were received and two (2) projects are recommended for funding.

 

Background

 

The purpose of the Sustainability Small Grants Program is to assist the development of a range of initiatives that are of direct and practical benefit to a sustainable Lane Cove community. Organisations and community groups may apply for a grant of up to $5,000 to implement sustainability projects. (AT-1 Information Kit for Small Grants Application Information)

 

Discussion

 

Following advertising of Round 14 of the Small Grants Program, five (5) complying applications were received by Council for funding (AT- 2 Round 14 Sustainability Small Grants Program – Review of Project Submissions):-

 

·    Bicycles for Change – purchase of a shipping container to store donated bikes that will be shipped to Africa to the value of $4,700;

 

·    FoodFaith Ltd – purchase of gardening tools and cost of plumber to the value of $4,652;

 

·    Lane Cove Sustainability Action Group – Boomerang Bags - purchase of a sewing machine and consumables to make reusable bags to the value of $1,000;

 

·    Lane Cove Bushland and Conservation Society Inc – a four (4) site geotrail within Warrawoon Reserve and the creation of a website page and pamphlet to the value of $4,680; and

 

·    Lane Cove Sustainability Action Group – Bagshare – purchase of 6 bins and labeling to house reusable bags to the value of $995.

 

After conducting a review of the applications it is recommended that two (2) projects receive the funding as they are deemed to have direct and positive community based outcomes and long-term environmental benefits:

 

·    Lane Cove Sustainability Action Group – Bagshare. The Bagshare program supports Council’s goal of reducing single-use plastic bags in the community.

 

·    FoodFaith Ltd. The FoodFaith community garden provides an important cultural, community and multi-faith attraction for residents.

 

It is recommended Council does not fund the following projects for the reasons listed below:-

 

·    Lane Cove Bushland and Conservation Society Inc – the geotrail is of limited benefit to the wider community;

 

·    Bicycles for Change - There are limited benefits to the residents of Lane Cove and Council does not have space for a shipping container; and

 

·    Lane Cove Sustainability Action Group – Boomerang Bags - Council doesn’t purchase electrical items and manufacturing equipment.

 

Budget

 

There is currently $15,000 available in the budget for this financial year. Funds not allocated in Round 14 will be available for Round 15 which will be advertised in February 2018.

 

Conclusion

 

The two (2) projects recommended for funding under the Sustainability Levy Small Grants Program

promote sustainable behaviour and have the potential to inspire and motivate residents of Lane

Cove to live more sustainably.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council approve the funding for:-

 

1.   Lane Cove Sustainability Action Group – Bagshare to the value of $995

 

2.   FoodFaith Ltd to the value of $4,652.

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Information Kit - Round 14 (September 2017) Sustainability Small Grants Program

6 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑2View

Round 14 Sustainability Small Grants Program - Review of Project Submissions

3 Pages

Available Electronically

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 11 December 2017

Revised Draft North District Plan

 

 

Subject:          Revised Draft North District Plan    

Record No:    SU2871 - 70127/17

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):      Christopher Pelcz; Terry Tredrea 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The purpose of this report is to focus on the main elements and key changes made to the Revised draft North district Plan. In November 2016, the Greater Sydney Commission (GSC) released six draft District Plans, including one for the North District, which includes Lane Cove. These plans provide a 20 year vision for each of the Greater Sydney Districts. In March 2017, a Report on the previous Plan was submitted to Council (AT-1), in which basic support and some concerns were expressed. In response to submissions, the GSC has since revised the North District Plan (AT-2 & AT-3), and seeks further submissions by 15 December 2017.

 

In general terms, the Revised Plan confirms and supports the following:-

 

1.   The overall role of the GSC in providing an objective, integrated means of achieving planning outcomes that promote the value of liveability;

 

2.   The general approach of spreading housing density across districts and areas that are best suited to increase density by virtue of capacity and infrastructure. Housing targets for Lane Cove Council are unchanged, but Council is well ahead of the proposed 5-year residential growth target. The postponement of setting a 20-year target, to allow further consideration of limited residential growth potential at a more realistic time, is welcomed;

 

3.   Recognition that, with “relatively few opportunities to increase the quantity of public open space, and therefore greater emphasis… on improving the quality and distribution of open space”, Council continues to provide innovative solutions throughout the LGA. In particular, it is again requested that the proposed St Leonards Plaza be included in the proposed Green Grid, or attributed special significance and priority in the North District Plan, given its linchpin significance in revitalising the Precinct;

 

4.   Jobs targets in St Leonards are unchanged from March 2017. However, it is now identified as a Collaboration Area and Priority Precinct, which states that there are greater opportunities here “to grow jobs, housing and infrastructure”. Council welcomes these opportunities;

 

5.   The St Leonards/Crows Nest Land Use and Infrastructure Strategy currently underway by the Department may recommend a Special Infrastructure Contribution (SIC) to operate in St Leonards for development that becomes available under future planning proposals;

 

6.   More flexibility in the proposed Affordable Rental Housing target to recognise the need to provide housing for “key workers” within 30 minutes journey to work; and

 

7.   Consistent with the 2016 draft Plan, Council continues to support the direction to “protect and manage” employment lands, such as in Lane Cove West and St Leonards, especially from rezoning valuable employment land to residential use. This supports Council’s long-standing policy position on development in Lane Cove West and St Leonards.

 

There are several relevant differences between the 2016 draft Plan and this 2017 Revised draft Plan. Most of these differences relate to changed prominence given to existing planning priorities:-

1.   Infrastructure & Collaboration. Council welcomes greater emphasis placed on improvements to transport and other infrastructure to support housing and reduce congestion. This reflects the GSC’s approach of integrating inputs from state agencies such as Transport for NSW and NSW Health, and focusing on place-based planning. Collaboration Areas, mostly health and education precincts such as St Leonards Precinct, are given greater emphasis;

 

2.   As part of the District’s 20-year target for housing supply, the North District was expected to provide 97,000 dwellings. This has changed now to 92,000. Lane Cove welcomes the removal of a 20-year residential target, as this will be calculated closer to 2021 in collaboration with Council. This is a more realistic approach to the limited future growth potential;

 

3.   Slightly more emphasis is given to support for more medium residential density. This is to provide greater choice to suit varying household sizes and budgets;

 

4.   “Social connection” has emerged more prominently as a Planning Priority since 2016. “This draft District Plan recognises cultural richness and diversity as some of Greater Sydney’s key strengths”. A place-based approach to planning is suggested in fostering the creation of communities; and

 

5.   More prominence is placed on measures to combat the effects of climate change, such as protection of urban tree canopy cover. Such corridors as along Epping Road are identified as problematic.

 

It is recommended that Council support the Revised Draft North Plan, in principle, highlighting the concerns described in this report.

 

Background

 

In November 2016, the Greater Sydney Commission (GSC) released six draft District Plans, one of which addresses the North District, which includes Lane Cove. Planning for the (now) five districts will support the vision for Sydney’s three cities. These district plans provide a 20 year vision for each of the Greater Sydney Districts. They will support what is now the Greater Sydney Region Plan (October 2017). In March 2017, Council submitted a response to the Plan in March 2017, which expressed basic support and some concerns (AT-1). The GSC has since revised the North District Plan (AT-2 & AT-3), and seeks further submissions on this revision by 15 December 2017.

 

The District Plans represent a response to the need to rethink our current planning approach for the Greater Sydney Area. It represents a more integrated approach to planning for these important elements, as together they provide a more holistic approach to the region including, for example:-

 

·    Increased housing targets that have regard to capacity of an LGA;

·    Refining targets to a capacity model that is reviewed on a 5-year basis;

·    Employment targets;

·    Protection of employment and urban services land;

·    Integration of infrastructure with land use planning; and

·    Integration of Sydney’s Green Grid.

 

Council supports this integrated approach adopted by the Greater Sydney Commission. In addition, the Plan refers to targets for housing, economic hubs, transport infrastructure, natural landscapes and heritage, which are mostly measurable.

 

The North District area is shown in the figure below.

 

Fig: North District

 

Status of the Draft District Plans

 

Draft District Plans sit in the middle of the hierarchy of the Regional, District and Local Planning controls within Greater Sydney. Draft District Plans provide guidance for councils on priorities and actions that need to be addressed in future Local plans (LEPs & DCPs).

 

Structure of the Plan

 

New guiding principles are adopted for the four key priorities of:-

 

1.         Infrastructure and collaboration (integrating infrastructure into planning);

2.         Productivity (employment and economic connections);

3.         Liveability (housing choice, diversity and affordability); and

4.         Sustainability in an environmental, economic and service sense.

 

Each section of the Plan contains a series of Priorities and Actions (see AT-2).

 

The next section of this report will discuss the main elements and key changes of the Revised draft North District Plan and the potential implications for Lane Cove.

 

Discussion

 

Main Elements of the Revised Draft District Plan

 

1.   High quality Open Space

 

The new Planning Priority N20, delivering high quality open space, recognises that:

 

There will be relatively few opportunities to increase the quantity of public open space, and therefore greater emphasis will be needed on improving the quality and distribution of open space… (page 102)

 

Council has adopted innovative solutions to the problem of providing open space in an urban infill area. For example, a land swap in the Mowbray high density precinct will result in a 270% increase in quality open space for residents. While providing a series of east-west pedestrian link in the proposed St Leonards South precinct it will connect an existing Newlands Park to a new 3,800m2 park. In addition, targeted new high-rise mixed-use development in St Leonards will fund a new 5,000m2 St Leonards Plaza over the rail line. A public car park on Rosenthal Avenue is being converted to a public park plus supermarket, and basement car parking. Council expects the State Government to recognise these innovative projects, such as in this Revised Plan, and in the St Leonards/Crows Nest Station Precinct study.

 

As stated in the March 2017 Report, it is noted that there will be relatively few opportunities to further increase the quantity of public open space in an urban infill area. Therefore there will be greater emphasis needed on improving the quality, distribution and access to open space. Given the strategic importance and the linchpin status of the Plaza to the revitalisation and development in St Leonards, it is requested that this item be included in the proposed Green Grid, or be attributed special significance and priority in the North District Plan.  This is a long-standing project of the Council and has the ongoing support of the Department and the GSC. This vital piece of public infrastructure and open space will become a foundation for sustainable growth and liveability in the St Leonards precinct, while providing high quality public domain and workforce amenity as well as a stimulus to the commercial growth of the precinct.

