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Agenda

Ordinary Council Meeting

16 November 2015

The meeting commences at 6.30pm. If members of the public are

not interested in any business recommended to be considered in

Closed Session or there is no such business, Council will ordinarily

  commence consideration of all other business at 7pm.

 


 

Notice of Meeting

 

Dear Councillors

 

Notice is given of the Ordinary Council Meeting, to be held in the Council Chambers, 48 Longueville Road Lane Cove on Monday 16 November 2015 commencing at 7:00pm. The business to be transacted at the meeting is included in this business paper.

 

Yours faithfully

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

 

Council Meeting Procedures

 

The Council meeting is chaired by the Mayor, Councillor Deborah Hutchens. Councillors are entitled to one vote on a matter. If votes are equal, the Chairperson has a second or casting vote. When a majority of Councillors vote in favour of a Motion it becomes a decision of the Council. Minutes of Council and Committee meetings are published on Council’s website www.lanecove.nsw.gov.au by 5pm on the Thursday following the meeting.

 

The Meeting is conducted in accordance with Council's Code of Meeting Practice. The order of business is listed in the Agenda on the next page. That order will be followed unless Council resolves to modify the order at the meeting. This may occur for example where the members of the public in attendance are interested in specific items on the agenda.

 

Members of the public may address the Council Meeting on any issue for a maximum of 3 minutes during the public forum which is held at the beginning of the meeting. All persons addressing the Meeting must speak to the Chair. Speakers and Councillors will not enter into general debate or ask questions.

 

If you do not understand any part of the information given above; require assistance to participate in the meeting due to a disability; or wish to obtain information in relation to Council, please contact Council’s Manager Governance on 99113525.

 

Please note meetings held in the Council Chambers are recorded on tape for the purposes of verifying the accuracy of minutes and the tapes are not disclosed to any third party under the Government Information (Public Access)  Act 2009, except as allowed under section 18(1) or section 19(1) of the PPIP Act, or where Council is compelled to do so by court order, warrant or subpoena or by any other legislation.

 

 

 


Ordinary Council 16 November 2015

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

APOLOGIES

 

OPENING OF MEETING WITH PRAYER

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT TO COUNTRY

 

NOTICE OF WEBCASTING OF MEETING

 

public forum

 

Members of the public may address the Council Meeting on any issue for 3 minutes.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

 

1.      ORDINARY COUNCIL MEETING - 19 OCTOBER 2015

 

Mayoral Minutes

 

2.      Response to IPART Assessment Report on Council Fit for the Future Proposals

 

Orders Of The Day

 

Officer Reports for Determination

 

3.      Presentation of Annual Financial Statements - Year Ended 30 June 2015

 

4.      Planning Institute of Australia - NSW Division Award for Council's Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove

 

5.      1st Quarter Review of the 2015-2016 Budget

 

6.      Sustainability Small Grants Round 11 - Recommended Recipients

 

7.      Aquatic Centre Lift Report

 

8.      Council's Annual Report 2014/15

 

Officer Reports for Information

 

9.      Create Lane Cove: Cultural Plan

 

10.    1st Quarter Review of the 2015-16 Delivery Program and Operational Plan

 

11.    Council Snapshot  

 

 

 

 

         


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 November 2015

Response to IPART Assessment Report on Council Fit for the Future Proposals

 

 

Subject:          Response to IPART Assessment Report on Council Fit for the Future Proposals    

Record No:     SU5558 - 67838/15

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):       Councillor Deborah Hutchens 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Councillors will recall Council was required to provide submissions by 30 June 2015 in response to the ILGRP Report regarding merger proposals.

 

In response to this, Council expended significant time, effort and funds on developing a superior alternative model, a Joint Regional Authority (JRA), in partnership with Hunters Hill and Ryde City Councils to the merger proposal put forward by the ILGRP. However, the NSW State Government in releasing the IPART assessment report has not supported the JRA proposal and has requested councils respond to the Government by 18 November 2015 with up to three (3) merger proposals supported by a maximum of only 50 words.

 

Council is at a watershed moment and must now determine its final position in relation to the option of mergers, contrary to community support, or to continue pressing the cause for either standing alone and/or furthering the JRA concept.

 

Discussion

 

The IPART assessment report was delivered to the State government as required on Friday, 16 October 2015.  After Government gave ‘proper’ consideration to the report it was publicly released on Tuesday 20 October 2015. 

 

The IPART report assessed Lane Cove Council AT-1, as follows:

 

Criteria

Rating

1.   Scale and capacity

x

2.   Financial criteria overall

ü

3.   Sustainability

ü

4.   Infrastructure and service management

ü

5.   Efficiency

ü

Overall Assessment

Not Fit

 

Given that Council meets four (4) of the criteria reflecting Council’s strong financial position for a considerable period and its sustainability into the future, the Not Fit assessment is a very disappointing outcome, although Council should be well-pleased with the four (4) successful financial and sustainability ratings.

 

A detailed listing of all metropolitan council assessments is attached to this report at AT-2.

 

Only seven (7) Metropolitan Councils were found to be fit by meeting the scale and capacity criteria and in total only 52 NSW Councils were found to be fit.

 

In the Metropolitan area, only three (3) Councils failed the financial criteria and two (2) are most noteworthy. One is the largest council in this State (Blacktown), the other a top ten in size (Campbelltown). In fact, 90% of metropolitan councils, and all councils proposed to be merged into the North Shore Mega-council, met the NSW Government’s financial criteria and are therefore financially sustainable.

 

One must ask the question, if bigger is better? Then why have these two (2) significant councils failed the financial criteria.

 

The release of the IPART report on Tuesday, 20 October 2015 was preceded by a webcast briefing by the Premier, the Minister for Local Government and the IPART Chairman. During the webcast the Premier commented on his disappointment that more councils had not submitted merger proposals and Councils now have a ‘one more chance’ opportunity to submit voluntary merger proposals within 30 days.

 

The Premier and Minister for Local Government both emphasised the Stronger Communities Funding package to support voluntary mergers comprising of $10.0 million to meet up front merger costs, $10.0 million for expenditure on local community infrastructure and a bonus of $5.0 million where three (3) or more Councils merge, to fund local community infrastructure. The provisos on this are that all proposals must be submitted by the deadline of 18 November 2015 and all parties to a proposal and the Government must agree.

