m

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Agenda

Ordinary Council Meeting

20 July 2015

The meeting commences at 6.30pm. If members of the public are

not interested in any business recommended to be considered in

Closed Session or there is no such business, Council will ordinarily

  commence consideration of all other business at 7pm.

 


 

Notice of Meeting

 

Dear Councillors

 

Notice is given of the Ordinary Council Meeting, to be held in the Council Chambers, 48 Longueville Road Lane Cove on Monday 20 July 2015 commencing at 7:00pm. The business to be transacted at the meeting is included in this business paper.

 

Yours faithfully

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

 

Council Meeting Procedures

 

The Council meeting is chaired by the Mayor, Councillor David Brooks-Horn. Councillors are entitled to one vote on a matter. If votes are equal, the Chairperson has a second or casting vote. When a majority of Councillors vote in favour of a Motion it becomes a decision of the Council. Minutes of Council and Committee meetings are published on Council’s website www.lanecove.nsw.gov.au by 5pm on the Thursday following the meeting.

 

The Meeting is conducted in accordance with Council's Code of Meeting Practice. The order of business is listed in the Agenda on the next page. That order will be followed unless Council resolves to modify the order at the meeting. This may occur for example where the members of the public in attendance are interested in specific items on the agenda.

 

Members of the public may address the Council Meeting on any issue for a maximum of 3 minutes during the public forum which is held at the beginning of the meeting. All persons addressing the Meeting must speak to the Chair. Speakers and Councillors will not enter into general debate or ask questions.

 

If you do not understand any part of the information given above; require assistance to participate in the meeting due to a disability; or wish to obtain information in relation to Council, please contact Council’s Manager Governance on 99113525.

 

Please note meetings held in the Council Chambers are recorded on tape for the purposes of verifying the accuracy of minutes and the tapes are not disclosed to any third party under the Government Information (Public Access)  Act 2009, except as allowed under section 18(1) or section 19(1) of the PPIP Act, or where Council is compelled to do so by court order, warrant or subpoena or by any other legislation.

 

 

 


Ordinary Council 20 July 2015

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

APOLOGIES

 

OPENING OF MEETING WITH PRAYER

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT TO COUNTRY

 

NOTICE OF WEBCASTING OF MEETING

 

public forum

 

Members of the public may address the Council Meeting on any issue for 3 minutes.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

 

1.      ORDINARY COUNCIL MEETING - 15 JUNE 2015 AND 13 JULY 2015

 

Orders Of The Day

 

Notices of Motion

 

2.      Recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People in the Australian Constitution

 

3.      Affordable Housing In Lane Cove

 

Officer Reports for Determination

 

4.      Results of Feasibility Study for the Proposed Redevelopment of 266 Longueville Road as a Seniors Living Facility

 

5.      River and Northwood Road Intersection Traffic Study

 

6.      Proposed Alcohol Free Zones for Lane Cove Plaza & St Leonard's CBD

 

7.      Nuisance Birds - Lane Cove Plaza

 

8.      June 2015 Traffic Committee

 

9.      Local Government Conference NSW 2015

 

10.    LEP Review 2015

 

Officer Reports for Information

 

11.    Little Lane Car Park Progress Update

 

12.    Centennial Ave/ Barwon Rd/ Fig Tree St Intersection Safety Analysis

 

13.    Public Exibition by NSW Environment Protection Authority of Protection of the Environment Operations (Clean Air) Amendment (Cruise Ships) Regulation

 

14.    Waste Management - Mission Australia - Soft Landing - Mattress Collection and Recycling System

 

15.    Residential Development Activity Statistics

 

16.    Council Snapshot  

 

 

 

 

                   


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2015

Recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People in the Australian Constitution

 

 

Subject:          Recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People in the Australian Constitution    

Record No:     SU4096 - 40165/15

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):       Councillor Scott Bennison 

 

 

 

Background

The Prime Minister, Hon Tony Abbott stated in 2014 that he would use 2014 to start a "conversation" about recognising Indigenous Australians in the constitution.  The RECOGNISE campaign was started by the Reconciliation Board of Australia as a “people’s movement to RECOGNISE Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in the Australian Constitution and ensure there’s no place in it for racial discrimination.”  It seeks to raise awareness of the issues surrounding exclusion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders from the Australian Constitution and stamp out inherent racial discrimination.  According to the RECOGNISE website over a quarter of a million Australian’s have already declared their support to have Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people recognised within the Australian Constitution.

“We want to see fairness and respect at the heart of our Constitution, and to ensure racial discrimination has no place in it. Our goal is a more united nation. This is a chance for Australia to acknowledge the first chapter of our national story, and to forge our future together”.

