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Agenda

Ordinary Council Meeting

18 July 2016

The meeting commences at 6.30pm. If members of the public are

not interested in any business recommended to be considered in

Closed Session or there is no such business, Council will ordinarily

  commence consideration of all other business at 7pm.

 

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Notice of Meeting

 

Dear Councillors

 

Notice is given of the Ordinary Council Meeting, to be held in the Council Chambers, 48 Longueville Rd, Lane Cove  on Monday 18 July 2016 commencing at 6:30pm. The business to be transacted at the meeting is included in this business paper.

 

Craig - GMYours faithfully

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

 

Council Meeting Procedures

 

The Council meeting is chaired by the Mayor, Councillor Deborah Hutchens. Councillors are entitled to one vote on a matter. If votes are equal, the Chairperson has a second or casting vote. When a majority of Councillors vote in favour of a Motion it becomes a decision of the Council. Minutes of Council and Committee meetings are published on Council’s website www.lanecove.nsw.gov.au by 5pm on the Thursday following the meeting.

 

The Meeting is conducted in accordance with Council's Code of Meeting Practice. The order of business is listed in the Agenda on the next page. That order will be followed unless Council resolves to modify the order at the meeting. This may occur for example where the members of the public in attendance are interested in specific items on the agenda.

 

Members of the public may address the Council Meeting on any issue for a maximum of 3 minutes during the public forum which is held at the beginning of the meeting. All persons addressing the Meeting must speak to the Chair. Speakers and Councillors will not enter into general debate or ask questions.

 

If you do not understand any part of the information given above; require assistance to participate in the meeting due to a disability; or wish to obtain information in relation to Council, please contact Council’s Manager Governance on 99113525.

 

Please note meetings held in the Council Chambers are recorded on tape for the purposes of verifying the accuracy of minutes and the tapes are not disclosed to any third party under the Government Information (Public Access)  Act 2009, except as allowed under section 18(1) or section 19(1) of the PPIP Act, or where Council is compelled to do so by court order, warrant or subpoena or by any other legislation.

 

 

 


Ordinary Council 18 July 2016

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

APOLOGIES

 

OPENING OF MEETING WITH PRAYER

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT TO COUNTRY

 

NOTICE OF WEBCASTING OF MEETING

 

MATTERS RECOMMENDED BY THE GENERAL MANAGER TO BE CONSIDERED IN CLOSED COMMITTEE

 

Confidential Items

 

1.       Leasing of Retail Space - Ground Floor 1-5 Little Street, Lane Cove

It is recommended that the Council close so much of the meeting to the public as provided for under Section 10A(2) (c) of the Local Government Act, 1993, on the grounds that the report contains information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business; it further being considered that discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to public interest by reason of the foregoing. 

 

public forum

 

Members of the public may address the Council Meeting on any issue for 3 minutes.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

 

2.      ORDINARY COUNCIL MEETING - 20 JUNE 2016

 

Orders Of The Day

 

Officer Reports for Determination

 

3.       End of Term Report - 2012 to 2016

 

4.       Bridge Street/Penrose Street 'No Stopping' Zone

 

5.       DCP - Child Care, Parking & Hospitals- Post Exhbiition

 

6.       Seniors Parking Permit - Increased Age Eligibility

 

7.       Seniors Safety Program

 

8.       New Year's Eve 2016 Road Closure - Greenwich Pennisular

 

Officer Reports for Information

 

9.       25th Anniversary of Lane Cove's Cameraygal Festival

 

10.     Council Snapshot  

 

 

 

                      


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 18 July 2016

End of Term Report - 2012 to 2016

 

 

Subject:          End of Term Report - 2012 to 2016    

Record No:    SU3448 - 41016/16

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Kirsty Beram 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Following the introduction the Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework in 2009, NSW council’s are required to present an End of Term Report to the last Council Meeting at the end of each Council term which details the achievements of that Council during the term and outlines how the community is progressing towards achieving the goals outlined in the Community Strategic Plan. It is recommended that this report be received and noted.

 

Background

 

In 2009 the NSW Government introduced Integrated Planning and Reporting (IP&R) reforms within the Local Government Act (the Act).  These reforms have made it compulsory, among other things, for councils to adopt long term Community Strategic Plans (CSPs) on behalf of their community.  The plans are meant to express the entirety of their community’s aspirations for the future, not just those aspirations that a council may be able to satisfy.  They are required to be genuinely long term with a life span of at least ten years.