 

In order for councils to provide a response to the NSW Government’s “consultation”, General Managers have been provided with access to a portal and ‘consultation’ template that allows for feedback on IPART’s assessment of Council’s FFTF submission (noting that DP & C has advised that such feedback will not result in any changes to the IPART report).

 

The template provides for councils to nominate up to 3 preferred merger options, each merger option can include up to seven (7) merger partners.  There is no option in the template for councils to continue to stand alone or to nominate a JRA proposal. Councils may submit supportive commentary on their preferences; however this commentary is limited to a maximum of only 50 words. It should be noted that councils do not have to participate in this final round of “consultation”.

 

It is fair to say that there is widespread concern and dismay from the vast majority of Councils across the State as to the findings of the IPART report. Not the least of these is still the very unclear notion of ‘scale and capacity’, the criteria upon which most councils failed.

 

Having read the report my understanding of ‘scale and capacity’ as applied by IPART is as follows:

IPART accepted that the ILGRP view of ‘scale and capacity’ was correct and all submissions would be measured against the proposed mergers suggested in the ILGRP final report. If the submissions did not provide evidence that showed the Council’s proposal was better it was judged ‘unfit’.

 

For many, many years now Local Government has been pounded about being financially fit and this process started with the TCorp report in 2013 that suggested many councils were financially unfit. Clearly councils have responded positively to that criticism and in all but three (3) cases the IPART assessment report found all Metropolitan Councils met the overall financial criteria.

 

It therefore seems that the Government has rejected that there is any correlation between what one can only call the nebulous notion of scale and capacity and financial performance, a seemingly illogical conclusion.

 

A very interesting outcome of a review of the IPART report is seen from the Ernst & Young (E & Y) Appendix C, where they were commissioned by IPART to provide an overview report of the business cases submitted to IPART by Metropolitan councils.

 

Putting aside its review of the numbers the report contains many qualifications that could support an argument that the IPART assessment methodology was flawed, as is the Government rhetoric about Council performance. The following quotes are just a sample of the qualifications contained in the report.

 

E & Y reviews the preferred merger options made in the ILGRP report and found that:-

 

1.    “In this regard, we note while the ILGRP expressed a preference for a number of mergers, quantitative analysis was not undertaken to test the economic merits of the proposals.” (page 4 E & Y Report)

 

2.    “Having considered the evidence in merger integration costs as summarised in Section 1.4.1 above, we have estimated once-off merger integration costs at the rate of 3.0 times the annualised expenditure saving. The exception to this are the mergers involving Marrickville, Ashfield, Burwood, Canada Bay, Leichardt and Strathfield Councils, Auburn, Holroyd and Parramatta Councils together with parts of the Hills and Ryde Councils, Botany Bay, Sydney, Waverley, Randwick and Woollahra Councils and Hunters Hill, Lane Cove, Mosman, North Sydney, Willoughby and part Ryde. We understand these four merger options were regarded by the NSW Parliamentary Budget Office, based on advice from the Office of Local Government, as being of ‘very high’ complexity in their costing of council mergers. For these four merger options, we have therefore assumed merger integration costs at the rate of 4.0 times the annualised expenditure saving”. (Page 7 E & Y Report)

 

3.    “Whilst theory suggests that economies of scale should exist where fixed costs constitute a large proportion of total cost, this concept is supported, but not always, by empirical findings”. (Page 20 E & Y Report)

 

Additionally, the NSW Upper House Inquiry into Local Government, headed by the Hon Paul Green MLC highlighted significant shortcomings in the Fit for the Future Process.  The Report was released on 29 October 2015 with the following findings:-

·   NSW Government failed to make a case for council amalgamations, relying on ‘unreliable’ information;

·   IPART does not have the skills to assess the overall capacity of Councils;

·   Projected benefits of council amalgamations have been overstated by the amalgamation proposals;

·   Recommended in part that Joint Organisations such as the one proposed by Hunters Hill, Ryde and Lane Cove Councils be available to all councils in NSW; and

·   NSW Government should commit to a policy of no forced amalgamations of local councils, except in circumstances where it can be established that a council is severely financially unsustainable to the point of bankruptcy or unable to maintain an acceptable level of service provision.

 

The statements by the NSW Government in recent months have been a series of half truths designed to pollute the general community’s view on the amalgamation debate. For the record here is the real truth on the matters raised.

 


They say: Local government is losing $1 million a day

 

Truth: In 2013/14 Sydney councils made an overall profit of $30m. In 2014/15 NSW councils made a $220m profit.

 

They say: Victoria and Queensland have half as many councils and by inference work more efficiently

 

Truth: Rates in Victoria and Queensland are at least 20% higher per capita than NSW. In fact, rates have risen faster over the last 7 years in these States, displaying no evidence of higher efficiency.

 

They say: 71% of Sydney councils are ‘Not Fit’

 

Truth: 93% of councils were deemed financially viable by IPART. The NSW Upper House Inquiry recommended that the Government withdraw the statements that 71% of metropolitan councils are unfit. The only criteria most councils failed was scale and capacity. The Upper House found the criteria was flawed and shouldn’t have been included in the assessment criteria.

 

They say: They would consider superior alternatives to their mergers

 

Truth: An Upper House Inquiry commended the Joint Regional Authority proposal put forward by Lane Cove, Hunters Hill and Ryde Councils as an option that should be made available to all Metropolitan councils. The NSW Government has ignored this option saying it adds a fourth layer of government (even though this is an option they have made available to regional councils).

 

Where to from here?

 

The Fit for the Future proposal is graphically illustrated below and projects a 2031 population of 365,400 for the merged entity.

 

 

Council must now consider it future direction(s) by 18 November 2015 i.e. less than 30 days notice and the following table outlines a number of options that Council may wish to consider. These options contain some brief comments and the risks that may be associated with them if followed.

Some basic parameters also include:-

·   In considering the options it is known that upfront merger costs in the Morrison Low report for the mega council option are estimated at $120m;

·   Other possible voluntary merger options would have up front merger costs likely to exceed $50m;

·   Therefore $10m is only 20% of the total that can only be met by slashing staff (which is shackled by employment protections), reducing services, asset sales or borrowings;

·   Special Rate Variations (SRVs) are an option that will probably be blocked by the government;

·   The majority of these upfront merger costs will be incurred in the first two years potentially creating a cash flow problem for any new entity; and

·   There is no known implementation plan for voluntary or forced amalgamations

 

 

OPTION

COMMENT

RISK ANALYSIS

A

Do not submit any proposal as it is not compulsory

·    Comments could be provided to Government as to why a proposal is not being submitted.