Discussion

On the 6 July 2015 Prime Minister, the Hon Tony Abbott, the Opposition Leader and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders affirmed the commitment of the Australian Federal Parliament to hold a referendum to RECOGNISE Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in the Australian Constitution. 

The Sydney Morning Herald reported on the same day that a Fairfax Ipsos National Poll found that 85% of voters support recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders as the first inhabitants in Australia in the Constitution.  Given that changes to the constitution are difficult to achieve, the best chance of success is through consultation of local communities.  Council is able to assist in this process by becoming a partner of the RECOGNISE campaign by adopting the ‘Network Charter’, attached as AT-1, and starting the conversation at a local level.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:-

1.  Council become a part of the RECOGNISE campaign by adopting the Partners Network Charter;

2.  The following motion be submitted to the 2015 NSW Local Government Conference as a motion from Council:-

a.   That Local Government NSW becomes part of the RECOGNISE campaign by adopting the Partners Network Charter;

b.   That Local Government NSW in conjunction with RECOGNISE, assist member councils to develop strategies to promote the work of RECOGNISE

3.  Council in conjunction with RECOGNISE arrange a series of community consultations;

4.  That the Mayor write to the following and advise them that Council supports RECOGNISE and has adopted the Partners Network Charter and is seeking simular support from other NSW Councils at the 2015 Local Government Conference:-

a.   Professor Megan Davis, member of the Expert Panel on Constitutional Recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders;

b.   Warren Mundine c/o the Prime Minister’s Indigenous Advisory Council;

c.   The Prime Minster, the Hon Tony Abbott;

d.   The Prime Minister's Expert Panel on the Recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples;

e.   Roy Ah-See c/- NSW Metropolitan Aboriginal Land Council;

f.    Ben Shields and Rod Towney c/- Dubbo City Council; and

g.   Darren Toomey c/- Dubbo Aboriginal Land Council.

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor Scott Bennison

Councillor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

RECOGNISE Partner Network Charter

1 Page

 

AT‑2 View

RECOGNISE Media Release

2 Pages

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2015

Affordable Housing In Lane Cove

 

 

Subject:          Affordable Housing In Lane Cove    

Record No:     SU5369 - 40172/15

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):       Councillor Scott Bennison 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the General Manager write to the Federal Treasurer the Hon Joe Hockey and put forward the following as ideas that may assist in making housing more affordable for home buyers in the Lane Cove LGA:-

1.   Amend the Anti-Money Laundering and Counter-Terrorism Financing Act 2006 (AML) to include real estate agents;

2.   Introduce legislation that requires all Non-Citizens/Residents when acquiring real estate to provide a tax file number;

3.   Introduce legislation that allows the restriction of the sale of units from time to time to Non-Citizens/Residents based on economic conditions; and

4.   Amend the Income Tax Assessment Act so that:-

a.         Negative gearing of property is only available to citizens of Australia; and

b.         For Non-Citizens, any losses are quarantined until such time the tax payer becomes a citizen.

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor Scott Bennison

Councillor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

   


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2015

Results of Feasibility Study for the Proposed Redevelopment of 266 Longueville Road as a Seniors Living Facility

 

 

Subject:          Results of Feasibility Study for the Proposed Redevelopment of 266 Longueville Road as a Seniors Living Facility    

Record No:     SU4567 - 39655/15

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):       Geoff Douglas 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The Major Projects Strategic Plan 2007 – 2016 identified a number of Council assets which could be developed to enable better social and community outcomes for residents and ratepayers.  The Bowling Green at 266 Longueville Road was one of the sites identified, and work is now progressing to provide for a Seniors Living facility at that location. 

 

Consultants engaged by Council have now identified that there is an undersupply of good quality Seniors Living accommodation in Lane Cove and that in the future the demand for this type of accommodation will increase.

 

In the near and medium term, the ageing population of Lane Cove will be seeking to move from their existing situation (often ‘empty nester’ homes that are difficult to maintain) into a thoughtfully considered retirement community.  Such a community will bring together like minded people who are well served by accommodation that has been specifically designed for their needs, and which is close to shops and transport.  Most importantly it will allow retirees to remain living in the Lane Cove community where often times they have long established social networks.

 

This report outlines the work undertaken by The Bridge Advisory Group, who are specialist consultants engaged by Council to assess the need of such accommodation in our community, and to determine if such a proposal is likely to represent a feasibility business opportunity for a Retirement Living operator.  The preliminary financial evaluation by the consultant is that one of three options assessed is likely to be feasible on the basis of a long-term lease.

 

Council would realise value from the transaction and would retain ownership of the land but would otherwise have no design build or operation role or risk in the development.