 

Throughout 2009-2011 Council undertook extensive community consultation to develop the Community Strategic Plan, Lane Cove 2025, which outlines the vision for the Lane Cove community.  Lane Cove 2025 which was adopted in May 2011, comprises the goals, objectives and strategies for each of the six (6) planning themes:-

·    Our Society;

·    Our Built Environment;

·    Our Natural Environment;

·    Our Culture;

·    Our Economy; and

·    Our Council.

 

Under section 404 of the Act, councils must also develop:-

·    A Delivery Program - which details the principal activities to be undertaken to achieve the objectives established in the Community Strategic Plan, within the resources available under the Resourcing Strategy; and

·    An Operational Plan – which outlines details including the individual projects and activities that will be undertaken each year to achieve the commitments made in the Delivery Program.

 

In 2012, following the ordinary election of councillors, Council prepared a new Delivery Program and Operational Plan which set out the principal activities to be undertaken by Council for the 4 year period from 1 July 2013 to 30 June 2017.  In accordance with the legislation, Council has continued to report quarterly on the progress of these plans to the community. 

 

At the end of each council term, an End of Term report must be prepared that outlines the achievements for that council term implementing the Community Strategic Plan and how the Community is progressing towards achieving the goals outlined in the Community Strategic Plan.

 

Discussion

 

During this term (September 2012- September 2016), Council has delivered an unprecedented number of initiatives within the 10.5 square kilometres of the Council area enhancing the liveability, sustainability and look and feel of Lane Cove for the benefit of our residents, businesses and visitors to the area. 

 

Major highlights include:-

·    The construction of state-of-the-art multipurpose synthetic playing fields at Blackman Park;

·    Completion of the new sports amenities building within the newly constructed Scout Hall and new recreational facilities at Blackman Park;

·    The launch of the highly successful  Love Where You Live Campaign ;

·    Development of an Age-Friendly Strategy;

·    Construction of Hughes Park and completion of a new community centre adjoining the park;

·    Delivery of an extensive diversified events program reflecting the wide range of demographics and interests in the community;

·    Continued provision of the most generous Financial Assistance Grants program across the Northern Sydney region;

·    Undertaking the Stage 2 upgrade of Lane Cove Plaza which improved pedestrian connectivity, dining options for small businesses and the night-time economy in the heart of the Lane Cove Village; 

·    Master planning for the future development of St Leonards South and vital community facilities to support the growing community;

·    Secured additional open space in the Lane Cove north area to meet recreational needs in this precinct;

·    Continuing to record the highest Library borrowing rate per capita in NSW;

·    Progressed planning for the redevelopment of Rosenthal Avenue Car Park site with agreements entered into with retailers and tenders invited for design and construction;

·    Completed the upgrade of Lane Cove Aquatic and Leisure Centre including a new entry to improve access, viewing terrace and cafe, new activity rooms and a doubling of the size of the gym; and

·    Delivery of the Little Street Car Park Redevelopment which has seen the previous car park replaced with a new 200 space underground public car park, as well as the addition of new community and retail space at the site.

 

A video has been developed highlighting the major achievements during the Council Term and this can be viewed at Council’s website www.lanecove.nsw.gov.au.

 

In addition to the video, an End of Term report has been prepared and is shown attached as AT-1. The report highlights the major achievements during the Council Term categorised under the planning themes of Lane Cove 2025, provides data on the key performance indicators listed in the Community Strategic Plan, and discusses the Community’s performance in achieving the goals listed in Lane Cove 2025. A copy of the report will be published on Council’s Website and displayed at the Council Civic Centre and the Lane Cove and Greenwich Libraries.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the End of Term Report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

End of Term Report 2012 - 2016

24 Pages

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 18 July 2016

Bridge Street/Penrose Street 'No Stopping' Zone

 

 

Subject:          Bridge Street/Penrose Street 'No Stopping' Zone    

Record No:    SU1326 - 42186/16

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Sashika Young 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report outlines the current and proposed parking arrangements at the Penrose Street / Bridge Street intersection between the frontage of 11 Penrose Street and 67 Bridge Street and recommends that a ‘No Stopping’ restriction be implemented as a trial for a period of three (3) months.