 

2.   Jobs Target in St Leonards

 

The proposed economic target set for St Leonards as primarily an employment and transport hub appear well founded and support Council’s current policy approach. St Leonards is identified as integral to the Eastern Economic corridor, especially in its role in making the corridor “better connected and more competitive” (Planning Priority N8). The Revised Draft identifies St Leonards as a Health and Education Precinct (page 59). As such, it is identified as important, “as a key employment centre in Greater Sydney”, and as a Priority Precinct. One important Action is to “leverage the new Sydney Metro station at Crows Nest to deliver additional employment capacity”.

 

The Plan reconfirms the jobs target for St Leonards:

 

 

However, to date the jobs targets for St Leonards have not been achieved, and the new target is an extrapolation of previous targets. There is little substantial planning in the Plan to promote this key employment role. The Department of Planning’s Land Use & Infrastructure Implementation Plan for the St Leonards/Crows Nest Station Precinct is due in March 2018. Council urges a practical approach to job creation. As such, attention should focus on:

 

Planning Priority N10 : Growing investment, business opportunities and jobs in strategic centres.  (p61)

 

The location of St Leonards as a Collaboration Area should bring together local government, the private sector, Transport for NSW and NSW Health, “to grow jobs, housing and infrastructure within the precinct” (p20) The new Metro station “presents an opportunity for renewal and growth” (p59).  St Leonards continues to be identified as a “Strategic Centre” (as shown in the figure below) and addressed by principles of urban design on page 63, such as walkability and adequate (transport) infrastructure.

 

Source: Revised Draft North District Plan, 2017: page 45

 

3.   Residential Growth around Strategic Centres

 

The Revised Plan continues to reiterate a dwelling target for Lane Cove of an additional 1,900 dwellings (2016-2021). Consistent with the guiding principle of spreading densities across areas that have capacity and infrastructure capability, it continues to encourage, “delivering housing within a walkable distance of strategic centres”. This includes St Leonards, especially near the rail stations, as shown in the figure below.

 

Source: Revised Draft North District Plan, 2017: page 37

 

 

Over the past 5 years Lane Cove has facilitated significant residential development which has exceeded the dwelling growth targets set by the State Government, previously 3,900 by 2031. The capacity within the current LEP is approximately 4,300 dwellings. Since 2010 Council has approved 3,919 additional dwellings, and a current DA at St Leonards for 458 apartments, would if approved, see this increase to 4,377. Council has already undertaken planning for St Leonards South, which will deliver an additional 2,400 dwellings and a planning proposal in St Leonards will deliver 450 units, this equates to a 55% increase. It is also possible that the forthcoming St Leonards/Crows Nest Station Precinct plan may recommend to increase residential supply even further in St Leonards.

 

Council is encouraged by the removal of a 20-year dwelling target set for each LGA. Given that Council is already well ahead of current growth targets it important that the Commission’s projections, now to be made by 2021, result from realistic consultations with individual councils.   It is requested that the GSC acknowledge the current and proposed ‘heavy lifting’ being undertaken by the Lane Cove community, and that there will be limited capacity for future dwelling construction in Lane Cove once St Leonards South is completed.

 

More generally, under Planning Priority N5, to provide housing supply, choice and affordability, councils are expected to prepare a local housing strategy. This should address strategies to meet 10 and 20-year housing targets (page 39).

 

4.   Further funding of Liveable Priority Precincts

 

The purpose of potential State government Special Infrastructure Contributions (SICs) is to enhance the liveability, sustainability and productivity of Priority Precincts such as St Leonards. It aims to help fund the delivery of essential community infrastructure such as district health, schools, open space and roads.

 

No specific actions have been identified for the Special Infrastructure Contribution levy/charge at this stage. However, the St Leonards/Crows Nest land use and infrastructure strategy currently underway by the Department may well recommend a SIC to operate in St Leonards.

 

5.      Affordable Rental Housing Target and Definition

 

The discussion on housing strategies and targets in Planning Priority N5 in the Draft North District Plan (Providing housing supply, choice and affordability, with access to jobs and services) states that to address housing supply, strategies are to be developed by councils to:-

 

·    Make provisions to meet the five and 10 year targets and identify capacity to contribute to the 20-year district strategic supply;

·    Inform the Affordable Rental Housing Target for development precincts; and

·    Coordinate the planning and delivery of local and State infrastructure.

 

Specifically with respect to housing affordability, the Plan includes Action 16, which is that Councils and other planning authorities will prepare Affordable Rental Housing Target schemes. No timeframe is included for this action.

 

The Plan notes with respect to Affordable Rental Housing Targets:-

 

·    The NSW Department of Planning and Environment and the Commission will jointly investigate ways to facilitate housing diversity through innovative purchase and rental models;

·    The Plan recommends that the NSW Government adopt Affordable Rental Housing Targets for very low to low-income households in Greater Sydney as a mechanism to deliver the supply of affordable housing; and

·    The Plan states that the Commission’s testing affirms that across Greater Sydney targets generally in the range of 5-10 per cent of new residential floor space are viable.

 

Council is currently supporting “key worker” housing in many new developments, such as on Pacific Highway, St Leonards, Epping Road, and Lane Cove West. Affordable housing is complex public policy issue, in which local government has a limited span of influence and which requires coordination of mechanisms across levels of government. The action to prepare Affordable Rental Target Schemes for addressing affordable rental housing shortfall in the Draft Plan appears to be directed to local government as the primary carrier of this responsibility. In reality any such schemes require State Government to be responsible for such coordination under a broader Affordable Housing Program, given its role in representing NSW’s interests to the Commonwealth and its administration of environment and land use planning legislation for the State. To do otherwise will result in each council replicating the arduous and costly process of determining policy and design models that are attractive to both investors and households, and leave the issue of affordable housing for purchase off the table.

 

The Draft Plan recommends that Affordable Rental Housing Targets and Schemes address affordable housing for very low to low-income households. This is not in step with the current Affordable Rental Housing SEPP or with the reality that moderate income households are also locked out of the housing market in many areas of the North District. The Affordable Rental Housing targets and schemes must give councils the option to select the proportions of  all three categories (very low, low and moderate) to also allow councils to adequately address the need for key worker housing, which is a pressing issue in Lane Cove and neighbouring councils.

 

The Draft Plan states that the Commission’s view is that targets for affordable rental housing of 5-10 per cent of new residential floor space across Greater Sydney are viable. The assumptions and modelling to evidence this view should be made available to councils to allow for reality checking and to multiply the impact of this work. The target range is large, indicating that the modelling’s assumptions have resulted in variable outcomes in different locations across the District.

 

Additionally, any such global target for the District cannot be equally apportioned to each council, as access to suitable land and/or redevelopment sites will vary, as will the relative need for affordable housing for sub-groups such as key workers who support large community infrastructure like major hospitals, and residents at risk of being excluded from continuing to reside in their long-term community due to market, social and personal changes.

 

It is apparent that the Affordable Housing SEPP bonuses have not been sufficiently attractive to developers and very limited quantities of affordable housing have been delivered. In any future arrangements flexibility for innovative purchase and rental models should also be allowable. This is because given the relatively small amounts of housing available and timing of their availability, it will always be difficult to match the renter’s needs with available stock, meaning there is a need for dwelling diversity in terms of size, location etc.

 

6.   Protection of Industrial/Urban Services Land

 

Source: Revised Draft North District Plan, 2017: page 73

 

Consistent with the 2016 draft Plan, the direction is to “protect and manage” employment lands, such as in Lane Cove West and St Leonards, especially from rezoning valuable employment land to residential use. This supports Council’s long-standing policy position on development in Lane Cove West and St Leonards. The primacy of employment land use over further residential use in the B3 Commercial Core zone, particularly in St Leonards is in keeping with Council’s strategic direction for St Leonards.

 

Planning Priority N11: Protecting and managing industrial and urban services land.

 

“industrial and urban services land provides space for emerging future industries. (p72)

 

The following key quotation is relevant to Lane Cove.

 

“economic growth and a greater diversity of jobs will be targeted in the strategic centres of St Leonards…” (page 6)

 

In St Leonards, the current Priority Precinct study for the St Leonards/Crows Nest Station Precinct will provide a land use and infrastructure strategy. This will be built upon the extensive planned development already taking place. It will guide future development and infrastructure delivery over the next 20 years to 2036.

 

Key Changes

 

While the Revised North district Plan remains largely unchanged in its vision, several items have become more prominent as a result of consultation in 2017. These are:-

 

1.   Infrastructure & Collaboration

 

Greater emphasis is placed on improvements to transport and other infrastructure to support housing. This focus addresses the need to relieve congestion of local through traffic, and supports the major road and rail upgrades. An entire new Section has been introduced at the beginning of the revised Plan. It focuses on such items as transport initiatives to connect residents to nearby centres within 30 minutes proximity. It emphasises strategies for place-based outcomes, informing agencies, the private sector and the wider community of an expectation for growth and change, especially in residential and employment areas, such as in St Leonards. This reflects the GSC’s approach of integrating inputs from state agencies such as Transport for NSW and NSW Health, and focusing on place-based planning.

 

Collaboration Areas, mostly health and education precincts such as St Leonards Precinct, are given greater emphasis, where all levels of government work together with the community and business to grow Priority Precincts. Currently the State government is working with the three councils plus agencies such as Transport for NSW and Health NSW on an integrated plan for the St Leonards/Crows Nest Station Precinct, as discussed earlier.

 

2.   Targets

 

As part of the district’s 5-year target for housing supply, Lane Cove was expected to provide 1,900 dwellings. Over 20 years, the North District was expected to provide 97,000 dwellings. This has changed now to 92,000. Lane Cove no longer has a 20-year target, as this will be calculated closer to 2021 in collaboration with Council. Council welcomes this measured approach to projected housing need.

 

In terms of jobs, St Leonards Precinct (including parts of North Sydney and Willoughby council areas) continues to be expected to provide an extra number between 6,900 and 16,400 jobs. No detail has been provided on how this will be achieved.