The report concludes by seeking Council’s endorsement to proceed to an EOI and then Selected Tender process to elicit commercial proposals from the market for the design construction and operation of a Retirement Living facility on the site.

 

Background

 

The site at 266 Longueville Road was identified in 2007 as a potential development site in Council’s Major Projects Plan.  Extensive community consultation at the time revealed that the majority of the Community supported both the Major Projects Plan and development on the 266 Longueville Road site.

 

Council has identified the opportunity to develop Seniors Living units on this site, along with an onsite park and an accessible pathway to a proposed recreation facility on the Golf Course. The proposed development will satisfy specific actions in Council’s Seniors Social Plan.

 

Lane Cove has an aging population and Council wish to ensure that people can age within their local area. One way of achieving this is to provide housing stock in the area that suits older residents. This development would provide local residents with the choice of downsizing from the family home to an apartment that is designed to be adaptable to their changing needs as they age.

 

In 2013 Council consulted with the community to amend the planning controls under the LEP 2009 and DCP 2010 for the western part of 266 Longueville Road, Lane Cove and to reclassify the land under the LEP from 'community' to 'operational' land. These planning amendments would permit seniors living/ retirement accommodation on the former bowling club site, in accordance with the Lane Cove Major Projects Plan 2007-2016.

 

 

Following the consultation which included a Public Hearing, Council considered the matter at its meeting of 17 March 2014 and resolved:-

“1.        Note the Public Hearing report by E B Armstrong P/L.

2.         Based on the evidence provided in this report, adopt the Planning Proposal with the following change:-

a)    Amend the Maximum Building Height from RL 65.5 to RL 62.8 to better comply with the surrounding developments.

3.         Forward the amended planning proposal to NSW Planning & Infrastructure requesting that they:-

a)    Determine whether the FSR should be 1.1:1 as sought by Council or 1:1 as recommended by the Commissioner.

b)    Reclassify part of 266 Longueville Road (Part Lot 1 DP 91655) identified in the planning proposal from community to operational land – no interests changed; and

c)    Reclassify part of 266 Longueville Road (Part Lot 322 DP 1102537 & Lot 1 DP 321353) identified in the planning proposal from community to operational land – interests changed  and remove public reserve status, as described in the planning proposal including obtaining any appropriate approval of the Governor under section 30(2) of the Local Government Act 1993.

4.         Adopt the Development Control Plan for 266 Longueville Road into Part C Residential Localities as Locality 7 266 Longueville Road of Council’s Development Control Plan and the Development Control Plan come into force after Gazettal of the LEP by newspaper advertisement providing 28 days notice.

5.         Write to all those who made submissions to the public exhibition and public hearing, advising them of the Council’s resolution.”

 

The Department of Planning and Environment subsequently determined that the FSR should be 1.1:1 as sought by Council, and then have proceeded to finalise the LEP. There has been considerable delay in finalisation of the LEP amendment. The Department has now advised that the process is now approaching completion and Gazettal is imminent.

 

Feasibility Study / Business Case

 

In preparation for the next stage of the project, fee proposals were sought from several Seniors Living and Aged Care Housing Consultants to conduct a feasibility study for a Seniors Living / Aged Care development on the site.

 

Bridge Advisory Group was selected to prepare the study, the scope comprised the following:

·    Undertake a market analysis based on the LGA;

·    Identify trends in the Seniors Living and Aged Care sector;

·    Identify the proposed accommodation and operational and service elements that would be appropriate for the Lane Cove market;

·    Prepare a development concept plan and cost estimate; and

·    Prepare a development business case and financial model.

 

The Bridge Advisory Group had relevant experience in advising local government in Retirement Living and Residential Aged Care projects, and they put forward a consultant team comprising an architect with specific Senior’s Living experience, a Seniors facility management expert, a construction cost consultant, and a financial analyst with appropriate Senior’s Living project experience.

 

A full copy of the “Lane Cove Council Seniors Living Feasibility Study” (the Bridge Report) has been circulated to Councillors separately on a confidential basis.

 

Discussion

 

Social Objective – Housing Seniors in Lane Cove

 

Policy reform and Federal State and Local Government levels have provided a framework for Australia’s ageing population, aimed at overcoming barriers that get in the way of older people realising their full potential.  NSROC[1] has identified Four Regional Priorities on Ageing that focus on Access/Mobility; Housing Choice; Building Community; and Connecting people through technology and awareness.

Council has given consideration to the accommodation needs of its ageing population in several policy documents.  Lane Cove Seniors Social Plan 2010-2014 observes that:

“People are living longer, and leading healthier lives for longer.  There are more ‘young-old’ retirees seeking housing suited to their active lifestyles.  There is an increase in the number of frail, very old people (especially older women living on their own) creating a greater demand for housing that incorporates some forms of support.  For people over the age of 55 this means housing which is adaptable, low maintenance, secure and enhances their independence.  There is a lag in housing adjustment to these social trends.  New housing construction continues to be dominated by family housing and fails to offer the range of choices that are attractive and affordable to many older homeowners”[2].