 

·    State Government could force amalgamations.

·    Amalgamations forced (AT-3).

·    No opportunity to participate in process.

·    Up front merger costs still have to be funded.

·    May result in legal action.

B

Pursue the JRA model in its present form

·    Not supported by IPART as they conclude that a merger would provide greater benefits.

·    The Upper House Inquiry report contains a recommendation that the JRA should be an option for all NSW councils.

·    Option still not accepted by Government.

C

Pursue an enlarged JRA model by including additional member Councils

·    Would be judged fit but unless benefits can be demonstrated as significantly closer to that of the proposed merger then also not likely to be supported.

 

·    Business case and cost benefit analysis (CBA) would be required as supporting evidence.

·    Insufficient response to create enlarged model.

·    Business case and CBA do provide sufficient evidence State Government still will not support.

·    Business case and CBA do not provide sufficient supporting evidence.

D

Submit a voluntary merger proposal based on an alternate combination

·    All participant Councils must pass resolutions of support and the State Government must agree in order to receive the $20.0+m funding available.

·    No other Council has approached Council with a view to merging.

·    No business case or supporting evidence required.

·    Option to participate in process and have some say or control in creation of new entity.

·    Other Councils could submit a proposal without our agreement.

·    Up front merger costs unquantified but substancial.

·    Lack of implementation plan.

 


Risk Assessment

 

Clearly there may be a financial impact on ratepayers if a merger occurs and rate harmonisation is required.  Therefore despite the Government rhetoric; rates are likely to increase under a mega merger scenario. 

 

To meet the upfront merger costs and manage the concurrent cash flow there may be a need to either cut or reduce services or access borrowings. The following has been extracted from the Ernst & Young report, which was included in the IPART Report:-

 

“Key Risks Identified

 

All of the merger business cases we reviewed identified key risks arising from the merger, particularly around the obvious financial risks such as transitional and implementation costs being more significant than set out in the business cases or that the efficiencies projected are not delivered.

 

Reports prepared by KPMG also identified other financial and non-financial risks such as the risk of the merged entity not being able to achieve financial sustainability over the longer term, strategic risks, risk to service quality and effectiveness, risk to the effectiveness of local representation and risk to effective implementation and management over time.

 

Reports prepared by Morrison Low discussed other key risks identified such as the risk that cultural integration of the different councils could negatively impact morale and the staff turnover rate. This could reduce business performance and prolong the time taken to achieve the projected efficiencies.  Service levels are also at risk to rise across the merged council, standardising on the highest level of those services that being integrated.

 

Meanwhile, should the financial performance of the merged council be less than projected, this could result in the need to reduce services, find further efficiency gains or increase rates to address the operating deficit. In addition, developing a governance model that represents the communities of interest across the proposed merger area could also prove to be challenging”.

(Page 52 E & Y Report)

 

Community Consultation

 

In response to the State Government’s proposed mergers, Council has undertaken extensive consultation via deliberative polls, surveys and public meetings. The key outcomes of the consultations included:-

·    Petition with more than 1000 signatures in support of standing alone or entering into a JRA.

·    Strong community support for a JRA in preference to a merger.

 

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In response to this latest call for mergers by the Government, Council hosted a further meeting on 9 November 2015 and there was almost unanimous support from those in attendance for Council to stand alone and continue to call for the Government to allow the JRA option.

 

Given that these results are consistent with all previous results, Council, as a democratically elected body whose role it is to represent the will of our community should respond accordingly. Our community does not want to merge and any change should be the community’s decision. In this regard, I propose that the issue of amalgamations should be put to the whole community through a poll/referendum, and the decision be binding on Council and the NSW Government.  A referendum would provide a clear mandate on which direction the community wants to take on the issue. The process for a poll is outlined in the Legal Advice included as AT.4. From discussions with the General Manager the earliest the poll/referendum could be held would be in February 2016 so the Christmas and holiday season does not interfere with the process. This is a relatively minor delay for the NSW Government and will allow a democratic process.

 

Conclusion

 

In its extensive consultation with the community a number of core values have been identified by Lane Cove residents which may be lost with a merger of Council, particularly the mega-council proposed by the ILGRP:-

·    Loss of democracy and representation;

·    Diminution of access to councillors and staff;

·    Loss of sense of community; and

·    Concerns about responsiveness and impact on service delivery and provision of infrastructure.

Despite these core values and the strong financial position of Council and its demonstrated sustainability into the future, it appears that the NSW Government is focussed on the notion of scale and capacity (i.e. size) in its proposed reforms of local government.  Communities of interest and loss of local democracy and representation is being totally disregarded.  Council is at a watershed moment and has the option to consider mergers contrary to community support or to continue pressing the cause for either standing alone and/or furthering the JRA concept. Having listened to our community and reviewed the studies and reports, I propose that Council continue to seek to maintain local democracy and our independence through the JRA model.  I also propose that the Government be called upon to defer the current deadline to allow Council to conduct a poll / referendum on the amalgamation issue and both Council and the NSW Government be bound by the decision. 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council:-

1.   Following community consultation and strong community support to remain an independent council that works collaboratively with neighbouring councils on regional issues and joint service delivery, not pursue a merger with any other council;

2.   Reaffirms its opposition to the forced amalgamation of councils;

3.   Reaffirms its detailed independent analysis that the Lane Cove Community is best served in financial, social, and environmental terms by the current Council structure; 

4.   Reaffirms its previously resolved commitment to and participation in a Joint Regional Authority (JRA) model whilst maintaining our independence as a Council;

5.   Write to the Premier, the Minister for Local Government and all State Members of Parliament calling on the NSW Government to defer the deadline for presenting merger options to allow councils to conduct a poll/referendum on the amalgamation issue to best gauge the community’s position on the matter and the outcome be binding on Council and the Government;

6.   Subject to the Government agreeing to be bound by the outcome, Council conduct a poll / referendum in February 2016 on whether or not Lane Cove should merge with another council or councils;

7.   Having previously submitted the JRA model as a superior model for further improvement and given the unanimous multi-partisan endorsement of the JRA model by the NSW Legislative Council Inquiry into Local Government in NSW, respond in the template due on 18 November with words that reflect Council’s position;

8.   Support the "Rally for Local Democracy" at 12noon on 18 November 2015 in Martin Place and continue an information campaign which promotes Council’s position in relation to mergers;

9.   Write to the Premier and the Minister for Local Government seeking urgent clarification of the NSW Government's intentions regarding any forced merger of councils;

10. Endorses the report of the Upper House Committee on Local Government and calls on the State Government to withdraw the statement that ‘Councils are unfit’, as it was based on a flawed methodology and acknowledge recommendations number 16 and 17 in respect of Joint Regional Authorities and finding number 9 relating to projected economic outcomes and benefits being overstated;

11. Write to the Member for Lane Cove, the Hon Anthony Roberts MP seeking his support in respect of the above matters; and

12. Authorise the Mayor and General Manager to instigate whatever legal action is deemed necessary to support the above resolutions at the appropriate time.