 

3.   Medium density

 

Slightly more emphasis is given to support for more medium residential density. The rationale is to provide greater choice to suit varying household sizes and budgets. This could be in areas transitioning from high to low density and where it is economically viable to do so. It is noted that in some areas of Lane Cove, such as St Leonards South, the exceptionally high cost of land prevents medium density development from being viable, which was confirmed during the master planning phase. By contrast, a history of less expensive land around Lane Cove Village has in the past made medium density residential development viable here.

 

4.   Neighbourhood Character

 

Local identity as expressed in neighbourhood character is now seen as important in fostering socially connected communities. “Social connection” has emerged more prominently as a Planning Priority since 2016. “This draft district Plan recognises cultural richness and diversity as some of Greater Sydney’s key strengths”, and social connection as key to these strengths. A place-based approach to planning is suggested in the creation of communities. This has been elevated to Planning Priority N4.

 

5.   Climate Change

 

More prominence is placed on measures to combat the effects of climate change, such as protection of urban tree canopy cover. These are now Planning Priorities N19 & N22. For example, canopy cover has been given emphasis on expansion of tree cover. Such corridors as along Epping Road are identified as problematic. Canopy cover is valued for its role in improving amenity and air quality, and improving microclimate.

 

Conclusion

 

Overall, Council welcomes the Revised Draft North District Plan, and provides in principle support for the issues raised and directions proposed. In particular, it supports:-

 

1.   The GSC as a vital, objective and integrated means of achieving planning outcomes while keeping to the liveability principle of this Council;

2.   The thrust of the Regional and District Plans in spreading increased density across regions, especially to those areas that have capacity and infrastructure capability. In particular, the postponement of setting a 20-year residential target for Lane Cove is welcome. It is requested that the GSC acknowledge the current and proposed ‘heavy lifting’ being undertaken by the Lane Cove community, and that there will be limited capacity for future dwelling construction in Lane Cove once St Leonards South is completed;

3.   The elevated prominence of transport infrastructure in the Revised Plan. Council raises particular concern regarding the need to address the congestion of local through traffic, and supports the current and planned major road and rail upgrades;

4.   The continued direction to “protect and manage” employment lands, such as in Lane Cove West and St Leonards, especially from rezoning valuable commercial and industrial land to residential use. Future economic and job growth depends upon future employment lands being available in the long term;

5.   Protection and management of public lands and open space, particularly surrounding our rivers and Harbour;

6.   Recognition of the challenges of providing quality open space in urban areas. Council expects the State Government to recognise Council’s innovative open space projects detailed in this report. Recognition is expected in this Revised District Plan, and in the St Leonards/Crows Nest Station Precinct study.  Council again requests that the proposed St Leonards Plaza be included in the proposed Green Grid, or be attributed special significance and priority in the North District Plan, given its linchpin significance in revitalising the Precinct;

7.   The continued setting of jobs targets, especially in St Leonards. Council welcomes the greater opportunities “to grow jobs, housing and infrastructure” in the Collaboration Area and Priority Precinct of St Leonards and awaits more detailed plans from the Department of Planning on how this will be achieved while adhering to District liveability principles; and

8.   More flexibility in the proposed Affordable Rental Housing target to recognise the need to provide housing for “key workers” within 30 minutes journey to work.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council write to the Greater Sydney Commission supporting the Revised Draft North District Plan, and highlighting items of concern and support for:-

 

1.   The GSC as a vital, objective and integrated means of achieving planning outcomes while keeping to the liveability principle of this Council;

 

2.   The thrust of the Regional and District Plans in spreading increased density across regions, especially to those areas that have capacity and infrastructure capability. In particular, the postponement of setting a 20-year residential target for Lane Cove is welcome. It is requested that the GSC acknowledge the current and proposed ‘heavy lifting’ being undertaken by the Lane Cove community, and that there will be limited capacity for future dwelling construction in Lane Cove once St Leonards South is completed;

 

3.   The elevated prominence of transport infrastructure in the Revised Plan. Council raises particular concern regarding the need to address the congestion of local through traffic, and supports the current and planned major road and rail upgrades;

 

4.   The continued direction to “protect and manage” employment lands, such as in Lane Cove West and St Leonards, especially from rezoning valuable commercial and industrial land to residential use. Future economic and job growth depends upon future employment lands being available in the long term;

 

5.   Protection and management of public lands and open space, particularly surrounding our rivers and Harbour;

 

6.   Recognition of the challenges of providing quality open space in urban areas. Council expects the State Government to recognise Council’s innovative open space projects detailed in this report. Recognition is expected in this Revised District Plan, and in the St Leonards/Crows Nest Station Precinct study.  Council again requests that the proposed St Leonards Plaza be included in the proposed Green Grid, or be attributed special significance and priority in the North District Plan, given its linchpin significance in revitalising the Precinct;

 

7.   The continued setting of jobs targets, especially in St Leonards. Council welcomes the greater opportunities “to grow jobs, housing and infrastructure” in the Collaboration Area and Priority Precinct of St Leonards and awaits more detailed plans from the Department of Planning on how this will be achieved while adhering to District liveability principles; and

 

8.   More flexibility in the proposed Affordable Rental Housing target to recognise the need to provide housing for “key workers” within 30 minutes journey to work.

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Previous Council REPORT - Draft North District Plan

8 Pages

 

AT‑2View

Priorities and Actions - Revised Draft North District Plan Information Note

9 Pages

 

AT‑3View

Draft North District Plan (dated 26 October 2017)

118 Pages

Available Electronically

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 11 December 2017

Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan

 

 

Subject:          Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan    

Record No:    SU2871 - 70894/17

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):      Anthony Crichton 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The Greater Sydney Commission (GSC) has released the Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan (GSR Plan) in conjunction with the Draft North District Plan.  These plans are on public exhibition until 15 December 2017 and Council is requested to provide a response to both draft plans.

 

On exhibition concurrently with these draft Plans is the Draft Future Transport Strategy 2056, which is part of a package of plans produced by the State Government including:-

 

·    Draft Future Transport Strategy 2056;

·    Draft Greater Sydney Services and Infrastructure Plan;

·    Draft Regional Services and Infrastructure Plan;

·    Draft Tourism and Transport Plan; and

·    Draft Road Safety Plan.

 

The Greater Sydney Region Plan is a 20 year plan with a 40 year vision, covering the area bounded by the Hawkesbury River to the north, the Blue Mountains to the west and Wollondilly to the south.  If adopted, this plan would replace ‘A Plan for Growing Sydney’ and become the new Sydney Metropolitan Plan.

 

Four key issues or spatial elements for the region are addressed being population, housing and places, and jobs, transport connections and the landscape of the Greater Sydney basin.  The draft Plan also seeks to convert a vision for three cities into reality.

 

It will be delivered by the implementation of four key themes (infrastructure and collaboration, liveability, productivity and sustainability), 10 directions and 40 objectives to drive a series of strategies and actions.  Thirteen of the 40 objectives relate more specifically to the Lane Cove LGA and three of the objectives are directly applicable to St Leonards.

 

The plan sets district targets for housing supply and requires Councils to prepare housing strategies for an LGA or district.  The Commission has identified St Leonards as a priority precinct, however the progress made so far has demonstrated that the Lane Cove LGA has undertaken much of the ‘heavy lifting’ already and is well ahead of the State Government plans.  Given that Council responsibly met growth targets, it is requested that the GSC acknowledge the contribution already undertaken by the Lane Cove community and confirm that there will be limited capacity for ongoing growth in Lane Cove LGA as development opportunities become exhausted. 

 

Background

 

The purpose of the draft Plan is to develop an agreed 40 year vision and a 20 year plan to manage growth and change for Greater Sydney in the context of economic, social and environmental matters.  It will also inform district, local plans, the assessment of planning proposals, assist infrastructure agencies to prepare for growth and align their infrastructure plans to place-based outcomes.

 

This draft Plan is built on the vision where people of Greater Sydney live within 30 minutes of their jobs, education and health facilities, services and great places. This is consistent with the 10 Directions in Directions for a Greater Sydney which establish the aspirations for the region over the next 40 years and are a core component of the vision and a measure of the Plan's performance.

 

Figure 1: A Metropolis of Three Cities

Source: Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan: 2017, page 7

 

The draft Plan has been prepared by the Greater Sydney Commission concurrently with the Government’s ‘Future Transport 2056’ and Infrastructure NSW’s ‘State Infrastructure Strategy’ to align land use, transport and infrastructure outcomes for Greater Sydney for the first time in a generation.

 

Consultation has been broad and inclusive of community groups, councils and government agencies.  It recognized the need for greater collaboration between all spheres of government and the community.  All Councils in the North District participated and contributed towards the Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan.

 

Status of the Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan

 

The Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan provides guidance for draft District Plans and will inform councils when preparing draft Local Plans (LEPs and DCPs).


 

Structure of the Plan

 

The draft Greater Sydney Region Plan is divided into four key ‘themes’ being – Infrastructure and Collaboration, Liveability, Productivity and Sustainability.  Each of these sections or themes is further divided into objectives, strategies and actions.  Only some are relevant to Lane Cove.

These are discussed below and must be taken into account when a Planning Proposal is submitted and considered.

 

The figure shown below summarises the main elements of the plan:-

 

Figure 2: Plan on a Page

Source: Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan: 2017, page 11

Overall it shows St Leonards as being part of the Economic Corridor.  It also highlights that as well as being a Strategic Centre, St Leonards is now a health and education precinct.  The new Sydney Metro station at Crows Nest relates to the new metro line committed to by the State Government.

 

Discussion

 

The four key themes of the draft GSR Plan that are of particular importance to Lane Cove are discussed below in turn.

 

Infrastructure and collaboration

 

Objective 5 – Benefits of growth realized by collaboration of governments, communities and business

 

Strategies and Actions

·    Action 1: Identify, prioritise and deliver Collaboration Areas

 

Comment

The table below shows different approaches to supporting land use and infrastructure planning and delivery.

 

 

St Leonards has in particular been identified by the Commission, as a Collaboration Area.  It  has also been nominated by Department of Planning and Environment (DPE) as a ‘priority precinct’ (shown in Figure 3) which will encourage and accelerate targeted development focused on opportunity for urban renewal and housing diversity around a centre and transit node/railway station (St Leonards and Crows Nest).