 

Goal S3 of the Social Plan aims to support Seniors to remain in their homes and in the Lane Cove community.  It states:

“Encourage the creation of more accessible and affordable housing which is appropriate for Seniors. This includes the specific provision of self-care units in new developments, as well as promoting the concepts of Universal Housing design in all new housing and renovations. Universal Housing principles should be incorporated within Council’s Access Development Control Plan (DCP)”[3].

 

Council’s ‘Community Strategic Plan 2025’ has a goal to create a Built Environment that is “well developed, liveable and connected” and to “promote a range of sustainable housing options in response to changing demographics”.

 

The proposal of providing Seniors accommodation on the 266 Longueville Road site will fulfil an important community objective by providing Lane Cove residents an opportunity to “age in place” and remain part of and connected to the community that they have lived in, often for many years. 

 

Socio Economic Profile of the Catchment

 

The Bridge Report observes that the majority of Lane Cove catchment comprises households with dependent children who were born in Australia or other English speaking countries.  The percentage of immigrants from China and India is slightly higher within the catchment compared to state averages.  The catchment boasts strong median house prices, high levels of home ownership, and weekly household income that is significantly higher than State averages.  These demographic aspects underpin the product definition for the project.

 

Growing Seniors Population

 

The table below shows the projected population growth within the Lane Cove Catchment for the 20 year period from 2011 to 2031.  Based on the Bridge Advisory Group assessment, during this time the catchment population is expected to grow by 36%, while the 65+ population grows by approximately 59% and 85+ populations grow by 63%.


Existing Facilities

The Lane Cove catchment is served by five Residential Age Care [RAC] facilities and four local (plus another two) Retirement Living Facilities (two Retirement Living Facilities [RL] are in close proximity to the Lane Cove LGA). 

Residential Aged Care [RAC]

The catchment is served by five existing RAC facilities providing a total 325 beds:

Lane Cove LGA

# Beds

Maximum Refundable Deposit

Daily Rate

Glenwood  

56

$300K

$52

Caroline Chisholm

79

$199K

$35

Kamilaroi

74

$283K

$49

Lynvale

74

$300K

$52

St Columbus

42

$450K

$78

 

The Bridge Report notes that the supply and demand of RAC places in the catchment is at present in relative balance based on government targets of 80 RAC beds per 1,000 persons aged 70 and over.  It notes that with population growth it will be necessary to provide on average approximately an additional 10 RAC beds per annum in coming years to meet projected demand. 

 

The graph below shows that in the next 17 years there can be an expected demand for an additional 100 to 180 RAC beds in the Lane Cove catchment, equal to a 30 to 55% increase.

Retirement Living [RL]

 

The catchment is served by three existing RL facilities (plus two in Willoughby LGA that are sufficiently close to warrant inclusion) providing a total 358 units comprising various bedroom configurations:

 

Lane Cove LGA

# Units

Pricing

Remarks

Waterbrook  

78

$1.8m - $3.8m

2, 3,+ 4 bed apartments.  High quality.

Caroline Chisholm

48

$70K - $240K

Studio + 1 bed apartments

Northcott Gardens

57

$130K

Ingoing contrib.  One bed apts

Pottery Gardens

65

$12K

Ingoing contrib. / time pay / cap % pension. 

Willoughby LGA

# Units

Pricing

Remarks

Lane Cove Gardens

83

$450K - $650K

1 + 2 bed apts

St Peter’s Green

27

$ unavailable

 

 

The Bridge Report states that using the ABS estimation of the 2014 catchment population, there are approximately 73 RL units per 1,000 people aged 70 and over.  Based on the expected uplift in that population, the report forecasts an increase in demand of approx 140 additional retirement living units up to 2031, as per the following graph. 

Based on the above forecasts it seems certain that there is a need in the coming years to provide more RL and RAC facilities to fulfil the needs of older and ageing Lane Cove residents.

 

Senior’s Living – Accommodation Needs

 

The Bridge Report highlights the following key preferences in Senior’s housing:-

·    Community and lifestyle;

·    Care services;

·    Apartment size space and mobility; and

·    Staying close to home.

 

The report observes that notwithstanding the definition of “Seniors Living” as being 55+, however with increasing life spans and improvements in the health of many seniors means the average age of admission to a retirement village is 73 years old, and the average age of residents is 79. 