 

Background

 

The Penrose / Bridge Street intersection of Lane Cove is the subject of frequent complaints from drivers and residents in relation to road safety and parking issues.  Prior to late 2013, the bend at the Penrose / Bridge Street intersection comprised of unrestricted parking. However, representations were made by residents regarding restricted visibility when exiting driveways and hindered access for waste collection vehicles due to parked vehicles.  In addition to residents, users of Penrose Street and Bridge Street have stated that eastbound vehicles along Penrose Street unexpectedly encounter parked vehicles around the bend, which is a potential safety hazard.

 

In response to the above concerns, the matter was referred to the Lane Cove Traffic Committee on several occasions (between 2013 and 2016) with a recommendation to install a full time or partial (on waste collection days) ‘No Stopping’ zone at the bend of the Penrose/Bridge Street intersection.  Whilst approved by the Traffic Committee, the recommendations to install a full time ‘No Stopping’ zone were not supported by Council due to strong objections from affected residents.

 

A partial ‘No Stopping’ restriction (‘No Stopping; Wednesday; 6am-1pm) is currently in place between 1A and 11 Penrose Street to address concerns of waste collection.  This restriction was approved by the July 2014 Traffic Committee. However, Council continued to receive complaints from users of Penrose Street and the lower section of Bridge Street regarding eastbound vehicles being unaware of parked vehicles around the bend.  To address concerns of road safety, the March 2015 Traffic Committee recommended that Council undertake a Road Safety Audit (RSA) by an independent RMS qualified Road Safety Auditor.

 

Discussion

 

Council engaged Complete Urban Pty Ltd, an independent RMS qualified Road Safety Auditor, to undertake a Road Safety Audit (RSA) of the Penrose / Bridge Street corridor between Burns Bay Road and Fox Street.  The RSA noted that the right turn movement into Bridge Street (south) have the potential to block eastbound traffic movements on Penrose Street with right turning vehicles blocking the centre lane and a parked vehicle blocking the kerbside lane.  This has the potential to result in rear end or side swiping crashes.

 

The location of the intersection on the outside of the bend contributes to the issue, with parked vehicles potentially blocking the kerbside lane not fully visible to approaching vehicles until they are at the bend.

 

The RSA recommended that Council consider the implementation of a full-time ‘No Stopping’ restriction on the northern side of Penrose/Bridge Street intersection to ensure that the kerbside lane remains unobstructed for eastbound vehicles should a right turning vehicle be blocking the centre lane. The priority risk rating for this particular item was rated as ‘High’.

 

The recommendation was accepted and was referred to the May 2016 Traffic Committee for approval. Although the Committee was notified of the strong objections from residents due to the loss of parking, the Committee prioritised road safety over parking convenience.

 

Given the lack of support from residents (following resident notifications), Council at its meeting on 20 June 2016, resolved that the matter be referred to a Councillor workshop.  The workshop was held on Monday, 11 July 2016, with a consultant from Complete Urban Pty Ltd outlining the findings of the safety audit. Discussion at the workshop included exploring the option of Council installing a ‘No Stopping’ restriction between 11 Penrose and 67 Bridge Street for a trial period of three (3) months.

 

Community Consultation

 

Affected residents were notified of the proposal to install ‘No Stopping’ between 11 Penrose Street and 67 Bridge Street. No further consultation is proposed at this stage.

 

Conclusion

 

Considering the road safety concerns identified in the RSA undertaken by Complete Urban Pty Ltd, it is recommended that Council implement a ‘No Stopping’ restriction between 11 Penrose and 67 Bridge Street as a trial for a period of three (3) months and continue to monitor the changes and consider all feedback received during this period to assess the effectiveness of the measures. Following the three (3) month trial period, the matter will be referred to a subsequent Councillor workshop to discuss the outcome of the trial period.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:-

1.   Council implement a ‘No Stopping’ restriction between 11 Penrose and 67 Bridge Street for a trial period of three (3) months; and

2.   Following this three (3) month trial period, the matter be referred to a Councillor workshop to discuss the outcome of the trial period.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Patterson

Executive Manager – Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 18 July 2016

DCP - Child Care, Parking & Hospitals- Post Exhbiition

 

 

Subject:          DCP - Child Care, Parking & Hospitals- Post Exhbiition    

Record No:    SU6120 - 36017/16

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):      Christopher Pelcz; Terry Tredrea 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

A series of housekeeping draft amendments to Development Control Plan 2010 were exhibited relating to the number of child care centre places, parking facilities, rates and provisions for child care centres, and hospital scale and location.

 

Council is requested to consider and determine these draft amendments. However, the control of the location of hospitals in the R2 Zone is proposed to be based on a merit assessment of impacts.