 

Figure 3: Future housing: government programs and preferred locations for consideration

Source: Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan: 2017, page 53

 

 

 Liveability

 

Liveability can be defined as a liveable community ‘ that is safe, attractive, socially cohesive and inclusive and environmentally sustainable; with diverse housing linked by convenient public transport, walking and cycling infrastructure to employment, public open space, local shops, health and community services, and leisure and cultural opportunities’.

 

Objective 6 – Services and Infrastructure meet communities’ changing needs

 

Strategies and Actions

·    Strategy 6.1: Deliver social infrastructure to reflect the needs of the community now and in the future.

 

Comment

Council’s plans for St Leonards CBD and South residential developments aim to increase housing opportunities and deliver social and open space infrastructure to the local St Leonards community.  The over-station plaza coupled with new local parks and open spaces will provide open space for both residents and local businesses.  It will also deliver multi-purpose facilities which include child care centres and community halls.

 

Objective 7 – Communities are healthy, resilient and socially connected

 

Strategies and Actions

·    Strategy 7.1: Deliver inclusive places for people of all ages and abilities that support healthy, resilient and socially connected communities by:

providing walkable places with active street life and a human scale

co-locating schools, social, health, sporting, cultural and shared facilities.

 

Comment

Council’s approach to increased residential development in appropriate locations aim to deliver social and open space places including parks, plazas and meeting places with areas for children to play and families to rest and relax.  This development will provide liveable well-designed areas at ground level and a human scale.  The siting of this development in close proximity to public transport infrastructure i.e. St Leonards Railway Station and the future Crows Nest Metro will provide walkable places with active street life and connectivity.

 

The inclusion of community facilities, such as child care centres and community halls within residential development will allow for co-location of existing facilities.  Efforts will also be made to encourage  the State Education Department to co-locate schools with other social, health, sporting and cultural  facilities.

 

Objective 10 – Greater housing supply

 

Strategies and Actions

·    Action 2: Prepare housing strategies

 

Comment

The NSW Government has identified that 725,000 new homes will be needed across the five Sydney districts to meet demand based on current population projections to 2036.  A range of housing types, tenures and price points will be required to meet demand.

 


 

Figure 4: District Housing Targets

Source: Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan: 2017, page 51

 

The draft GSR Plan and the draft North District Plan requires Councils to prepare draft Housing Strategies for an LGA or district.  Council has already responded to the requests from the State Government for new development including significant re-development around the St Leonards area.  It has been a considered and principled approach which responds to both State Government Policy and to the community’s liveability vision.  Council has adopted a measured and carefully planned response to this challenge and seek to ensure that the principle of liveability is central to our decision making.

 

Furthermore, Lane Cove Council have responded to the draft Plans of the State Government by deliberately targeting re-development in St Leonards through its mixed use pilot projects. In conjunction with  the proposed St Leonards South residential development, new infrastructure delivery near an existing transport rail/bus hub has been facilitated in a manner that has had regard to the physical constraints of topography and capacity.

 

However, if a State Infrastructure Contribution (SIC) is sought from State Government, Council seeks re-assurances that it will not interfere with or affect the proposed infrastructure to be delivered by Council.

 

Strategies and Actions

·    Action 3: Develop 6-10 year housing targets

 

Comment

The draft Plan required council to work with the Commission to establish agreed 6-10 year housing targets for their LGA.  Councils are to investigate opportunities for supply and a diversity of housing particularly around centres to create more walkable neighbourhoods.  St Leonards South is already identified as suitable for housing supply beyond 10 years and located this development in close proximity to a transport interchange and a strategic centre, priority precinct and health and education precinct.

 

Lane Cove has led the way in planning and delivering the re-development of this priority precinct and can meet the 6-10 year housing targets ahead of even the adoption of the North District Plan and GSR Plan.

 

Given that Council is already well ahead of the current growth targets it is important that the Commission’s projections in the final plan acknowledge the limited capacity for further dwellings in the Lane Cove LGA.

 

Objective 11 – Housing is more diverse and affordable

 

Strategies and Actions

·    Strategy 11.1: Prepare Affordable Rental Housing Target Schemes

 

Comment

Lane Cove strongly supports this objective to provide housing choice and affordability for many key workers such as police, nurses and fire fighters who do not have access to affordable rental outcomes. 

 

This draft Plan recommends that the NSW State Government adopt Affordable Rental Housing Targets for very low to low income households in Greater Sydney as a mechanism to deliver a supply of affordable housing.  These targets would be then applied in defined future precincts that are entering the rezoning process.  The Commission will work with DPE to develop mechanisms required for the delivery of the proposed Affordable Rental Housing Targets.

 

Again this Council has been proactive in this area. Staff have met with senior management of NSW Planning and Environment to discuss Council’s commitment to provide “Key Worker Housing” in the proposed St Leonards South Precinct both for the benefit of current and future residents of this precinct.  The Department has indicated that it has no objection to the principle of amending SEPP 70 so as to allow Key Worker Housing (KWH) to be provided as housing units.

In the meantime, in the absence of an amended SEPP 70 mechanism, Council is able to finalise and exhibit Voluntary Planning Agreements to provide KWH in the form of units.  It is Council’s preference for the completed units to be transferred to Council in perpetuity and be managed by a registered Community Housing Provider.

 

However, previous submissions from the Community Housing providers have highlighted a critical deficit of KWH near transport nodes and health and infrastructure.

 

Strategies and Actions

·    Action 4: Work with the NSW DPE to implement Affordable Rental Housing Targets

 

Comment

Council agrees but urges that that DPE proceed promptly on this matter as this has been identified as a key priority by the NSW Premier.

 

Objective 12 – Great places that bring people together

 

Strategies and Actions

·    Strategy 12.1: Deliver great places by:-

prioritising people-friendly public realm and open space as a central organising design principle

recognising and balancing the dual function of streets as places for people and movement

providing fine grain urban form, high amenity and walkability

integrating social infrastructure to support social connections and provide a community hub

encouraging contemporary interpretation of heritage where possible

using a placed-based and collaborative approach throughout planning, design, development and management

 

Comment

These are considered to be important place management design principles (liveability) and have been utilized in the Lane Cove LGA and more recently in the planning and design of the St Leonards South residential precinct.

 

Strategies and Actions

·    Strategy 12.2: In Collaboration Areas, Priority Precincts and planning for centres:

investigate opportunities for precinct-based provision of adaptable car parking and infrastructure in lieu of private provision of car parking

ensure parking availability takes into account the level of access by public transport

consider the capacity for places to change and evolve and accommodate diverse activities over time

 

Comment

It is recognized that the these opportunities and actions need to be implemented to a realistic extent to enable urban environments to function on an ongoing sustainable basis.  The importance of these principles and actions will become more obvious as development occurs.

 

 Productivity

 

Objective 15 – The Eastern, GPOP and Western Economic Corridors are better connected and more competitive

 

Strategies and Actions

·    Strategy 15.2: Co-locate health, education, social and community facilities in strategic centres along economic corridors

 

Comment

The Eastern Economic Corridor extends from Macquarie Park through Chatswood, St Leonards to Sydney Airport is of national significance and currently contains approximately 775,000 jobs.  The DPE is undertaking a strategic planning investigation of the St Leonards and Crows Nest Station Precinct with Lane Cove Council to deliver on the job targets  set for the precinct.

St Leonards, as a Strategic Centre, Priority Precinct, Health and Education Precinct and Urban Renewal Corridor will play a major role in economic re-development.  The expansion of this centre will bring significant employment opportunities for the community but also planning and environmental challenges to this precinct.

 

Objective 21 – Internationally competitive health, education, research and innovation precincts

 

Strategies and Actions

·    Strategy 21.1: Develop and implement land use and infrastructure plans for health and education precincts that:

create the conditions for the continued co-location of health and education facilities,

and services to support the precinct and growth of the precincts

have high levels of accessibility

attract associated businesses, industries and commercialisation of research

facilitate housing opportunities for students and workers within 30 minutes of the precinct.

 

Comment

These health and education precincts will effectively connect the community’s healthcare services,

education and digital economy infrastructure.  They will deliver strong social, environmental and economic benefits.  The Lane Cove community is well placed to take advantage of this proximity to the health and education precinct.

 

Objective 22 – Investment and business activity in centres

 

Strategies and Actions

·    Strategy 22.1: Provide people with access to jobs, goods and services by:-

attracting significant investment and business activity in strategic centres to provide jobs growth

diversifying the range of activities in all centres

creating vibrant, safe places and quality public realm

balancing the efficient movement of people and goods with supporting the liveability of places on the road network

improving the walkability within and to the centre

completing and improving a safe and connected cycling network to and within the centre

improving public transport services to all strategic centres

creating the conditions for residential development within strategic centres and within walking distance, but not at the expense of the attraction and growth of jobs, retailing and services; where appropriate, strategic centres should define commercial cores informed by an assessment of their need.

                                                      

Comment

Other than the Metro Station at Crows Nest/St Leonards there are no specific infrastructure projects which will improve transport options specifically for the Lane Cove LGA. In general, the key issues in relation to the plan are:-

·    While the new transport strategy recognises the importance of public transport in the post 10 year time frame it continues to pursue commitment to urban motorways in the 1 -10 year period;

·    Absence of reference to upgrading of Sydney’s ferry fleet and increasing the number of ferry wharves.

 

There is a need for this to be addressed in the St Leonards and Crows Nest Station Land Use and Implementation Plan.  Transport networks at St Leonards and Crows Nest will be substantially upgraded by the construction of the new Metro line and Crows Nest Metro Station.

 

The St Leonards South Residential Precinct will further build on this work by providing new pedestrian and cycle infrastructure linking to the existing train and future Metro stations.

 

 Sustainability

 

Objective 31 – Public open space is accessible, protected and enhanced

 

Strategies and Actions

·    Strategy 31.1: Maximise the use of existing open space and protect, enhance and expand public open space by:-

investigating opportunities to expand a network of diverse, accessible, high quality open space that responds to the needs and values of communities as populations grow

investigating opportunities to provide new open space so that all residential areas are within 400 metres of open space and all high density residential areas are within 200 metres of open space

requiring large urban renewal initiatives to demonstrate how access to high quality and diverse local open space is maintained or improved

planning new neighbourhoods with a sufficient quantity of new open space

delivering shared and co-located sports and recreational facilities including shared school grounds and repurposed golf courses

delivering on, or complementing, the Greater Sydney Green Grid.