 

These patterns are resulting in a higher level of recognition in the industry that appropriately designed seniors living accommodation should allow people to remain in their home for longer than previously have.  The increasing blurring of lines between the Retirement Living concept and Residential Aged Care model is so that Retirement Living residents will receive a level of assistance and care within their home, thus delaying the time when their care needs require a move into a Residential Aged Care facility.  In this model people are relocated to a Residential Aged Care facility at a much later age.

 

There is some evidence that some new Retirement Living developments are including a percentage of Retirement Aged Care beds within them to allow this transition to occur on the same site.  This allows the aged person requiring a higher level of care to remain within their existing community without the disruption associated with their removal to a separate RAC site.  This also helps to avoid the forced separation of one partner from the other should one remain independent and capable of staying on in the Retirement Living community.

 

The co-location of RL and RAC within the same development keeps communities together for longer which is understood to improve health and longevity outcomes.  State Environmental Planning Policy – Seniors Living (Seniors SEPP) Clause 45 “Vertical Village” is an instrument that encourages this model by allowing a 0.5 FSR bonus for a site that provides on-site support services (which broadly includes providing 3 meals per day / personal care / home nursing visits and assistance with housework, and in addition10% of dwellings are to be “affordable places”)

 

The Bridge Report looks at three options for development of the site at 266 Longueville Rd.  The third option allows for the 0.5 FSR bonus. 

 

The Site Specific DCP for 266 Longueville Road

 

The DCP for the site at 266 Longueville Road as prepared having regard to minimising the impact of any future development of the site on the immediate vicinity and in particular on adjacent properties.  The height constraint was set at RL 62.8, consistent with the neighbouring Timbertops development. 

 

The building elevations facing Longueville Road (west boundary) will reflect existing  development on the north side by having the appearance of a two storey building.  The boundary setbacks contained in the site specific DCP augmented the standard setbacks in Council’s overall DCP.  This was to reflect specific site conditions.

 

The northern side boundary was increased to 12m and in part to 25m to preserve the fragment of bushland on that side of the site and to provide a significant buffer zone to preserve the amenity of the residential properties to the north of the site. 

 

It is also noted that the rear (eastern) boundary setback in the DCP identifies an APZ (Asset Protection Zone) of 20m, but the site is no longer categorised as Bushfire Prone Land meaning an APZ is no longer relevant.  Accordingly a setback of 9m from the vegetation line to the east has been adopted based on Cl 3.5.2 of the Lane Cove DCP for Residential Flat Buildings in all options.

 

The DCP is prescriptive in its application of building depth / distance between building requirements.  In option 2 of the Bridge Report the requirements of the Residential Flat Design Code take precedence (as is normally the case with DCP’s) which allows building depths to be increased (subject to the design satisfying solar penetration and cross ventilation performance requirements), and distance between buildings to be reduced in cases where privacy and amenity of habitable spaces is not compromised.  The effect of this is in fact to markedly improve the residential amenity with more apartments having access to northern sunlight and large spill out spaces.

 

Options for Development of the Site

 

The Bridge Report looks at three options for development of the site. 

·   Option 1 – Observes the DCP

·   Option 2 – Observes the DCP but with the Residential Flat Design Code requirements applying to depth of buildings and distance between buildings.

·   Option 3 – As for Option 2 but with the Seniors SEPP “Vertical Villages” 0.5 FSR bonus applied.

Option 1

This solution observes the DCP.  The overall yield from the FSR of 1.1:1 is 74 apartments and 2 levels of basement, one for parking and one for resident’s community facilities.  The built form distribution on site is concentrated within a smaller footprint to allow for all compliance with all DCP requirements eg. including setbacks, building depth, distance between buildings, etc.

Option 2

Option 2 observes the DCP but with the Residential Flat Design Code requirements applying to depth of buildings / distance between buildings.  The overall FSR to be achieved is the same as Option 1, i.e 1:1.1.  The apartment yield was similar to Option 1, although this option allowed for better site coverage with deeper buildings.  The quality of apartments in this option was improved with more apartments having access to the northern sunlight and having large spill out spaces in comparison.

Option 3

Option 3 – as for Option 2 but with the Seniors SEPP “Vertical Villages” 0.5 FSR bonus applied.  The overall FSR to be achieved increased to 1.6:1  The yield was 113 apartments of 2 and 3 bedroom apartments. The design provides large open spaces within apartments, maximises the views from the site and creates flexible community facilities for residents.

Consent Authority

 

The scale and value of the project means that the consent authority will be the JRPP.

 

Preliminary Financial Evaluation of the Options

 

The ultimate financial outcomes from the project will be the responsibility of the selected owner/operator to determine based on their own plans and accommodation services, capital cost estimates and operational models.  The purpose of this preliminary financial evaluation is to provide an overview of the potential returns available.