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor Deborah Hutchens

Mayor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

IPART Lane Cove Report Card

2 Pages

 

AT‑2 View

IPART Metropolitan Councils Assessments

4 Pages

 

AT‑3 View

Process if NSW Government Proceeds with Mergers

1 Page

 

AT‑4 View

Process for the Conduct of a Council Poll / Referendum

13 Pages

 

 

            


Ordinary Council Meeting 16 November 2015

Presentation of Annual Financial Statements - Year Ended 30 June 2015

 

 

Subject:          Presentation of Annual Financial Statements - Year Ended 30 June 2015    

Record No:     SU772 - 66415/15

Author(s):       Craig Dalli 

 

 

Executive Summary

Following completion of the audit, Council’s Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2015 and the Auditors Report, are presented to Council.  It will be recommended that the reports be received.

Discussion

Section 418 of the Local Government Act 1993, requires that as soon as practicable after a council receives a copy of the auditor's reports:-

a)   it must fix a date for the meeting at which it proposes to present its audited financial reports, together with the auditor's reports, to the public; and

b)   it must give public notice of the date so fixed. 

The audit of the Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2015 has been completed by Council's Auditors – PricewaterhouseCoopers, and a copy of their Audit Report is included with the Financial Statements. 

Council’s Internal Audit Committee have reviewed the statements and resolved:-

 “That the external audit of the 2014/15 Annual Financial Statements be received and noted.”

Notice was given in the North Shore Times on 4 November 2015 of the intention to present the Annual Financial Statements at this meeting.  The Statements have been available for inspection at the Administration Centre since 4 November 2015.  Written submissions were invited and at the time of writing this report, no submissions had been received.  The audited financial statements, together with the auditor's reports, are now formally presented to Council. 

Council's Auditor will be in attendance at the meeting to present the Auditor's Report and to answer any questions. A copy of the Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2015 are attached as AT-1.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council receive the Annual Financial Reports together with the Auditors Report for the Year Ended 30 June 2015.

 

 

 

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

General Purpose Financial Statement for the Year Ended 30 June 2015

97 Pages

Available Electronically

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 November 2015

Planning Institute of Australia - NSW Division Award for Council's Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove

 

 

Subject:          Planning Institute of Australia - NSW Division Award for Council's Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove    

Record No:     SU5300 - 68116/15

Division:         Human Services Division

Author(s):       Jane Gornall 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council will recall that Council adopted its Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove in June 2015. Council staff and the consultant for the project, Sharyn Briggs from Briggs and Mortar subsequently submitted the project into the Planning Institute of Australia - NSW Division 2015 Awards for Planning Excellence in the category Public Engagement and Community Planning. The Awards were announced on 11 November 2015 and Council’s submission was the winner in our category. As a State Award winner we are now automatically entered into the Australia-wide Awards which will be decided in May 2016.

 

Background

 

Council began the strategy in 2014 having decided to adopt the World Health Organisation (WHO) Global Age-Friendly Cities Project Guidelines. In July, Council received a Report that outlined the fact that the background work on the strategy was complete and had been submitted to WHO. Lane Cove became the first Council in New South Wales to become a member of the WHO Global Network of Age-friendly Cities and Communities and provided Council with a WHO Certificate of Membership.

 

Discussion

 

The panel was impressed that Council through the strategy demonstrated a significant level of commitment to creating an “Age-Friendly City or Community” in the Lane Cove Council area.

 

The WHO active ageing approach, which was followed in assembling this strategy is quite prescriptive as to the type of consultation undertaken, emphasising a bottom up approach and it also is prescriptive in the eight domains that need to be addressed:-

1.   Outdoor spaces and buildings;

2.   Transportation

3.   Housing;

4.   Social participation

5.   Respect and social inclusion;

6.   Civic participation and employment;

7.   Communication and information; and

8.   Community support and health services.

 

The Award judging Committee stated that the project caught its attention because of its integration into the rest of the Local Government Associations (LGA) strategy, and its aging community. The Council applied international best practice standards and developed a strategy that included an empirical rating tool that could be widely used across Australia. The strategy development included consultation with a group that is often difficult to bring into the planning process.

 

Lane Cove’s Strategy for an Age-Friendly Lane Cove aims to make the Council area a good place for older people to live, work and visit. The programme targets the environmental, social and economic factors that influence the health and wellbeing of older adults.

 

The judges were impressed by Council in the process of assessing a city’s strengths and gaps, involved older people at various stages of assessment. The programme not only included the experience of older people in the city, but also developed social cohesion and support to lone households. The programme aided council but simultaneously helped form new support networks and friends.

 

Conclusion

 

As the winner of one of the New South Wales Planning Institute Awards, the Age-friendly Strategy automatically becomes an entry in the Australia-wide Planning Awards which will be announced in May 2016.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted and Council staff be congratulated on their excellent work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Gornall

Executive Manager - Human Services

Human Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 16 November 2015

1st Quarter Review of the 2015-2016 Budget

 

 

Subject:          1st Quarter Review of the 2015-2016 Budget    

Record No:     SU757 - 65457/15

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):       Craig Dalli 

 

 

Executive Summary

The First Quarter 2015 - 2016 Budget Review involves a variety of variations in both income and expenditure. It is recommended that the Budget be varied in terms of the report.