 

Comment

Access to high quality open space is becoming increasingly important as higher housing densities, more compact housing and changing work environments develop.  This is particularly applicable  where densities are proposed to be higher i.e. St Leonards South, Rosenthal Avenue, Pinaroo Park.

 

Conclusion

 

The draft Greater Sydney Region Plan is a vital, objective and integrated means of achieving planning outcomes while keeping to the liveability principle of this Council.  It provides a new and welcome approach to considering and planning the Greater Sydney Region as a whole and Council also welcomes the State Government’s commitment to preparing a 20 year plan with a 40 year vision.

 

The structure of the draft Plan which incorporates four themes, 10 directions and 40 objectives has produced a reasonably compact package of actions and strategies which can be comprehended and implemented by Councils and State Government and authorities.

 

The concept of developing a metropolis of three 30-minute cities may be difficult to realize given the history of delays in delivering transport infrastructure within this city over many decades.  However, with an agreed vision and integrated focus by the State for the first time, based on evidence-based planning and infrastructure funding, the comprehensive nature of the draft Plan and the preparedness to link infrastructure, growth and collaboration between government, community and business is supported.

 

Notwithstanding this support by Council, the Commission is asked to acknowledge in the final plan that Council is already well ahead of the current growth targets and to acknowledge the limited capacity for further dwellings in the Lane Cove LGA.

 

Specifically, Lane Cove Council supports:-

 

·    The continued direction to “protect and manage” employment lands, such as in Lane Cove West and St Leonards, especially from rezoning valuable commercial and industrial land to residential use. Future economic and job growth depends upon future employment lands being available in the long term;

·    Protection and management of public lands and open space, particularly surrounding our rivers and Harbour;

·    Recognition of the challenges of providing quality open space in urban areas. Council expects the State Government to recognise Council’s innovative open space projects detailed in this report. Recognition is expected in this Revised District Plan, and in the St Leonards/Crows Nest Station Precinct study.  Council again requests that the proposed St Leonards Plaza be included in the proposed Green Grid, or be attributed special significance and priority in the North District Plan, given its linchpin significance in revitalising the Precinct; and

·    Reiteration of an Affordable Rental Housing target, with emphasis on providing housing for “key workers” within 30 minutes journey to work.

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council make a submission to Greater Sydney Commission in support of this plan whilst highlighting the issues raised in the report.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Information Note - Objectives, Strategies and Actions of Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan

9 Pages

 

AT‑2View

Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan

170 Pages

Available Electronically

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 11 December 2017

Review of Community Strategic Plan - Lane Cove 2025 and Community Engagement Strategy

 

 

Subject:          Review of Community Strategic Plan - Lane Cove 2025 and Community Engagement Strategy    

Record No:    SU6891 - 70256/17

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Craig Dalli 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The Integrated Planning and Reporting (IPR) Framework for NSW Councils requires each Council to have as the core of its framework a long term Community Strategic Plan with at least a ten (10) year horizon. As the horizon for the current Community Strategic Plan (CSP) for the Lane Cove Community is 2025, it is required under S402 of the Local Government Act that the CSP be reviewed by 30 June 2018 and extended further into the future.

 

Therefore, this report will outline the requirements for the review, recommend that the CSP be extended through to 2035 and propose a Community Engagement Strategy to engage the Community in review of the CSP.

 

Background

 

In October 2009, the NSW Government endorsed an Integrated Planning and Reporting (IPR) Framework for local councils, requiring each council to develop and have in place:-

·    a Community Strategic Plan (CSP);

·    a Community Engagement Strategy that sets out how each council will engage its community when developing its Community Strategic Plan;

·    a Resourcing Strategy that includes a;

Long Term Financial Plan; 

Workforce Management Strategy; and

An Asset Management Policy, strategy and plans.

·    a Delivery Program; and

·    an Operational Plan, including a statement of revenue policy, and a detailed annual budget

 

Councils are also required to have in place the following reporting processes:

·    an Annual Report outlining achievements against the Delivery program;

·    audited Financial Statements as part of the Annual Report; and

·    an End of Term report by the outgoing council which outlines achievements in relation to the civic leadership, social, economic, and environmental (State of the Environment report) objectives in the Community Strategic Plan, presented to the final meeting of that council.

 

The Framework is illustrated by the following diagram:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework

 

https://www.olg.nsw.gov.au/sites/default/files/iprframework.jpg

 

The Community Strategic Plan identifies the community’s main priorities and aspirations for the future, and must address social, environmental, economic and civic leadership issues. It may include priorities and aspirations which fall to State or Federal government agencies or the non-Government sector to meet. The Community Strategic Plan will therefore also identify opportunities for partnerships and may include issues with a broader regional focus.

 

The Community Strategic Plan must include:

·    a community vision statement

·    a series of strategic objectives for the community

·    strategies for achieving each objective

·    assessment methods for determining whether the objectives are being achieved.

 

The Community Strategic Plan normally must be reviewed every four years by each new council following ordinary local government elections. As this is a three (3) year term, it will be reviewed again after 2020 Election. Ordinarily the review will need to be completed before 30 June following the new council’s election, for the ensuing council term and therefore, Council is required to undertake the current review of the CSP by 30 June 2018. The CSP must have an horizon of at least ten (10) years so its proposed to extend to Lane Cove 2035.

 

 


 

Community Engagement Strategy

 

Section 402 of the Local Government Act also requires that Council must develop and implement a Community Engagement Strategy in order to engage the local community and other identified stakeholders, such as State agencies and community organisations, in the development and review of the Community Strategic Plan.

 

Council at its meeting of 17 July 2017 in the Phase 1 review of Policies undertook a review of its Community Engagement Policy. The purpose of this Policy is to outline the principles that Council will follow in undertaking community engagement and consultation, and to establish a consistent approach and standard for community engagement activities.

 

In accordance with legislation and Councils’ Community Engagement Policy, a Community Engagement Strategy has been prepared that outlines how Council will involve the community in the review of the Community Strategic Plan, by providing a range of ways for the community and key stakeholders to get involved in the review process.

 

Council’s role is to lead community engagement to identify long-term objectives of the community, strategies to achieve these objectives and the levels of service the community expects.  The methods chosen need to maximise opportunities to go out to the community as well as inviting the community to come to Council. In line with Council’s Consultation processes, this framework will be used to ensure a range of engagement including:

 

LEVEL OF PARTICIPATION

DESCRIPTION

 

 

INFORM

Providing balanced and objective information to help the

community understand problems, alternatives, opportunities and/or solutions

CONSULT

Obtain public feedback on alternatives and/or decisions

INVOLVE

Work directly with the community throughout the process to ensure that public concerns and aspirations are consistently understood and considered

 

Community engagement opportunities will be provided as follows:

 

INFORM

 

E-Newsletters

Council will distribute e-newsletters to members of the community who have registered with Council to find out about latest news, consultations and events associated with Council activities.

 

Public Exhibitions

Large exhibition banners will be developed based around the six (6) key planning themes in the current CSP.  These banners will be displayed in Council’s Administration Building, Lane Cove Library and other appropriate locations including the Plaza during exhibitions.

 

Newsletter

The Quarterly newsletter developed and sent to every household in Lane Cove will include notifications of the review of the CSP commencing and status and inviting the community to participate in any forums or fill out a feedback response form from Council’s website or at the Public Exhibitions.

 


 

Advertisement

An advertisement will be placed in the local newspaper advising the community that the review of the CSP is commencing and that they can participate in forums or fill out a feedback response form from Council’s website.

 

Feedback on the Consultation

Council is committed to informing the community on the progress of consultation throughout the review of the CSP.  In order that each persons views are considered a document will be developed and published which will show the flow of inputs from the consultations on the review of goals, objectives and strategies.  This document will be published on Council’s website.

 

CONSULT

 

Community Survey

 

The purpose of the survey is to find out what the community values about Lane Cove and what they would like to see for the future. 

 

The community survey will ask questions such as:-

 

1.   What are the 3 things you value about living in Lane Cove? 

2.   What are the 3 things you would you like to see in the future of Lane Cove? 

3.   Please rank the 6 Planning Themes as they are most important to you?

 

The community survey will be:-

 

·    sent with an E-Newsletter;

·    sent with Council’s quarterly newsletter;

·    available at the public exhibitions including in Council’s Administration Building and Lane Cove Library;

·    available at appropriate community centres and facilities; and

·    available online.

 

Workshops/ Community Forums

At least two (2) community workshops will be conducted one (1) being held during daytime and one (1) in the evening to inform the community of the CSP review and proposed themes, goals and strategies and to secure community feedback.

 

Additionally, an Exhibition will be conducted in the Plaza on a weekday and a Saturday for the same purposes. Feedback Response forms will be available at these events for the community to provide comments.

 

Telephone Interviews

Council staff will conduct telephone interviews to randomly consult the community on the questions from the community survey.

 

Advisory Committees

Council Advisory Committees will be engaged during the consultations particularly in relation to their respective focus areas and expertise.

 

Internal Workshops

Workshops will be conducted with Councillors and staff to consult them on their wants and values for the future of Lane Cove.

Government Agencies

Government agencies will be consulted during the review process particularly the Department of Planning and Greater Sydney Commission and service delivery agencies such as health, education and transport.

 

INVOLVE

 

Deliberative Polling

Council will appoint an external independent company to conduct deliberative polling with participants drawn from a random and representative sample to receive strategic feedback that the goals, objectives and strategies respond to the needs and values received in the consultations are reflective of public opinion.

 

Workshops/ Community Forums

At least two (2) community workshops one (1) being open during daytime and one (1) in the evening will be held to inform the community of the CSP review and proposed themes, goals and strategies and to secure community feedback. Additionally, public exhibitions will be conducted in the Plaza on a weekday and a Saturday providing opportunity for information sharing and feedback.

 

General Promotion and Publicity

A dedicated page for the CSP will be setup on Council’s website and will include background supporting material, updates and feedback as well as the community survey.

 

Conclusion

 

Council is committed to engaging the community as far and wide as possible in the review of the Community Strategic Plan, as it is a plan developed to reflect the community’s long term goals and aspirations for Lane Cove.