 

 The recommendations are summarised in the Conclusion of this report.

 

Background

 

It was proposed at the 7 December 2015 Council meeting to consider amendments to the DCP to respond to issues that have arisen during the assessment of development applications. In addition, a Review of Part R of the DCP was undertaken in September 2014, and as a result minor amendments are recommended herein. These comprise:

 

·         Restrictions to the size of child care centers in residential zones to a maximum of 60 places;

·         Changes to car parking controls for child care centre and residential uses including to accord with SEPP 65 near transit oriented development.

 

Council resolved that a Draft DCP be exhibited, and that a further report be submitted to Council regarding options for controls relating to hospitals in the R2 Zone.

 

It was resolved at the 15 February 2016 Council meeting to make an additional DCP amendment, setting a maximum of 40 beds and minimum separation distance of 800 metres for hospitals in the R2 zone.

 

Discussion

 

The exhibition of the DCP amendments was undertaken from 24 February to 5 April 2016. A total of 4 submissions were received. An overview of each amendment and relevant issues is provided below:-

 

Child Care Centres

 

The amendment was drafted due to a significant increase in development applications for 100+ place child care centres. Council’s concern is related to the scale of these developments, and the localised impacts these developments could have. In response, a review of controls imposed by other councils was undertaken which showed precedents for imposing a cap under the DCP. It was recommended to Council to adopt the Hornsby Council principle of the controlling scale of centres in residential areas. One difference however is that 60 places be permissible regardless of heritage factors.


 

Submissions

Two submissions were received, one from an individual and one from the Lane Cove North Residents Association (LCNRA). The individual submission opposed the proposal which limited the ability to meet the demand for more childcare places, although it was sympathetic to the impact on traffic and parking and suggested imposing requirements for off street parking for larger facilities. The LCNRA supported the implementation of the Hornsby model as well as the suggestion to locate ‘super centres’ in non-residential zones especially if they operate for extended hours, although they were disappointed that the heritage factors would not be considered.

 

Comment

Community concern expressed at previous Council meetings supports the LCNRA view, that to protect residential amenity, size of centres should be restricted. There may however, be isolated locations where traffic and noise impacts are minimal and may be subject to detailed merit-based assessment.

 

Recommendation

That the maximum number of places at any one child centre in a residential zone be limited to 60.

 

Car Parking

 

As explained in the report to Council on 7 December, Part R of the DCP - Traffic, Transport & Parking was reviewed in September 2014 and following utilisation of the new controls a number of minor amendments are proposed. Subsequent issues have arisen during development assessment of car parking proposals for child care centres and residential uses. For example, Council’s controls do not entirely accord with SEPP 65 near transit oriented development.

In response, the amendment is drafted to update Part R: Traffic, Transport and Parking to:-

 

a.   accord with SEPP 65 parking rates for transit oriented developments;

b.   Require onsite removalist truck spaces for developments with greater than 100 units – to ensure trucks do not block the street;

c.   specify requirements for car wash bays for developments with greater than 20 units; and

d.   remove distinctions between part-time and full-time employees in relation to child care centre parking, to refer only to “1 space per 2 employees “.

 

Submissions

One (1) submission was received from the Lane Cove North Residents Association. The submission was generally in support, although it was stated that the association has always held a firm view that the existing parking rates for residential flat buildings could not be supported as they did not meet the demand of those that would be living there.

 

Comment

Under the legislation, if there is an inconsistency between SEPP 65 and Council’s controls, SEPP 65 prevails.   Therefore, to avoid inconsistency, Council’s rates should be amended to better align with the mandatory parking provisions under State Environmental Planning Policy 65 near transit oriented development (St Leonards Railway station). Council’s existing parking rates remain unaltered for the rest of the Local Government Area.

 

Recommendation

Amend Part R of Council’s DCP to accord with SEPP 65 requirements as well as other exhibited controls, b, c and d.

 

 


 

Hospitals in the R2 Low Density Residential Zone

 

The amendment was drafted due to concerns relating to the scale of hospital developments within the R2 zone, in particular the localised impacts these developments have and the need to balance this against the service they provide to the community.

 

Submissions

Four submissions were received, half of the submissions were for the proposal whilst half were against it.