 

Background

 

Council is required to prepare a Budget Review Statement each quarter, in accordance with Clause 203 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005. This report is prepared in accordance with the clause for the period ending 30 September 2015. The Office of Local Government has issued a prescribed format for reviews which is included as an attachment to this report. The purpose of these reviews is to ensure that the impact of financial variations are reflected in the forecast of Council’s global budgetary position to 30 June 2016, and the adopted Budget adjusted accordingly.

 

Discussion

The following is a summary of Council’s adopted Budget for 2015 - 2016 and the revised Budget following the adjustments included in this report:-

 

 

Original Budget

(000’s)

Adjustments

(000’s)

Revised

Budget

(000’s)

Expenditure - Operating

$38,930

$ 261

$39,191

Income - Operating

$50,176

$ 272

$50,448

Surplus/ (Deficit)

$11,246

$   11

$11,257

Surplus/(Deficit) before

Capital Grants/Contributions

$ 389

 

$  400

 

Operating Expenditure

Adjustments are recommended to the operating expense items accounts as shown in AT-1 for a total of $261,000.  The majority of these adjustments are unexpended grants from 2014-15.  In addition there have been minor amendments for the LGNSW subscription, software licences and regulatory expenses.  Expenses for Market Square also increased due to the creation of a stratum that includes sinking funds not budgeted for.

Operating Income

Three (3) adjustments are recommended in this review for operating income.  A freeze of CPI adjustments to the Financial Assistance Grants requires a budget reduction of $18,000.  Also, growth in residential and business rates have exceeded estimates and are recommended to vary by $250,000 and $40,000 respectively.

Capital Expenditure

 

Recommended changes to capital expenditure have been made for construction of the traffic lights and community facility at 314 Burns Bay Road.  Also, a grant for bicycle facilities has been accepted, increasing the cycleways that can be constructed in 2015-16.  Completion of landscaping at Tambourine Bay Pool for the picnic area and decking required an additional $60,000 not budgeted for.

 

Conclusion

The following statement is made in accordance with Clause 203(2) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005.

It is my opinion that the quarterly Budget Review Statement for Lane Cove Council for the quarter ended 31 September 2015 indicates that Council's projected financial position will be satisfactory at year end 30 June 2016, having regard to the projected estimates of income and expenditure and the original budgeted income and expenditure.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the 2015 – 2016 Budget be varied as follows:-

 

 

Original Budget

(000’s)

Adjustments

(000’s)

Revised

Budget

(000’s)

Expenditure - Operating

$38,930

$ 261

$39,191

Income - Operating

$50,176

$ 272

$50,448

Surplus/ (Deficit)

$11,246

$   11

$11,257

Surplus/(Deficit) before

Capital Grants/Contributions

$ 389

 

$  400

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Budget Review for Quarter Ended 30 September 2015

6 Pages

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 November 2015

Sustainability Small Grants Round 11 - Recommended Recipients

 

 

Subject:          Sustainability Small Grants Round 11 - Recommended Recipients    

Record No:     SU5908 - 64247/15

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):       Katy Christian 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report advises of organisations seeking funds under Round 11 of the Sustainability Small Grants Program. Council received two (2) applications and recommends providing funding for both applications to the total of $3,100.

 

Background

 

Council, under Section 356 of the Local Government Act 1993, may grant financial assistance to organisations. This report discusses the application process for Round 11 of the Sustainability Small Grants Program and recommends Council provide the grants nominated. 

 

Under the Sustainability Small Grants Program Council calls for applications for financial assistance from organisations either based in Lane Cove Local Government Area (LGA), or if not based in the LGA, whose assistance addresses identified needs of people within the LGA. 

 

Community Organisations on Council’s Community Directory were notified of the Sustainability Small Grants Program, with the program also being promoted on Council’s website, through the Sustainability E-Newsletter and advertised in The Village Observer. Applications closed on Friday 25 September 2015.

 

Discussion

 

Applications were assessed against the criteria provided in AT-1 by a panel comprising the Chair of the Sustainability Advisory Committee, Council’s Sustainability Coordinator and Manager Environmental Health. Applicants were requested to show how their application would meet the needs of the Lane Cove community and promote and enhance our vision for sustainability in all its forms. Included in AT-2 is a summary of the applications, Small Grants Assessment Panel comments and recommendations.

 

Application Overview:

 

Greenwich Public School – Frog Legs and French Flies

 

This project would turn a degraded are of land into an aquatic ecosystem that would expand the school’s indigenous frog population.

 

FoodFaith – Planting Seeds Community Garden

 

This project would supply compost and worm farming infrastructure, tools, resident engagement materials and perennial plants to assist with the set up of a new community garden in the new Council Park at 314 Burns Bay Rd. 

 

FoodFaith is a community group who will take up a lease from Council to run the community garden in a section of the new park. This organisation is backed by UTS Institute of Sustainable Futures and has a steering group run by qualified horticultural professionals. Foodfaith aims to bring together different faiths and community groups to promote social cohesion, food and environmental sustainability through sharing cultures and community gardening. The project instils a sense of community, in addition to providing gardening infrastructure for surrounding units. 

 

The budget for the Sustainability Small Grants Program includes a provision of $12,000 in funding for this financial year (Round 11 and Round 12). A total of 35 local sustainability projects have been funded to date in rounds 1-10. 

 

Conclusion

 

Council’s Sustainability Small Grants Program assists the development of a broad range of initiatives that are of direct and practical benefit to a sustainable Lane Cove community. Furthermore Council’s Sustainability Action Plan provides guidance to assist in identifying priority projects for funding.  Applications for Round 11 of the Sustainability Small Grants Program closed on Friday 25 September 2015. It is recommended Council approve funding for the two (2) applications being:-

·      Greenwich Public School P&C; and

·      FoodFaith

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council:-

1.   Approve  funds under Round 11 of the Sustainability Small Grants Program for the following projects:-

·    $ 2,000 – Greenwich Public School P&C – Frogs Legs and French Flies; and

·    $ 1,100 – FoodFaith – Planting Seeds Community Garden; and

2.   Give Public Notice of the proposed funding under Round 11 of the Sustainability Small Grants Program and subject to no reasonable objections being received, grant the funds as outlined above.

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Selection Criteria for Round 11 of Sustainability Small Grants Program

1 Page

 

AT‑2 View

Round 11 Sustainability Small Grants Program – Recommendations of the Panel

1 Page

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 November 2015

Aquatic Centre Lift Report

 

 

Subject:          Aquatic Centre Lift Report    

Record No:     SU5997 - 67160/15

Division:         Human Services Division

Author(s):       Jane Gornall 

 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council has recently called for tenders in accordance with Council’s Tender and Quotation Procedure for the provision of a Replacement Lift at Lane Cove Aquatic Leisure Centre. This report provides details on the tender process conducted and recommends that the tender from Link Elevator Company Pty Ltd be accepted.