 

The Community Engagement Strategy outlined in this report is reflective of Council’s commitment to conducting quality consultation that contributes to effective, equitable and inclusive consultation with the community.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.   Receive and note the information;

 

2.   Extend the horizon for the Community Strategic Plan – Lane Cove 2025 to 2035; and

 

3.   Endorse the Community Engagement Strategy for the review of the Community Strategic Plan – Lane Cove 2025, as outlined in this report.

 

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 11 December 2017

1st Quarter Review of the 2017-2018 Delivery Program and Operational Plan

 

 

Subject:          1st Quarter Review of the 2017-2018 Delivery Program and Operational Plan    

Record No:    SU238 - 66775/17

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Craig Dalli 

 

 

Executive Summary

This report outlines the 1st Quarter progress towards achieving the projects listed in the adopted 2017-18 Delivery Program and Operational Plan.  It is recommended that the report be received and noted.

 

Discussion

Council’s adopted 2017-18 Delivery Program and Operational Plan details the projects proposed to be undertaken during the financial year in order to meet the goals and objectives of Community Strategic Plan Lane Cove 2025. Council reports quarterly on the progress towards completing the projects and achieving the targets for the adopted performance measurements. The 1st Quarter Review of the 2017-18 Delivery Program and Operational Plan is shown attached as AT-1

 

The projects in the Quarterly Review are listed by the responsible Council Division and where the project has a completion date the ‘Action Status’ column graphically demonstrates the progress towards completion. The Review also includes a comment on the status of each project.

 

The Quarterly Review also provides a report on progress towards achieving the targets set for performance measurement for each Division of Council. A cumulative figure for performance measurement is shown so that performance can be tracked each quarter towards achieving the required target.

The highlights of the projects either commenced or completed for the 1st quarter include:-

·    Commencement on site of work for the Rosenthal Project (September);

·    Ordinary election of Council and induction of new Council (September-October);

·    Preparation of Annual Financial Statements for 2016-17 (July-September);

·    Adoption of Disability Inclusion Plan (October);

·    Launch of Woodlawn Waste Recovery Facility (October)

·    Community Consultation:-

Park designs and proposed names for Pinnaroo Park;

Draft Disability Inclusion Action Plan

·    Financial Assistance for Community Groups for 2017-18 (September);

·    Lane Cove Festival Events including Rotary Fair and Coffee Carnivale;

·    NAIDOC Week;

·    Sponsorship of Lane Cove Fun Run; and

·    Bike Week.

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the 1st Quarter Review of the 2017-18 Delivery Program and Operational Plan be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

1st Quarter Review of the 2017-18 Delivery Program and Operational Plan

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 11 December 2017

Council Meeting Schedule - 2018

 

 

Subject:          Council Meeting Schedule - 2018    

Record No:    SU1915 - 70057/17

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Craig Dalli 

 

 

 

The Ordinary Council Meeting Schedule for 2018 is proposed as follows:-

 

Monday, 19 February 2018

 

Monday, 20 August 2018

Monday, 19 March 2018

 

Monday, 17 September 2018

Monday, 16 April 2018

 

Monday, 15 October 2018 *

Monday, 21 May 2018

 

Monday, 19 November 2018

Monday, 18 June 2018

 

Monday, 10 December 2018

Monday, 23 July 2018 #

 

 

*    Subject to change depending on scheduling of the 2018 LGNSW Annual Conference.

#    4th Monday of the month due to July school holidays

 

No meetings are scheduled for January 2018.

 

If required an Inspection Committee will meet on the Saturday preceding the Ordinary Council Meeting.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the Council Meeting Schedule for 2018 be adopted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

  


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 11 December 2017

2016 Census Update

 

 

Subject:          2016 Census Update    

Record No:    SU5028 - 67506/17

Division:         Human Services Division

Author(s):      Jane Gornall 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council will recall that the last Australian census was held in 2016. The Australian Bureau of Statistics has commenced to release information arising from the Census. This Report provides some general statistics about Lane Cove and does some comparison against the 2011 data. In addition the NSW Government Department of Planning has recently released some Population and Housing projections, some of this data is also in this Report. It is recommended that the report be received and noted.

 

Discussion

 

General

 

The following table gives a insight into the key statistics of Lane Cove. As can be seen from the Table below there has been an increase of 5,541 people within Lane Cove. There has been an increase of 1,261 families and 2,268 dwellings.

 

Table 1 - Key Statistics

Lane Cove

2011

2016

Difference

 

Numbers

%

People

31,510

37,051

 +5,541

17.58

Male

15,258

17,737

+2,479

16.25

Female

16,252

19,314

+3,062

18.84

Median Age

37

36

-1

 

 

 

Families

8,396

9, 657

 +1,261

15.02

Avg.children per family

1.8

1.8

 

 

 

Private Dwellings

13,279

15,547

+ 2,268

17.08

Avg. People per household

2.5

2.5

0

0.00

Median Weekly Household income

2181

2376

+195

8.94

Median monthly mortgage repayments

2734

2600

-134

-4.90

Median weekly rent

420

520

+ 100

23.81

Avg.  Motor vehicles per dwelling

1.5

1.5

0

0.00

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics 

 

 

 

.

Table 2 - Age profile, Lane Cove LGA 2016 compared to 2011, and Lane Cove LGA 2016 compared to NSW 2016

 

 

 

Interestingly the median age of its population has dropped from 37 (2011) to 36 (2016) with the New South Wales remaining the same at 38 and the Australian median age increasing to 38.

 

Children aged 0-14 years made up 18.5% of the population as compared to 18.9% in 2011; people aged 65 years and older made up 13.7% of the population compared to 13.4% in 2011.

 

Housing

 

The New South Wales Department of Planning and Environment has recently released the following data in relation to population growth based on housing supply. Council’s own data of residential construction closely aligns for the period 2011-2016, however for the period 2016-21, the estimate appears conservative as there are some 2,300 apartments in the process of DA assessment or under construction, making the projected number of dwellings closer to 16,700 by 2021, with a population of approximately 43,000.

 

Table 3 - Population, household and dwelling projections, Lane Cove LGA, 2016-2036

Measure

2011

2016

2021

2026

2031

2036

Population

33,250

37,350

40,750

43,750

48,100

52,300

Households

12,900

14,450

15,700

16,900

18,650

20,400

Average Household Size

2.53

2.54

2.55

2.55

2.53

2.51

Implied Dwellings

13,900

15,550

16,900

18,150

20,050

21,950

Source: New South Wales Government 2017

Table 4 – Type of Dwelling

 

Dwelling structure

2016

 

2011

 

Increase/ decrease

2016 NSW %

Separate house

5,717

42%

5,917

49.8%

-200

66.4%

Semi-detached, row or townhouse

747

5.5%

707

6.0%

+47

12.2%

Flat or apartment

6,984

51.6%

5,183

43.6%

+1,801

19.9%

Other dwelling

19

0.1

34

0.3%

-15

0.9%

Within the dwelling reporting, 90.9% of private dwellings were occupied and 9.1% were unoccupied. This compares to 92.7% occupied in 2011 and 7.3% being unoccupied.

 

In 2016, private dwellings in Lane Cove 29.9% were owned outright, 32.6 % were owned with a mortgage and 34.9% were rented. This compares to 33.3% owned outright; 33.5% owned with a mortgage and 30.6% rented in 2011.

 

Education

 

In 2016, 30.5% of people were attending an educational institution – 25.9% were in primary school; 22.4% in secondary school and 26.8 % in a tertiary or technical institution. This compares to the 2011 figures of 30.5% of people were attending an educational institution – 26.8% were in primary school; 21.5% in secondary school and 27.3 % in a tertiary or technical institution.

 

Households

 

Lane Cove remains slightly under the NSW and Australian average for the number of family households.

 

Table 5 – Household Composition

Household Composition

Lane Cove

%

New South Wales

%

Australia

%

Family households

9,512

70.3

1,874,524

72.0

5,907,625

71.3

Single (or lone) person households

3,407

25.2

620,778

23.8

2.023,542

24.4

Group households

608

4.5

109,004

4.2

354,917

4.3

 

In 2011, 69.5% were family households, 25.4 % were single households and 5.1% were group households.

 

The New South Wales Government has released the following projections for Household type.

Table 6 - Household type projections, Lane Cove LGA, 2016-2036

Household Type

2016

2021

2026

2031

2036

Couple only

3,500

3,750

4,000

4,400

4,850

Couple with children

4,950

5,400

5,750

6,250

6,700

Single parent

1,000

1,100

1,200

1,350

1,500

Other family households

150

150

150

200

200

Multiple-family households

350

400

400

450

500

Total family households

9,950

10,850

11,550

12,650

13,750

Lone person

3,800

4,150

4,550

5,150

5,750

Group

700

700

750

800

900

Total

14,450

15,700

16,900

18,650

20,400

Source: New South Wales Government 2017

 

 


 

Table 7 - Family Composition

 

Family Composition

Lane Cove

%

New South Wales

%

Australia

%

Couple family without children

3,760

38.9

709,524

36.6

2,291,987

37.8

Couple family with children

4,722

48.9

887,358

45.7

2,716,224

44.7

One parent family

1,010

10.5

310,906

16.0

959,543

15.8

Other family

171

1.8

32,438

1.7

102,559

1.7

 

In 2016, the families in Lane Cove (A) (Local Government Areas), 48.9% were couple families with children, 38.9% were couple families without children and 10.5% were one parent families. This compares to the 2011 Census figures of 49.5% were couple families with children, 37% were couple families without children and 11.2 % were one parent families.

 

Cultural Backgrounds

 

In Lane Cove 69.1% of people only spoke English at home. The following table lists the Languages other than English spoken at home in 2016. In 2011, 74.8% of people only spoke English at home. The other languages spoken at home included Cantonese 3.1%, Mandarin 2.9%, Spanish 1.1%, Japanese 0.9% and Italian 0.9%.