 

The Longueville Private Hospital’s submission against the proposal provided a number of reasons why the proposal should not go ahead. Firstly it pointed out that hospitals are a permitted use in a R2 Zone. Furthermore, hospitals provide a service to the community and there is value to having this within the local community especially due to the potential increase in demand due to the ageing population of the area. In addition it creates employment opportunities within the local area as well as opportunities for volunteer work. It was stated that the proposal undermines the objectives of the NSW E&PA Act in regard to encouraging orderly and economic use and development of land. It was also suggested that other existing planning controls are already in effect that would better mitigate the impacts that this proposal is based upon rather than a blanket approach.

 

A submission was received from the Independent Private Hospitals of Australia which similarly addressed the concerns of the hospital against the DCP amendment.

 

Council staff met with both objectors in early May.  Discussions centred around the fact that population is ageing. It is predicable that the need for hospital beds will increase proportionately over time. This applies to both public and private hospitals. Private hospitals are generally located in low density zones e.g. in Roseville, Castlecrag, Kirribilli and other residential suburbs around Sydney. This provides a quieter, calmer atmosphere with less noise compared with a major hospital. It also makes it easier for relatives and friends to make daily or frequent visits.

 

There were two submissions in support of the proposal. The Lane Cove North Residents’ Association provided their support whilst an individual raised a number of concerns about an existing hospital in the area which could be utilised in support of this proposal. In their case the hospital was adjoining an R2 zoning although the impact to the amenity of the residents could be deemed to be similar. The main concerns focused around likely increased traffic and demand on parking from staff and visitors. Furthermore, site access especially in regards to deliveries and large vehicles can be limited. In addition the timings of these vehicle movements can have an adverse impact on the amenity of the residential area.

 

Comment

The number of beds of a hospital provides a ready indication of likely impact of traffic, parking, built scale and visual character, and the 40-bed limit is contained in the licence for the Longueville Private Hospital. It is reasonable that the hospital be contained to current bed levels.

 

A distance limitation of 800m, however, may lead to inconsistencies with the Local Environmental Plan, which permits the land use within the R2 zone. While a DCP cannot constrain the permissibility of a legal land use, it can require these issues to be addressed in a merit-based assessment.

 

Recommendation

A 40-bed limit on the number of beds for a hospital development in the R2 Zone, and not limit such hospital developments to a minimum separation of 800 lineal metres.


 

Conclusion

 

Child Care- to protect residential amenity, the size of child care centres should be restricted. There may however, be locations where traffic and noise impacts are minimal and may be subject to merit assessment. It is recommended therefore that the maximum number of places at any one child centre in a residential zone be limited to 60.

 

Car Parking - issues have arisen during development assessment of proposals for child care centres and residential uses. For example, Council’s controls do not entirely accord with SEPP 65 near transit oriented development. A range of amendments to Council’s DCP Part R are therefore recommended.

 

Hospitals - with regard to hospitals in R2 zones, it is recommended that Council support either a 40-bed limit, but not the DCP proposal for an 800m set distance to another such use, as this would be contrary to the land uses permissibility in the LEP throughout the R2 Zone.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:-

1.   The Development Control Plan 2010 be finalised to incorporate amendments as follows:-

(i)      To update Part I – Child Care Centres to limit the maximum number of places at any one child centre in a residential zone to 60;

(ii)      To update Part R – Traffic, Transport & Parking to:-

a.   Accord with SEPP 65 parking rates for transit-oriented developments;

b.   Remove distinctions between part-time and full-time employees in relation to child care centre parking, to refer only to “1 space per 2 employees “;

c.   Require onsite removalist truck spaces for developments with greater than 100 units;

d.   Specify requirements for car wash bays for residential developments with greater than 20 units; and

(iii)     To include in the DCP Part B – General Controls:

a.   A 40-bed limit on the number of beds for a hospital development in the R2 Zone.

2.    Council advertise the adoption of DCP Amendments in a local newspaper as soon as practical.

 

 

 

 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 18 July 2016

Seniors Parking Permit - Increased Age Eligibility

 

 

Subject:          Seniors Parking Permit - Increased Age Eligibility    

Record No:    SU5300 - 41413/16

Division:         Human Services Division

Author(s):      Carol Sinclair 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council provides parking spaces for eligible seniors throughout the Lane Cove village.  At present residents must be 60 years or older in order to be eligible for the Seniors Parking Permit.  However, with increasing life expectancy older people are staying fitter and more mobile for longer and therefore this report recommends that the eligibility age be increased from 60 to 67 years incrementally over the next seven (7) years.