 

Discussion

 

The lift at the Lane Cove Aquatic Leisure Centre has become increasingly unreliable and expensive to maintain. Council tendered for a replacement lift in 2012, when there was proposed Federal Funding available for the upgrade, unfortunately once the tender was completed the funding was no longer available. As such the tender process was not proceeded with.

 

With the recent renovations of the Centre including the addition of an additional entrance, the use of the lift has reduced but it is still heavily used. It is primarily used by people with prams including those picking up and dropping off from the creche, people with a disability and people with mobility issues. When the lift is out of order these users of the service are greatly disadvantaged. The lift service company has also advised Council that the lift is nearing the end of its life.

 

Council appointed a firm of experienced lift consultants to assist with the technical issues relating to the lift replacement.  JCA Lift consultants developed the technical specification for the replacement of the lift. The lift poses special challenges due to the aggressive corrosive environment in which it has to operate. The technical specification was then combined with Council’s standard tendering requirements.

 

The  tender specification detailed the schedule of work, hours of work, safety requirements and reporting requirements.  The specification outlined that the tender submissions would be assessed based on the following criteria:-

 

Price:  (40%) based on the Tender Price and the comprehensive maintenance costs provided in the mandatory schedules.

 

Capability and Capacity: (25%)       

Past record and/or demonstrated ability to provide good/services;

·      The Tenderer's technical expertise; resource and financial management skills including; and

·      Proposed methods of service delivery.

To achieve the maximum score the tenderer is to have the capability to provide the goods and perform the services required, provide full details of personnel and equipment to carry out the work, management structure of the company and contingency plans to cover downtime and other unforeseen circumstances. 

Experience:  (25%)

·      The relevant experience of the Tenderer and key personnel and the extent of skills/qualifications of the people who will be engaged to carry out the contractor's obligations under the Contract;

·      Contracts of similar nature with other NSW Councils;

·      Demonstrated financial capability to provide the Work/Services at both a financial and operational level with a clearly identifiable management structure; and

·      Referees responses.

 

Reference checks were counted into this element of the assessment. A financial assessment was also conducted by Corporate Scorecard Pty Ltd.

 

Sustainability and Environment (5%) - Sustainability and Environment Assessment refers to the manner in which environmental issues are to be appropriately addressed, including commitment to due diligence and the principles of ecologically sustainable development (ESD) in regard to environmental legislation and documentation outlining past performance in regard to environment protection and enhancement initiatives.

 

To achieve the maximum score the tenderer needed to provide details of an environmental policy and answer yes to all applicable questions in the Environmental Survey included in the tender specification.

Occupational Health & Safety (5%) - Occupational Health and Safety refers to the tenderer’s commitment to and compliance with current Work, Health and Safety legislation.

 

To achieve the maximum score the tenderer is to have fully documented and certified Quality Assurance procedures to ISO 9001 along with OH&S certification to AS 4801.

 

The weightings for the above evaluation criteria were agreed in consultation with the consulting engineer from JCA Lift Consultants.

Council advertised the tender in the Sydney Morning Herald on Tuesday 25 August, Wednesday 26th August, Saturday 29th August 2015 and the North Shore Times on Wednesday 26th August 2015. Tenders closed at 2.00 p.m. on Tuesday 29th September, 2015 at 2.00pm. A site visit was conducted on Tuesday September 8, 2015. The tender was also advertised and conducted using the Tenderlink gateways. The Council received four submissions.

 

Tender Evaluation

 

The tender evaluation panel consisted of Council’s Executive Manager – Human Services, Council’s Manager – Facilities, Council’s Infrastructure Planner and the consultant from JCA Lift Consultants who provided technical advice on the project and prepared the specification. 

 


Each tender was assessed based on the above weighted criteria and ranked accordingly:-

 

Company

Price (40%)

Capability & Capacity (50%)

Sustainability & Environment (5%)

OHS

 

(5%)

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link Elevators          

Preferred

Equal Preferred

 

Equal Preferred

 

Preferred

Kleemann Elevators

 

 

 

 

 

Liftronics

 

Preferred

 

 

 

Avant Constructions

 

 

Preferred

Equal Preferred

 

 

Conclusion

 

A confidential memorandum has been circulated separately to Councillors detailing the prices submitted by each tenderer and details of the reference checks undertaken of the recommended tenderer.

 

Having recorded the highest score across all the weighted criteria and having received positive reference checks about the quality and reliability of their work, the Tender Panel recommends:-

 

 

1.   The tender for the provision of the Replacement lift at the Lane Cove Aquatic Leisure Centre be awarded to Link Elevators Company Pty Ltd for an amount of $159,500 (incl GST)

 

2.   The General Manager be authorised to enter into a contract with them. 

 

There are sufficient funds available in Council’s 2015-16 Budget for the project to proceed.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council endorse the recommendation from the Tender Panel for the provision of a replacement lift at the Lane Cove Aquatic Leisure Centre.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Gornall

Executive Manager - Human Services

Human Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 16 November 2015

Council's Annual Report 2014/15

 

 

Subject:          Council's Annual Report 2014/15    

Record No:     SU245 - 66512/15

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):       Kirsty Beram 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The Local Government Act requires all NSW Councils to prepare an Annual Report for the previous financial year by 30 November each year. Lane Cove Council’s Draft Annual Report for 2014/15 has been produced and this report recommends that Council adopt the Draft Annual Report and send a copy to the Minister for Local Government as required by the Local Government Act.

 

Discussion

 

Council’s Draft Annual Report for 2014/15 due to its size is attached electronically only as AT-1 and covers all of the matters listed in the Local Government Act to be addressed, in particular the financial information included in the Audited Financial Statements and the progress on achieving the projects and activities listed in the 2014/15 Delivery Program.

 

In order to maintain consistency amongst our Corporate Planning documents, the Draft Annual Report is organised into Council’s Six Strategic Planning Themes in the same way as the Lane Cove 2025 - Community Strategic Plan and Delivery Program and Operational Plan. This makes the Annual Report more user-friendly to the Lane Cove community as it groups information under each planning theme rather than by Council’s internal organisational structure.