 

The financial feasibility assessment includes a preliminary estimate of the costs associated with the seniors living development based on the concept plans prepared by the architect, the potential revenue streams derived based on the market analysis and the possible financial outcomes that might be available to an owner/operator/developer that has capacity to develop this property in a manner consistent with Council objectives. Specifically, this assessment of preliminary financial outcomes included:-

·    Preparation of an initial financial cash flow model based on 40 year annual intervals;

·    Utilisation of the financial model as the basis for reviewing financial/commercial viability of the product options for the development;

·    Preparation of development and operational phase cash flows to review potential development margin, and present value of future income streams from Deferred Management Fees; and

·    Utilisation of the financial model to assess sensitivity analysis of key development metrics (capital cost, selling prices, etc) for impact on financial sustainability outcomes such as Net Present Value, Internal Rate of Return, etc.

 

A financial summary of the three development scenarios together with recommendations is provided in the Bridge Report that has been circulated to the Councillors on a confidential basis.

 

Development Model / Procurement Process

 

Council would have no role in designing, building or operating the facility other than to establish certain key design performance requirements such as the minimum size of apartments, the extent type and nature of community facilities to be provided.  Council would retain ownership of the land.

 

A two (2) step Tender Process is proposed:-

1.    Seek Expressions of Interest from relevant RL / RAC operators; and

2.    Following assessment of the EOI’s - invite selected tenderers to submit a proposal to design build and operate a RL or RL/RAC facility on a long-term lease.

 

A key component of the transaction would be the payment to Council of a sum of money which may be an upfront payment or possibly an annual payment or a combination of the two.

 

Subject to the quantum nature of the payment offered during the tender process, it would be Council’s intention to use those funds to provide other community facilities such as the additional sporting facilities associated with the adjacent Council owned Golf Course.  Such a project would have complimentary synergies with the proposed RL/RAC facility at 266 Longueville Road.

 

 

If as part of the EOI/Tender, respondents choose to take up the variations to the DCP that have been foreshadowed in Option 2 (i.e. building depth and distance between buildings to comply with Residential Flat Design Code not DCP), as well as the 9m eastern boundary setback in lieu of the APZ, it is proposed by this report that Council as landowner would allow DA’s which seek to justify those variations.

 

The following sets out the minimum objectives to be achieved from the amalgamated site:-

a)    A quality residential development which minimizes its impact on the neighbourhood;

b)    A focus on the livability in the residential component by:-

I.     Notwithstanding the minimum apartment sizes set out the new Apartment Design Guide, 80% of all apartments to meet the minimum areas previously recommended as best practice in the Residential Flat Design Code being:- .

·      Studio Internal Area 38.5m2, External Area 6m2

·      One bedroom - cross through, Internal 50m2 External 8m2

·      One bedroom - single aspect, Internal 63.4m2 External 10m2

·      Two bedroom - corner, Internal 80m2, External 11m2

·      Two bedroom - cross through, Internal 89m2 External 21m2

·      Two bedroom - cross-over, Internal 90m2 External 16m2

·      Three bedroom Internal Area 124m2 External Area 24m2

II.    To encourage social interaction, a minimum of 80sqm of well designed communal space shall be provided within the development in an appropriate location;

c)    Minimise the environmental impact of the proposed development by incorporating sustainability design principles; and

d)    Minimise Council’s risks through an appropriate development strategy.

In selecting the right development partner Council noted the advice contained in the Bridge Report to target the best available in the industry which would include identifying:

·    An experienced seniors living operator with a strong brand and reputation;

·    An operator with a strong balance sheet and overall financial position, capable of undertaking a development of this scale;

·    An operator with a long term commitment to the seniors living industry in terms of understanding global trends in ageing and the need to develop integrated communities in this catchment; and

·    An operator with shared values and culture alignment.

 

Conclusion

 

The residents of Lane Cove are not currently served by an adequate choice of good quality Retirement Living options within the LGA.  “Ageing in Place’, maintaining existing social networks and keeping communities together is a key part of healthy ageing.  Looking forward there is a growing need to provide additional Retirement Living and Residential Aged Care facilities within the area.  

The site at 266 Longueville Road is one of the only sites in the LGA with sufficient size to accommodate this much needed facility.  The Bridge Report demonstrates that the business case supports the development under a long term lease of the site to the private sector. It is therefore recommended that Council proceed with the procurement strategy outlined in the report.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council:-

1.   Note the  report, and the contents and recommendations of the Bridge Report which has been confidentially circulated to Councillors; and

2.   Approve the Development Model / Procurement Process outlined in the report and commence by calling for Expressions of Interest from suitably experienced seniors living operators upon Gazettal of the LEP.