 

Discussion

 

In keeping with the demographic trends a greater number of older people are driving in Lane Cove.  It is important for older people to keep driving and to be independent and connected with their community. The Seniors Parking Permit Program supports this by providing closer access to shops and utilities (eg banks, shops, Post Office).

 

An action arising from the Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove Action Plan (Action 1.4.iv, AT-1) was that the age for Seniors Parking be raised to 65 or 70 as respondents felt 60 was too young. During the consultations participants felt that at 60 people are still mobile and do not require special parking spaces. They felt that these spaces should be made available for people who are older and need it more. They noted that if people under 67 need to have parking spaces that are closer to amenities and shops then they have the option of applying for a permit through the Mobility Parking Scheme (MPS) and park in the Accessible car spaces.

 

The Seniors Parking Permit Program is very popular with 620 passes being issued in 2015, 826 being issued in 2015 and to date 519 being issued in 2016.  The passes are renewed every two (2) years.  There are currently 31 Seniors Parking spaces in the following locations:-

 

Six (6) in Rosenthal Avenue Car Park

Seven (7) in Coles Car Park

Eight (8) in Market Square Car Park

Five (5) in Little Street Car Park

Two (2) at the Lane Cove Community Centre

Three (3) at the rear of the Len Wallis Audio

 

Each year approximately 250 parking fines are issued for people parking in a space allocated for Seniors Parking without a permit.

 

The following shows the age distribution of parking permits currently issued.

 

  

<60

61

62

63

64

65

66

67

68-70

71-75

76-80

81-85

86 +

Total

2014

8

9

14

19

15

23

22

26

126

124

81

64

89

620

2015

22

19

37

29

39

32

33

50

147

204

104

64

46

826

2016

19

20

30

31

28

38

34

35

67

114

61

21

21

519

 

The Age-Friendly Advisory Committee discussed the action to increase the age limit at which people are eligible for Seniors Parking Permits and recommended that the age limit be raised to 67 years in alignment with the pension age, and that the age limit increase over time as the pension age rises. 

 

The Commonwealth Government introduced measures in 2009 to increase the pension age to 67 through gradual increases during the period July 2017 to July 2023.  The below table shows how the pension age will increase as follows over the next seven (7) years:

                           

1 July, 2016

65

1 July, 2017

65.5

1 July, 2019

66

1 July, 2021

66.5

1 July, 2023

67

As a result of the staged increases, no existing permit holders in the age range of 60-67 years will lose their permits.

             

Conclusion

 

Older people are more mobile than they have been in previous generations and at 60 most do not need special parking considerations. By raising the age at which people are eligible for a Seniors Parking Permit people who are in the older age groups of 67 plus, would have increased access to seniors parking spaces which will improve their access and ability to access parking necessary for independent and connected lives.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:-

1.   The age of eligibility for Seniors Parking be raised from 60 to 67 over the next 7 years and be increased in alignment with future increases in Pension Age thereafter;

2.   The first change to be on 1 January 2017 when the age for eligibility for a Senior Parking permit will be raised to 65 years, followed by increases as aligned to the dates as follows: 

1 July, 2016

65

1 July, 2017

65.5

1 July, 2019

66

1 July, 2021

66.5

1 July, 2023

67

3.   The changes not be retrospective and existing permit holders not be affected by these changes; and

4.   The new age of eligibility for parking permits be widely promoted.

 

 

 

 

Jane Gornall

Executive Manager - Human Services

Human Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Excerpt from Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove Action Plan:   2014 – 2017

1 Page

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 18 July 2016

Seniors Safety Program

 

 

Subject:          Seniors Safety Program    

Record No:    SU5300 - 41245/16

Division:         Human Services Division

Author(s):      Carol Sinclair 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Over the past several years Council has conducted a number of consultations to determine the needs of the community in order to develop and implement targeted strategies and programs to fulfill the identified needs and increase community wellbeing.

 

Council’s is preparing to introduce a new program, Safety for Seniors, to help older people feel and be safer and more connected in their communities.  It will be a collaborative program with Lane Cove and North Side Community Services and is based on a similar program run by Rockingham Council in WA, also a member of the World Health Organisation Global Network of Age-friendly Cities and Communities. 

 

Discussion

 

Council will work in partnership with Lane Cove and North Side Community Services to implement this program.  The program is designed for people who live alone or who feel socially isolated from the community. 