 

The Draft Annual Report contains an introduction by the Mayor and General Manager which describes the highlights for 2014/15. These highlights are reproduced below for the Councillors and community’s information:-

“2014/15 has been a year of high quality and high volume delivery at Council. Long-term projects, new initiatives and community celebrations were consistently rolled out over the course of the year.

Lane Cove is now home to the largest synthetic sportsfield in the Northern Region following the successful completion of the Blackman Park synthetic sportsfields project in 2014. This project has resulted in increased usage by local and regional sporting groups who are taking advantage of increased access hours, reduced wet weather closures and a multipurpose field that accommodates a variety of sporting codes. The surrounding area has also been upgraded with a new creek and wetland featuring 10,000 new plants, one-third of which came from Council’s own community nursery.

The Lane Cove Plaza upgrade was officially opened in November 2014 with the inaugural Coffee Carnevale event. The buzz created on the day showcased the very intention of the upgrade – to enhance community and business use of the Plaza. This has been reinforced over the past 12 months with initiatives such as Lane Cove Night Out and Screen on the Green events creating opportunities for twilight activation of the Plaza through Council’s Love Where You Shop campaign.

Other facility upgrades throughout the year included the first renovation of Kindy Cove Child Care Centre since it opened almost 40 years ago; a gymnasium extension, new pool deck, new training rooms and new pool-deck entry at the Lane Cove Aquatic Centre; a new boardwalk and viewing platform connecting Greenwich Sailing Club and Greenwich Baths; construction of a new access road called Waterview Drive; upgrade of Council’s Civic Centre Heating, Ventilation and Cooling system; commencement of the Little Lane Carpark redevelopment and; commencement of the new community centre and park at 314 Burns Bay Road.

These upgrades, enhancements and new facilities provide the community with access to the quality of infrastructure they deserve. Council continues to exceed its asset-management requirements with a 186% asset management ratio this year.

Council has commenced significant public consultation regarding the St Leonards South Draft Master Plan, St Leonards Public Domain Master Plan and Rosenthal Avenue Design Ideas Competition. These major projects reflect two major areas of infrastructure development, one in St Leonards and the other in the heart of Lane Cove Village. St Leonards will provide the capacity to meet additional growth targets and to work on a strategic transport and public space project within the area. Rosenthal Avenue carpark redevelopment will complement the Little Lane Carpark by providing up to 500 underground car spaces as well as mixed retail and a large, purpose-built open space on top of the current asphalt car park.

Over the past 12 months Council has run over 400 community events – more than one a day over the calendar year. The emphasis on some of the new events was directly on building neighbourly relationships including Council’s new Meet the Neighbours event series. This initiative under Council’s Love Where You Live campaign helped Council receive the ‘Very Neighbourly Organisation’ status from Relationships Australia. Lane Cove was the first Council in Australia to receive the honour which aligns with the National Neighbour Day campaign.

Council also initiated its first International Women’s Day forum, developed its first Community Wellbeing Index and drafted its first Reconciliation Action Plan. Lane Cove Library presented its first Lane Cove Literary Awards which resulted in an overwhelming 560 entries from right across Australia. The Library also maintained its status as having the highest borrowing rate per capita in New South Wales.

Lane Cove continues to run successful bush care programs including the Backyard Habitat program which has 350 properties registered to date. Recently Council launched a complementary program, Bush Friends, which supports residents who live in properties adjoining bushland who wish to remove weeds beyond their property into Council land. Council also spent significant time and energy successfully lobbying to reduce the impact of the Rural Fire Service’s 10/50 Vegetation Code. Staff worked closely with the local community to monitor, record and advocate for the reduction of entitlement zones.

I am proud of Council’s achievements over the past 12 months and continue to be impressed by the commitment of staff to ensuring that our community receives the highest quality programs and infrastructure as we strive to meet their existing and future needs.”

 

Conclusion

 

The Draft Annual Report has been prepared to meet the requirements of the Local Government Act. Upon adoption of the Report, a copy will be forwarded to the Minister as required by the Act and will be publicly accessible via Council’s website, http://www.lanecove.nsw.gov.au.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.  Council adopt the Draft Annual Report at AT-1 for 2014/2015;

 

2.  The adopted Annual Report be forwarded to the Minister for Local Government; and

 

3.  The Annual Report be published on Council’s website.

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Draft Annual Report 2014-15 (20MB)

202 Pages

Available Electronically

 

  


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 November 2015

Create Lane Cove: Cultural Plan

 

 

Subject:          Create Lane Cove: Cultural Plan    

Record No:     SU5276 - 67275/15

Division:         Human Services Division

Author(s):       Corinne Dickinson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

In 2004 Lane Cove was one of the first councils in NSW to produce a Cultural Action Plan. Council went on to receive an Award from Local Government NSW for their efforts and over the past 10 years has embedded arts, culture and cultural diversity across Council activities.

This plan has ensured the successful implementation of new facilities, public art programs, festivals and programs for the benefit of the local community. To ensure it continues to benefit the whole community for years to come Council has reviewed the Plan and produced Create Lane Cove: A Cultural Plan.

This new Cultural Plan was produced following community consultation with a range of community cultural groups, stakeholders and staff and included an analysis of industry trends, facilities audit and gap analysis.

The vision of the Plan is that Lane Cove, its people and its places have a strong sense of cultural identity, connection and expression. As a result there are 11 themes which address both the existing strengths and the emerging trends. This includes:-

·    The need to identify services for the culturally and linguistically diverse communities;

·    The provision of a performing arts space;

·    Improved communication and reduced duplication of events;

·    Activities that address changing demographics and provide access to all members of the community; and

·    Supporting individual expression, creative economy and collaboration.

 

It is expected that this Plan encapsulates the needs of the community over the next 5 – 10 years with the view that it is flexible enough to evolve with any new trends. The actions within the Plan will be incorporated into Council’s Operational and Delivery Plan and reviewed in line with these regular work plans.

Background

 

Council’s previous plan Expressing Our Culture was developed in 2004. It was the first of its kind in Lane Cove and one of the earliest plans developed by a NSW Council.

 

For the purpose of cultural planning in Lane Cove, culture has been defined for both the previous and new plan as ‘anything that contributes to your quality of life, sense of place, feeling of community or local identity’.