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2015

River and Northwood Road Intersection Traffic Study

 

 

Subject:          River and Northwood Road Intersection Traffic Study    

Record No:     SU5776 - 32724/15

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):       Diana Zagora 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The intersection of River and Northwood Road was identified for potential RMS Safer Roads funding by Council in September 2014, due to the head-on, right-turning and off-path crashes occurring at the intersection and the approaches to the intersection. The following report sets out the background analysis of road safety and traffic data at the intersection, provides key findings on the intersection and outlines recommendations to address the issue of road safety and traffic flow.

 

Background

 

A number of recurring traffic and road safety concerns relating to this intersection have been brought to Council’s attention over recent years.  The following provides some examples of concerns raised however does not necessarily represent all of the issues:-

·    Current Intersection Layout

The current T-Junction layout of the intersection, provides limited visibility of westbound vehicles on River Road and this may contribute to the high incidence of right turning crashes, off-path and head-on crashes occurring on River Road. Further east on River Road, outside the entrance to the Lane Cove Country Club, head on crashes have resulted in five injuries at this location in the five years from July 2009 – June 2014.

·    Pedestrians and Cyclists

There are currently no safe crossing points for pedestrians or cyclists at the intersection of River and Northwood Road. The large traffic island makes crossing Northwood Road difficult at this location.

·    Public Transport

The Sydney Bus Service 261 travels between Lane Cove shopping centre and the QVB in the City. Buses accessing Northwood turn right into Northwood Road and travel along Northwood Road to Point Road, then travel back along Northwood Road before turning left into Arabella Street, Stuart Street and Kenneth Street before turning right towards River Road and continue to Crows Nest. On a weekday, there are up to 100 bus movements through this intersection.

·    Traffic Flow

The most recent SIDRA modelling of the intersection of River Road and Northwood Road was undertaken in September 2014. The current Level of Service (LOS) for the River Road and Northwood Road T-Junction is an overall poor LOS F in both the AM and PM Peak periods (Henson Consulting, September 2014). During the afternoon, the right turning movement from Northwood Road into River Road experiences high delays reflecting a poor level of service. Overall traffic flow needs to be improved at this intersection.

 


Discussion

 

To improve road safety, road geometry, traffic capacity and pedestrian / cyclist accessibility at the intersection of River Road and Northwood Road, a number of options were identified as part of the River and Northwood Intersection Traffic Study’, attached as AT-1. These options have been analysed by Council’s Traffic team and are outlined below, with Option 3 being the preferred option:-

 

Option 1: Seagull Arrangement

 

A seagull arrangement at the intersection of River Road and Northwood Road would facilitate the right turning manoeuvre into and out of Northwood Road for vehicles. However, the reduction of the eastbound capacity along River Road from two lanes to one through and one right would result in congestion and delays. For this reason, this option was not progressed.

 

Option 2: Roundabout

 

A two lane roundabout would be required to cater for existing volumes along River Road. A roundabout at this location would not fully accommodate pedestrian desire lines and could potentially make crossing at this location difficult for pedestrians. The major property acquisition could be a considerable expense and this option was not progressed.

 

Option 3: New Traffic Signals (Preferred)

 

Provision of new traffic signals with pedestrian crossing facilities, a right turning lane from River Road into Northwood Road and a shared path for pedestrians and cyclists, is the preferred option to provide road safety, capacity and journey time benefits. A concept design for a signalised intersection at River and Northwood Road has been produced by Consultants Transport & Urban Planning and is attached as AT-2.

 

The following features of the preferred option will enhance road safety and improve traffic flow:-

·     Signalisation of the intersection of River Road and Northwood Road to improve road safety, capacity and journey times, particularly for right turning vehicles, buses and motorcyclists;

·     Signalisation of the intersection will provide a safer pedestrian and cyclist crossing point to reach nearby schools, hospital and recreation precincts;

·     Construction of a four lane divided carriageway on River Road between McMahons Road and west of Stevenson Street will improve sight distances and align traffic lanes to provide a consistent road environment and improve safety;

·     Introduction of a pedestrian and cyclist shared path will provide an improved facility for pedestrians and cyclists;

·     The shared path will complement the existing cycling and pedestrian network;

·     Pedestrian accessibility improved, with new kerb ramps and footpaths at the intersection and better pedestrian access to existing bus stops;

·     Bus manoeuvrability may be improved through the intersection with potential benefits to bus journey times for public transport passengers onboard the 100 buses which drive through the intersection on a weekday;

·     Introduction of a northern leg at the signalised intersection of River / Northwood Roads to provide access to the recreation precinct at the golf course, will allow the current access driveway on River Road to be removed and hence reduce the vehicular conflicts and injury crashes occurring at this location; and

·     Improved access to the Golf Course will allow buses, vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists to access this recreation precinct

 

The intersection at River and Northwood Roads has been identified as a site for potential RMS Black Spot funding. It is proposed to submit an application for Black Spot funding to RMS for the 2016/17 financial year.