 

The program relates to a number of Council documents and plans including:-

 

·         The Community Wellbeing Survey (August 2015) which demonstrates that while people feel quite safe in Lane Cove, particularly in the day time, people over 70 years feel less safe compared with the average scores of all other respondents (available electronically at AT-1)

 

·         The Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove Action Plan: 2014-2017 (available electronically at AT-2) which suggests:

 

o   Domain 1 - Strategy 8 (to help create an outdoor environment where older people can get out and about with ease and safety) to implement a house numbering campaign - Action 1.8.ii.

o   Domain 4 - Strategy One (to help assist older people to feel they are respected and valued as members of the community and are socially included rather than excluded or isolated) to develop and implement an outreach program to locate and connect isolated residents - Action 4.1.v.

o   Domain 5 - Strategy One (to enable older people to participate in social, recreation and leisure activities), Action 5.1.viii - to encourage programs for increased volunteering for home visiting.

 

·         The Delivery Program and Operational Plan 2016 - 2017 which identifies community safety as part of Council’s goal for an inclusive, interconnected and active community.  Objectives related to increasing the feelings of personal safety and perceptions of Lane Cove as a safe place to live and enjoy community life includes strategies and actions such as promoting the ‘Next of Kin Register’ held by the NSW Police and fostering crime prevention through partnering with the police.

 

·         A recent study in Lane Cove which found that people say they feel safer when they are connected to their neighbours (AT-3)

 

There are two (2) components to the Safety for Seniors Program:-

 

1.    The Community Safety Program is aimed at supporting the more vulnerable and isolated residents of Lane Cove. It offers participants the opportunity to connect with a volunteer by phone at least once a month for a chat, a free Crime Prevention through Environmental Design checklist, regular updates about crime prevention ideas and things to do, a copy of the seniors newsletter the Lane Cove Connection, a copy of the brochure ‘An invitation to older residents’, encouragement to join the Next of Kin program with the NSW Police Force and invitations to talks and safety programs.

 

2.    The Security Improvement Scheme focuses on the installation of low cost measures to increase the safety of older people. This can include items such as the installation of a key lock box so that people who are given the code can have access to the premises in an emergency, fluorescent house numbers to help locate the house at night in case of emergency and a door viewer so the resident can see who is at the front door.  This Scheme will be for residents who are on a pension or who hold a Health Care Card.

 

3.    It is proposed that the Security Improvement Scheme grants program run for two months each year, in April and November, and applicants will receive one off assistance to the value of $100, based on priority of need. The program will be limited to a maximum of $2,000 p.a. to be funded from the Aged and Disability budget. To facilitate this a one off advertisement will be place indicating council’s intention to provide the financial assistance, individual participants will not be named.

 

It is expected that the program will grow and develop over time as new and creative ways of connecting isolated members of the community and improving safety around the home and in our community are identified.  The program will be promoted on Council and Lane Cove and North Side Community Services websites and in various printed materials.

 

Conclusion

Identifying and implementing strategies to help older people feel safer and more connected in their community will help improve their wellbeing which can have a significant and positive effect on

their lives, contributing to the safety and well-being of all members of the community.


 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:-

1.   The report be received and noted; and

2.   Council give Public Notice of the proposed Financial Assistance to be provided under the Security Improvement Scheme grants program, and subject to no objections being received, grant the funds to the eligible applicants.

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Gornall

Executive Manager - Human Services

Human Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Community Wellbeing Survey Lane Cove 2015

60 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑2View

Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove Action Plan: 2014-2017

66 Pages

Available Electronically

AT‑3View

Final Report - Community Conversations Lane Cove - Meeting House review - March 2016

15 Pages

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 18 July 2016

New Year's Eve 2016 Road Closure - Greenwich Pennisular

 

 

Subject:          New Year's Eve 2016 Road Closure - Greenwich Pennisular    

Record No:    SU1326 - 42557/16

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Sashika Young 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report outlines the proposed traffic management arrangements for the 2016 New Year’s Eve road closures at the Greenwich Peninsular and recommends Council publicise the changes as soon as possible to allow the community to have regard to the changes.

 

Background

 

Each year New Year’s Eve celebrations approximately 200 people gather at Manns Point Park, Greenwich, to view the fireworks at Sydney Harbour Bridge.  The event requires traffic, parking and pedestrian management due to its popularity, which includes closure of the area to vehicular traffic. Council has also implemented Alcohol Free zones in the precinct to assist in controlling crowd behaviour.