 

Table 8 - Languages spoken at home– other than English

Language – other than English

Lane Cove

%

New South Wales

%

Australia

%

Mandarin

1,687

4.7

239,945

3.2

596,711

2.5

Cantonese

1,130

3.1

143,333

1.9

280,943

1.2

Spanish

457

1.3

63,527

0.8

140,817

0.6

Japanese

438

1.2

17,319

0.2

55,966

0.2

Persian

415

1.2

22,044

0.3

58,313

0.2

 

Employment

 

Table 9 – Employment

 

People who reported being in the labour force, 15 years and over

Lane Cove (A)

%

New South Wales

%

Australia

%

Worked full-time

13,289

65.8

2,134,521

59.2

6,623,065

57.7

Worked part-time

5,208

25.8

1,071,151

29.7

3,491,503

30.4

Away from work

799

4.0

174,654

4.8

569,276

5.0

Unemployed

885

4.4

225,546

6.3

787,452

6.9

In 2016, there were 20,181 people who reported being in the labour force in the week before Census night in Lane Cove. Of these 65.8% were employed full time, 25.8% were employed part-time and 4.4% were unemployed. This is a large increase from 2011, were 17,473 people reported being in the labour force in the week before Census night – of these 65.2% were employed full time, 26.6 % were employed part-time and 3.7 % were unemployed.

 

Table 10 – Travel to Work

 

Top responses -
Employed people, 15 years and over

Lane Cove (A)

%

New South Wales

%

Australia

%

Car, as driver

8,368

43.4

1,953,399

57.8

6,574,571

61.5

Bus

3,573

18.5

133,903

4.0

323,201

3.0

Train

1,215

6.3

252,786

7.5

488,012

4.6

Worked at home

1,055

5.5

163,026

4.8

503,582

4.7

Walked only

856

4.4

130,957

3.9

370,427

3.5

People who travelled to work by public transport

6,082

31.5

540,215

16.0

1,225,668

11.5

People who travelled to work by car as driver or passenger

9,512

49.3

2,182,854

64.6

7,305,271

68.4

In Lane Cove on the day of the Census, the most common methods of travel to work for employed people were: Car, as driver 43.4%, Bus 18.5% and Train 6.3%. Other common responses were worked at home 5.5% and walked only 4.4%. On the day, 31.5% of employed people used public transport (train, bus, ferry, tram/light rail) as at least one of their methods of travel to work and 49.3% used car (either as driver or as passenger).

 

Table 11 - Amount of unpaid work

 

 

Unpaid work - People 15 years and over

Lane Cove (A)

%

New South Wales

%

Australia

%

Did unpaid domestic work (last week)

22,485

76.5

4,127,723

67.7

13,143,914

69.0

Cared for child/children (last two weeks)

8,631

29.4

1,659,250

27.2

5,259,400

27.6

Provided unpaid assistance to a person with a disability (last two weeks)

3,124

10.6

709,415

11.6

2,145,203

11.3

Did voluntary work through an organisation or group (last 12 months)

7,302

24.9

1,103,790

18.1

3,620,726

19.0

 

In Lane Cove of people aged 15 years and over, 76.5% did unpaid domestic work in the week before the Census. During the two weeks before the Census, 29.4% provided care for children and 10.6% assisted family members or others due to a disability, long term illness or problems related to old age. In the year before the Census, 24.9% of people did voluntary work through an organisation or a group.


 

Conclusion

 

The 2016 Census provides useful information on the changing profile of the community. Further updates will be provided to Council as they become available.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Gornall

Executive Manager - Human Services

Human Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 11 December 2017

Keep NSW Beautiful Blue Star Awards - Waste Less Recycle More

 

 

Subject:          Keep NSW Beautiful Blue Star Awards - Waste Less Recycle More    

Record No:    SU6278 - 69946/17

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):      David Wilson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council has recently received a Highly Commended Award in the category of Waste Less Recycle More for our Multi Unit Development (Residential Units) – Waste Avoidance Program from Keep NSW Beautiful.

 

The Award is recognition for the positive waste management outcomes delivered over the past 2 years, which has resulted in a significant reduction in waste dumping and a greater awareness of our waste services, greater awareness of reusing or donating of unwanted items and overall compliance. It is recommended that the report be received and noted.

 

Background

The Blue Star Sustainability Awards are Keep NSW Beautiful’s new sustainability awards program. Through these awards, recognition of the hard work of NSW citizens who promote responsible environmental management in their local area is celebrated.

Keep NSW Beautiful’s state that being truly ‘sustainable’ means addressing the entire spectrum of environmental, social and economic factors. The awards recognise civic pride, community spirit and future planning in establishing the best projects and programs to come out of NSW communities.

The Awards celebrate Keep NSW Beautiful’s core values of:-

·      Championing environmental sustainability;

·      Introducing positive behaviour change into communities;

·      Sustainable success through community engagement and education; and

·      Adoptable, transferable projects that could change communities across the state.

Discussion

 

The Waste Avoidance Project, funded by the NSW EPA’s Better Waste and Recycling Fund, began at Lane Cove Council in January 2016. The aim of the project has been to reduce illegal dumping outside multi-unit dwellings (MUDs), with the intention to improve street amenity and reduce costs to council from managing illegal dumps. Secondary intended outcomes were greater diversion of waste from landfill into reuse or recycling.

 

Since the commencement of the project, the community has responded positively with up to 40% fewer dumps in the vicinity of MUDs compared to 2015.

 

Key Findings

 

The methods used to encourage residents to stop dumping waste items illegally and to embrace  an attitude that kerbside dumping was not common and that council provides a range of readily available waste management solutions . To do this, council implemented a combination of preventative (promotional) and pro-active intervention measures to significantly reduce dumping in MUD hot spot areas.

 

Key findings were that:

 

·         Positive reminders facilitated behaviour change. Positive reminders were a combination of  signage or flyers about Council Clean Up and waste avoidance options, or coupled to regulatory reminders and warnings. Positive information at any stage appealed to residents who desire to do the right thing. It is beneficial in these circumstances to provide this as a motivation for behaviour change, particularly when a resident may not be aware of preferred practices to start with; “When one knows better, they can do better.” Overall results from this method showed Council Clean Up booking rates increasing as illegal dumping decreased.

 

·         Residents were quick to change behaviours; this was evident in 60% self-removal rate within 10 days following individual intervention, and substantial reduction of 37% in dumping over time after consecutive interventions.

 

·         Intervention is most effective when applied immediately. The immediacy of a response after an incident occurs reinforces to the community that new social expectations apply and will be upheld; 33% of dumps disappeared immediately (within 24hours) after being dumped if treated that same day with enforcement tape, stickers and flyers in letterboxes. A similar response was seen when stickers and tape only were used. The rapid response from council could be seen by the whole community. (Regular patrols of hotspot areas are necessary to establish consistency.)

 

·         A personalized letter to every unit within a whole unit block had longer lasting effect. In every instance where a tailored letter was delivered, addressed to the unit occupant and articulating locations of dumps in relation to that property, dumping ceased. The letters contributed to 100% reduction in illegal dumping at various repeat dumping localities. These were properties where dumping had been continual over a number of years.

 

·         Simple actions can have great impact, suggesting that once residents are aware of the correct processes and feel compelled to abide by these (through external motivation such as threat of regulation or knowledge of ease of practice) behaviours can rapidly change.

 

Conclusion

 

The outcomes of the project to date show that timely and continued contact with our local stakeholders (property owners, residents renting, real estate agents, waste contractors and Council staff) is essential.

 

Results to date indicate that sustained short term community awareness of waste management practices has increased, but continued promotion and raising of awareness is required in the longer term.

 

The staff in the waste section are to be commended for their work in delivering these outcomes and for receiving this award from Keep NSW Beautiful.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 11 December 2017

Lane Cove Plaza 40th Anniversary

 

 

Subject:          Lane Cove Plaza 40th Anniversary    

Record No:    SU4985 - 71062/17

Division:         Human Services Division

Author(s):      Corinne Dickinson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Lane Cove Plaza was officially opened in November 1977.

 

Last month Council celebrated the Plaza being the heart of Lane Cove for 40 years. This report details the range of activities organised by Council to help mark the occasion. It is recommended that the report be received and noted.

 

Background

 

It has been 15 years since Council celebrated the Plaza’s 25th Anniversary. The 40th Anniversary has provided the opportunity to remind the community of the Plaza’s history but also to celebrate its unique role within the heart of the village. Long-term residents and businesses can reflect on how much has changed while newer residents can find out more about the unique background to the Plaza they know and love today.

 

To acknowledge these different audiences and the continued growth of Lane Cove, a range of different materials were developed to mark the 40th Anniversary.

 

Discussion

 

A commemorative publication (AT-1) has been produced and is available online and in hard copy from Lane Cove Civic Centre and Lane Cove Library. This will continue to be a valuable resource until the Plaza celebrates its 50th Anniversary in 2027.

 

Supporting activities included the display of banners along Longueville Road; a free talk in Lane Cove Library; an exhibition of Plaza-inspired artworks from the Municipal Art Collection; publication of the 1977 ABC news clip on Council’s website; free commemorative pins; a timeline and photographic display around Lloyd Rees Bandstand; and a giant heart being installed in the middle of the Plaza green for the community to interact with.

 

Conclusion

 

November 2017 has provided the opportunity to commemorate the unique history of the Plaza and celebrate its role as the heart of Lane Cove for 40 years.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Gornall

Executive Manager - Human Services

Human Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

A4 Booklet 40 Anniversary of Lane Cove Plaza 2017

12 Pages

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 11 December 2017

Amendments to the Environmental Planning and Assessment  Act 2017

 

 

Subject:          Amendments to the Environmental Planning and Assessment  Act 2017    

Record No:    SU4720 - 71591/17

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):      Michael Mason 

 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

During 2017 the Department of Planning undertook workshops with major stakeholders throughout the State as part of their review of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act (EP&A Act).

 

Subsequently, a revised bill was introduced to Parliament in October 2017. The Bill passed on 15 November 2017 with many of the new provisions to have a staged commencement in the first quarter of 2018.

 

The purpose of this report will be to outline the major changes to the legislation and potential implications for Council. It is recommended the report be received and noted.

 

Discussion

 

Following a review of the EP&A Act by the NSW Department of Planning which included stakeholder engagement, the following amendments have been made to the Act and will be implemented on a staged basis from early 2018;

 

Introducing a more contemporary structure and language including:-

 

·    Dividing the Act into 10 parts and using decimal numbering for all provisions;

·    Relocating some provisions to regulations;

·    Simpler language; and

·    Introducing greater opportunity for consultation and identifying issues of concern.