 

With this definition in mind Council engaged SGL consulting to assist with a consultation process to assist in identifying the current and future needs of the community. The consultation launched on Harmony Day in March 2015 and ran through until the beginning of May 2015. The following forms of consultation were undertaken:

·    Community Groups – 20+ face-to-face meetings with key representatives from local cultural community groups within Lane Cove;

·    Key Staff Interviews – 18+ staff from across Council interviewed regarding their sector’s interests and priorities;

·    Cultural Advisory Committee – Met to discuss their interests and priorities for the community;

·    Community Consultation Meeting – A face-to-face meeting with community representatives to identify specific actions they see as beneficial to the community; and

·    Community Consultation Survey – An opt-in survey for community members to provide comprehensive feedback on their cultural interests, pursuits and opinions.

 

This information was then analysed in conjunction with emerging industry trends including the State Government’s new Arts and Cultural Policy for NSW as well as demographic analysis, facilities audit and a gap analysis to produce not only a set of priorities but also a context for the future cultural needs of the Lane Cove community.

Discussion

 

Create Lane Cove: A Cultural Plan attached at AT-1 has been produced and it features 11 themes and goals which will be achieved through a range of actions across Council.  As the Plan relies on collaboration and connection between Council and the community it is important that it is provided to the community for comment in draft form prior to formal adoption.  The below consultation provides for the process by which the Human Services Division will undertake the consultation.

Community Consultation

Consultation Statement of Intent

Consultation on the Draft Plan was planned to take part in two (2) phases. The first community engagement phase was carried out to gain relevant information from individuals, community groups and staff to identify the future needs that should be addressed in the Plan. The Draft Plan has now been developed and is ready for Public Exhibition and comment.

The second phase of the consultation has been designed to determine whether the themes, goals and actions now included within Create Lane Cove – A Cultural Plan are appropriate and supported by the community. Comments received will be used to refine goals and actions within the plan before the Plan is formally adopted.


Methods of Consultation

The methods of consultation proposed are outlined in the following Table. Initial engagement has already taken place as an information gather process. The final stage will be public exhibition of the draft plan which has an extended notification period to account for the holiday season.

Level of Participation

Involve

Consult

Form of Participation

Targeted

Open

Target Audience

Lane Cove Community and community cultural groups

Lane Cove Community

Proposed Medium

Advertisement and eNewsletter

Public Exhibition & Website Exhibition

Indicative Timing

November 2015 to January 2016

November 2015 to January 2016

 

Conclusion

Create Lane Cove: A Cultural Plan provides the framework for Lane Cove, its people and its places to have a strong sense of cultural identity, connection and expression

 

It is proposed that the Draft Create Lane Cove: A Cultural Plan document be placed on public exhibition for 9 weeks to allow for public comment, before reporting back to Council in February 2016.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:-

1.    The Draft Create Lane Cove Cultural Plan be placed on public exhibition for nine (9) weeks in accordance with the Consultation Strategy outlined in the report; and

2.    A Report be submitted to Council following the public exhibition period.

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Gornall

Executive Manager - Human Services

Human Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

DRAFT Create Lane Cove: A Cultural Plan

51 Pages

 

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 16 November 2015

1st Quarter Review of the 2015-16 Delivery Program and Operational Plan

 

 

Subject:          1st Quarter Review of the 2015-16 Delivery Program and Operational Plan    

Record No:     SU238 - 61483/15

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):       Kirsty Beram 

 

 

Executive Summary

This report outlines the 1st Quarter progress towards achieving the projects listed in the adopted 2015-16 Delivery Program and Operational Plan.  It is recommended that the report be received and noted.

Discussion

Council’s adopted 2015-16 Delivery Program and Operational Plan details the projects proposed to be undertaken during the financial year in order to meet the goals and objectives of Lane Cove 2025 - Community Strategic Plan. Council reports quarterly on the progress towards completing the projects and achieving the targets for the adopted performance measurements. The 1st Quarter Review of the 2015-16 Delivery Program and Operational Plan is shown attached as AT-1

 

The projects in the Quarterly Review are listed by the responsible Council Division and where the project has a completion date the ‘Action Status’ column graphically demonstrates the progress towards completion. The Review also includes a comment on the status of each project.

 

The Quarterly Review also provides a report on progress towards achieving the targets set for performance measurement for each Division of Council. A cumulative figure for performance measurement is shown so that performance can be tracked each quarter towards achieving the required target.

The highlights of the projects either commenced or completed for the 1st quarter include:-

·    StateCover Mutual annual WHS audit carried out with Council receiving a score of 85.9 (July)

·    St Leonards South Master Plan adopted (July);

·    Commenced the mattress collection service (July);

·    State of Origin Decider screened in the Lane Cove Plaza (July);

·    Undertook community consultation on proposed amendments to the Local Environmental Plan for the land at 302-314 Burns Bay Road (July to September);

·    Celebrated the Lane Cove Community Nursery 10 year anniversary (August);

·    Financial Assistance Grants to the value of $461,335 provided to 29 community groups for projects that encourage interaction and social cohesion (August);

·    Launch of Cameraygal Festival with the theme ‘Lane Cove Shines’ (August);

·    Partnered with Match Box Projects to deliver People Make Places: Lane Cove (August);

·    Hosted the Meet the Neighbours Event in Newlands Park with over 150 attendees (August);

·    Tender undertaken for Lane Cove Aquatic Centre Lift Replacement  (August to September);

·    Hosted the Great Euro Circus at Blackman Park (August to September);

·    Feasibility of the Rosenthal Avenue Car Park Project endorsed by Council (September);

·    Successful eWaste event held at St Ignatius’ College Riverview with over 40 tonnes of waste being collected and over 650 residents attending (September);

·    Called for Expressions of Interest for the Makers Markets Management (September); and

·    Hosted the second annual Coffee Carnevale in the Lane Cove Village (September).

·   

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the 1st Quarter Review of the 2015-16 Delivery Program and Operational Plan be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

1st Quarter Review of 2014 - 2015 Operational Plan

48 Pages

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 16 November 2015

Council Snapshot

 

 

Subject:          Council Snapshot    

Record No:     SU220 - 66950/15

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):       Craig Wrightson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Attached for the information of Councillors is a review of Council’s recent activities, entitled Council Snapshot.  This report provides a summary of the operations of each Division.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Council Snapshot - November 2015

48 Pages