 

Discussion

 

NSW Police have indicated Greenwich Road is proposed to be closed from 5:30pm on Saturday 31st December 2016 to 2am on Sunday 1st January 2017. The closures are proposed to be on Greenwich Road at Bay Street and Chisholm Street at Edwin Street, refer to the Traffic Control Plan at AT-1.  As the Greenwich Peninsular is not a thoroughfare, the road closures will primarily impact those residents who still require access to their properties during the road closure hours.

 

Specifically the closure will be as follows:-

·    5:30pm-6pm – Residents and their visitors will be allowed to enter the road closures (with appropriate proof of address);

·    6pm onwards – no access will be allowed into the road closures for anyone, including residents, with the exception of emergency services;

·    Vehicles will be allowed to exit the road closures after 1am due to safety concerns regarding the mix of vehicles and pedestrians; and

·    Vehicles will be allowed to enter the road closures after 2am.

 

For many years local residents and their guests were allowed to pass through the road block, however, in recent years this has not been consistently applied. Clarification was sought from NSW Police on the issue who indicated that they were standardising their approach to closures on New Year’s Eve, and residents will no longer be given exemptions.

 

Given the potential impact of the road closures on Greenwich residents, discussions were held with Senior NSW Police representatives.  Council was advised that its Operational Shutdown includes the Greenwich peninsular area and it is imperative that all vehicular access (including that of residents) is restricted within the designated road closure to ensure appropriate pedestrian safety.  Therefore, the above traffic management arrangements are necessary during the 2016 New Year’s Eve celebrations.


 

Community Awareness

 

All affected residents will be informed in writing via a letterbox drop at least two (2) months prior to the road closures, with a subsequent reminder notice issued two (2) weeks prior to the event.  Furthermore, Variable Message Signs (VMS) advising of the road closure will be in place at the Greenwich Peninsular least two (2) weeks prior to the event.  The traffic management arrangements will also be advertised on Council’s website.

 

Conclusion

 

Considering the advice from NSW Police, Council is required to implement the traffic management arrangements for the closure of Greenwich Road from 5:30pm on Saturday 31st December 2016 to 2am on Sunday 1st January 2017.  Advance notice to residents will allow time for residents to incorporate the changes into their planning.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:-

1.     Council note the proposed New Year’s Eve road closures in Greenwich; and

2.     Promote community awareness of the closures as outlined in the report.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Patterson

Executive Manager – Open Space and Urban Services

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Traffic Control Plan - 2016 NYE Road Closure

1 Page

 

 

  


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 18 July 2016

25th Anniversary of Lane Cove's Cameraygal Festival

 

 

Subject:          25th Anniversary of Lane Cove's Cameraygal Festival    

Record No:    SU5902 - 39946/16

Division:         Human Services Division

Author(s):      Jane Gornall 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Lane Cove’s Cameraygal Festival is celebrating its 25th Anniversary this year.  To acknowledge the past 25 years of the Festival, a range of community and Council-run events supporting this year’s theme ‘Celebrate Lane Cove’ will be run across nine exciting weeks from August to October 2016.

 

Background

 

Lane Cove’s Cameraygal Festival has been running for 25 years.  The Festival continues to profile the activities run by Lane Cove’s community groups from August to October with around 30 community groups participating each year.  This year’s Festival runs from Friday, 12 August to Sunday, 9 October during which time the community are encouraged to participate in a wide-range of events.

 

Discussion

 

This year’s Festival theme ‘Celebrate Lane Cove’ has been chosen to reflect the 25th anniversary celebrations.  This theme celebrates all that Lane Cove has to offer and the events included in this year’s Festival embrace Lane Cove’s dynamic history, landscape, lifestyle and community.   More than 60 events make up the program which will be distributed to residents via a letterbox drop. An electronic version of the program hosted on Council’s website will be heavily promoted along with additional marketing to help promote the 25th year including bus shelter advertising, banners, street flags and signature events.

 

Conclusion

 

2016 will mark the culmination of 25 years of community activities as part of the annual Cameraygal Festival.  This August Council and the community will celebrate the 25th Lane Cove Cameraygal Festival.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Gornall

Executive Manager - Human Services

Human Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

LC Cameraygal Program A4 2 Pages

16 Pages

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 18 July 2016

Council Snapshot

 

 

Subject:          Council Snapshot    

Record No:    SU220 - 37265/16

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):      Craig Wrightson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Attached for the information of Councillors is a review of Council’s recent activities, entitled Council Snapshot.  This report provides a summary of the operations of each Division.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1View

Monthly Snapshot

49 Pages