 

Introducing new objects to the Act that will seek to promote:-

 

·    Good design and amenity of the built environment;

·    Sustainable management of built and cultural heritage; and

·    Proper construction and maintenance of buildings and occupants.

 

Enhancing Community participation in the Planning System

 

This is to be achieved by requiring all planning authorities (Councils) to prepare community participation plans:-

 

·    Stating mandatory minimum standards for community participation;

·    Identifying 8 community participation principles; and

·    Requiring all decision makers to give reasons for their decisions. This will include decisions by the IHAP and Council issued approvals and refusals under delegated authority.

 

Integrating the strategic planning roles for Councils (LEPs and DCPs), the Greater Sydney Commission and the State

 

This is to be achieved by each Council preparing Local Strategic Planning Statements that articulate:-

 

·    The vision for land use in the local area;

·    Align with the District and Regional plans and the Community Strategic Plan ie proposed Community Strategic Plan – Lane Cove 2035;

·    The shape and evolution of future LEP and DCP controls; and

·    Confirm the role of councillors.

 

The regulations will also require each Council to undertake an LEP health check every 5 years and introduce a standard format for Development Control Plans.

 

Building confidence in approvals and the Complying Development standards

 

The regulations will seek to develop controls and guidelines that:-

 

·    Permit Councils to impose a compliance  levy on Complying Development Certificates issued by Certifiers;

·    Permit Councils to issue a 7 day Stop Work Notice to investigate complaints of unauthorized works;

·    Permit Councils to issue a deterrence fee for retrospective changes to approvals;

·    Strengthen Regional Planning Panels in line with IHAP changes; and

·    Independent Planning Commission formerly the Planning Assessment Commission (PAC) will change its functions and hearing processes.

 

Promoting greater efficiencies when dealing with State Authorities and agencies

 

The Department of Planning (Secretary) will have the power to “step in” and mediate or determine a State response important development proposal where there is conflicting or competing advice provided by two or more State agencies.

 

The new Act also terminates the use of the former Part 3A pathway provisions where developers could provide an unsolicited proposal directly to the Minister.

 

Facilitating better infrastructure delivery

 

The new Act will in broad terms enable:-

 

·    Part 5 concurrences by Councils and Agencies where formal assessment under the DA (Part 4) is not required;

·    Greater clarity on Ministerial Directions regarding Planning Agreements; and

·    Permit Special Infrastructure Contributions for a range of developments including DAs and Complying Development.

 

Conclusion

 

Staff are currently working through the detail of the amending legislation, regulations and guidelines to enable compliance.  Once this has been completed, staff will be in a better position to ascertain impact of the amendments to the current EP&A on the local context and our community.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 11 December 2017

Dockless Bike Share Schemes

 

 

Subject:          Dockless Bike Share Schemes    

Record No:    SU2020 - 72029/17

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):      Craig Wrightson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

In recent months numerous dockless bike-share schemes have commenced operations in Sydney. These differ from traditional schemes in that bikes are able to be deposited anywhere when a rider has arrived at their destination, ready to be ridden by the next rider from that same location.  Whilst this increases the convenience and attractiveness of such schemes, it has led to issues of bikes being left in inappropriate or dangerous locations. It is recommended guidelines and standards for operators be developed through NSROC, so they apply equally across councils.

 

Discussion

 

It is acknowledged that a successful bike share scheme is consistent with many Council strategic objectives, to reduce congestion, increase sustainability, increase levels of physical activity in the community and enhance social cohesion.  However, it is also acknowledged that a number of issues, both strategic and local, arise from the low level of control afforded to dockless bike share schemes.

 

The key issues that are currently being faced by Council are as follows:-

 

·         The random nature in how the bikes are left parked in public spaces and general public areas, creating safety hazards and blocking footpath access - access to transport such as buses, trains and ferries and blocking or interfering with access to residential properties and businesses;

 

·         The physical and visual clutter that the parked bikes create when multiple numbers of them are left parked in a single location;

 

·         The requirement and assurance from "Bike Share" Operators that they comply with the laws relevant to consumer protection, transport, road safety and any Public Liability Claims that may arise from the "Bike Share" operations;

 

·         The requirement to share usage data with local Councils to help both the operators and Local Councils plan and make decisions on transport, public domain, cycling infrastructure and urban planning outcomes;

 

·         The establishment of agreed guidelines/agreements for which "Bike Share" companies are to agree or operate within;

 

·         Enforcement issues associated with significant clutter and non-compliance with Council expectations; and

 

·         The establishment of fees and charges.

 

The matter is of equal concern to many metropolitan councils. SSROC took intial action and now Transport for NSW has launched a formal consultation process with local councils in relation to management of bike share schemes. NSROC is participating in this process and the intention is to develop appropriate guidelines in consultation with the operators and other stakeholders. The Draft Bike Share Guidelines will likely consist of:-

 

·    Ongoing Collaboration;

·    Expectations on operators which set timeframes – urgent and less urgent responses;

·    Operators to inform users of road rules and expectations on them;

·    Proactive monitoring of bike locations to avoid build up and maintain even distribution;

·    Regular data sharing;

·    All bikes to have 24/7 reporting number;

·    Sufficient resourcing to manage telephone hotline and response;

·    Consideration of hot spot parking areas in designated areas;

·    Deployment to avoid conflict with pedestrian amenity;

·    Education of riders; and

·    Access to locking mechanisms for council rangers if required.

 

In the interim, the following internal management actions are being undertaken:-

 

·    Referring resident complaints directly to bike share operators in the first instance, as the operators are best placed to respond to issues affecting their operations; and

 

·    Council’s Rangers are available to provide assistance in instances where bikes are left in inappropriate or dangerous places and immediate intervention is necessary, should bike share operators not respond swiftly enough.

 

Conclusion

 

The emergence of Dockless Bike Share schemes is having unintended consequences, and the current regulatory environment provides limited ability to manage the bikes left in public places. As the issue is local government wide it is appropriate to develop a consistent set of guidelines and standards for operators, which Council staff progress through NSROC.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 11 December 2017

Community Wellbeing Survey 2017

 

 

Subject:          Community Wellbeing Survey 2017    

Record No:    SU5300 - 72490/17

Division:         Human Services Division

Author(s):      Carol Sinclair 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

In July 2014 Council agreed to develop a Community Wellbeing Survey to assist in the collection of subjective data regarding the overall ‘health’ of Lane Cove as an adjunct to Council’s more objective form of data collection through the Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework. The survey provides a way of measuring and understanding the many factors and complexities involved in determining the wellbeing of the community, helps Council to understand the current social issues and trends in Lane Cove and enables these issues and trends to be tracked over time as the survey is repeated every two years.

 

Background

 

The first Wellbeing Survey was conducted in June 2015. It consisted of 33 general questions and 10 demographic questions that covered many areas, including housing, connections with other people, neighbourliness, relationship and contribution to Council, trust, physical and emotional wellness, general outlook, housing education, training and employment opportunities, social networks and opportunities for recreational and social activities. 

 

The information obtained in the Community Wellbeing Survey can be used across all divisions of Council to highlight issues of concern and identify areas for further work. For example, it can inform directions for traffic and road safety, projects for sustainability, cultural and community projects, consultation and communication styles and allocation of asset funding.

 

Discussion.

 

The same survey used in 2015 was used to conduct the survey in June 2017. It was administered by mail, with a printed questionnaire and reply paid envelopes sent to 3,000 randomly selected residential addresses, including both owner/occupiers and renters. Responses were received from 519 people. 

 

The analysis of the data is now available (AT-2) and Council is able to make comparisons between the 2015 and 2017 survey results (AT-1).

 

The report on the data provides an overview of the distribution of responses to each question and includes a bivariate analysis of associations between some responses and key demographic data. Differences in question responses between groups have been reported when they reach a significance of p ≤ 0.05 on the two-tail Pearson Chi-squared test of association and when there is a magnitude of difference between categories or between a category and the national average of 5% or more.

 

In 2017 renters were better included in the administration of the survey.  This has provided an indication of factors important to this group and highlights the difference between them and homeowners in their priorities; for example respondents who are renting are less likely to strongly agree that they have a supportive network of family (13.2%) compared to those who have a mortgage (32.2%) and those who own their home outright (43.8%), and respondents who are renting (45.3%) are more likely than those who have a mortgage (19.0%) or own their home outright (7.4%) to disagree or strongly disagree  with the statement that they are able to afford a reasonable standard of housing in their area.

Some general comparisons are listed below:

 

CSP Objective: Our Society

 

There has been an increase in the proportion of respondents who think that their quality of life has been improving – 25% compared to 22.6% in 2015.

 

CSP Objective: Our built environment

 

There has been a large decrease in the proportion of respondents who agree that they expect to be able to stay in Lane Cove when they move – 48.7% compared to 57.9% in 2015.

 

CSP Objective: Our natural environment

 

There has been an increase in the proportion of respondents who rate the waterways of Lane Cove as very important – 61.7% compared to 56.5% in 2015.

 

The Community Wellbeing Index (score) is based on respondents’ level of agreement with 15 statements measuring wellbeing over different domains. The rating for each question in the wellbeing index was allocated a points value in order to determine a total wellbeing score out of a maximum of 75 possible points. A higher score reflects a higher average level of wellbeing for respondents. The scores have been converted to provide a score out of 100.  In 2015 the Community Wellbeing Index was 76.2.  In 2017 it was 75.

 

Although the score appears to have gone down, given the relative sample sizes of the two sets of survey responses, the difference is too small to be confident that the overall level of wellbeing in the community has really fallen. Tracking the trends in Community Wellbeing will become more useful over a longer period of time as small fluctuations between the two year periods will be absorbed into an overall trend.

 

Conclusion

 

Although the Community Wellbeing Index has gone down slightly it is not statistically significant given the relatively small sample of respondents.  When taking into account the stress of factors such as the threat of amalgamations, the increase in the number and size of large residential flat developments, the pressures of increased traffic and large projects such as the Rosenthal Project and the St Leonards development the overall wellbeing and sentiment in the community appears relatively good and stable. 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Gornall

Executive Manager - Human Services

Human Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Community Wellbeing Survey-Comparison between 2015 and 2017

5 Pages

 

AT‑2View

Community Wellbeing Survey Report-2017

55 Pages

Available Electronically