 

Complete Urban Pty Ltd prepared preliminary construction cost estimates for two (2) options. The first option is to upgrade the intersection to be signalised, excluding the proposed access road to the Golf course, the cost estimate for this option is in the order of $700k - $800k, excluding any land acquisition cost. The second option is to upgrade the intersection to be signalised, including the proposed access road to the Golf course, this estimate is in the order of $1.3M - $1.4M, excluding the land acquisition cost. It is proposed to submit both options in the Black Spot funding application to upgrade the intersection of River and Northwood Roads.

 

The Australian Government Black Spot Program provides 100% funding for projects whilst the Safer Roads State Program provides 50/50 funding. RMS will notify Council of the outcome in February 2016.

 

Conclusion

 

A number of recurring traffic and road safety concerns including reduced visibility, pedestrian and cyclist safety, high volume of public buses, and delayed traffic flow, have been brought to Council’s attention over recent years.  The ‘River and Northwood Intersection Traffic Study’ was prepared and identifies options for improving safety and capacity at this intersection.  The provision of new traffic signals with pedestrian crossing facilities, a right turning lane from River Road into Northwood Road and a shared path for pedestrians and cyclists is the preferred option to provide road safety, capacity and journey time benefits.  It is recommended that further investigation and a detailed Design Concept Plan for a signalised intersection at River Road and Northwood Road be developed for endorsement by Council and subsequent community consultation.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:-

1.   Further investigation including traffic surveys and intersection modelling, be undertaken at Northwood Road and River Road;

2.  Council to seek approval from the Roads & Maritime Services (RMS) on the proposed signal design and civil plans; and

3.   A further report be received by Council for endorsement prior to Community Consultation on the Concept Plan.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

River and Northwood Road Intersection Traffic Study

13 Pages

 

AT‑2 View

Concept TCS River Northwood LANECOVE

1 Page

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2015

Proposed Alcohol Free Zones for Lane Cove Plaza & St Leonard's CBD

 

 

Subject:          Proposed Alcohol Free Zones for Lane Cove Plaza & St Leonard's CBD    

Record No:     SU3530 - 36097/15

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):       David Wilson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

At its meeting of 18 May 2015, Council resolved to place on exhibition a proposal to declare the Lane Cove Plaza and St Leonard’s Central Business District as Alcohol Free Zones/Alcohol Prohibited Areas.  Consultation has been undertaken with the Local Area Command (Police), local residents as well as affected businesses, in accordance with the Department of Local Government’s Guidelines for Establishing Alcohol Prohibited Areas (APA’s) and Alcohol Free Zones (AFZ’s).  Council received a total of 19 written submissions, of these 10 were in favour, a further nine (9) were opposed, to the declaration of AFZ / APA’s in one (1) or more of the proposed locations.

 

Most submissions received related to the proposal for the Plaza with concerns that reports of unruly behaviour were not common place, and suggested that the proposal for an AFZ was not warranted and would interfere with the enjoyment of events within the Plaza. Although other members of the community advised that they were in full support of the proposal for the AFZ. 

 

Based on the response from the community and taking into account the feedback from police, it is recommended that APA / AFZ’s be established in Lane Cove Plaza with the exception of approved alfresco dining areas, and the St Leonard’s Central Business District effective from 1 August  2015, and be maintained until 1 August 2019.

 

Discussion

 

Legislation

 

Council is able to establish Alcohol Free Zones (AFZ’s) for roads, footpaths and car parks in accordance with Section 644 (4) of the Local Government Act, 1993 (the Act) that states:-

“(4) The proposed alcohol-free zone may comprise either or both of the following:

(a)   a public road or part of a public road,

(b)   a public place that is a car park or part of a car park.”

 

The primary purpose of this Section is to prohibit the drinking of alcohol on public streets.

 

In addition to regulate the consumption of alcohol in public parks and reserves, Council is able to establish Alcohol Prohibited Areas (APA) in accordance with Section 632A (4) that states:-

“(4) A council may declare any public place (or any part of a public place) in the council’s area to be an "alcohol prohibited area" for the purposes of this section. However, an alcohol prohibited area cannot be established in relation to a public place that is a public road (or part of a public road) or car park.”

 

The primary purpose of this Section is for police to have the power to seize, confiscate and dispose of alcohol where persons are found to be consuming alcohol in a public park.

 

Following Council’s Meeting of the 18 May 2015, the proposal to establish APA and AFZ’s was placed on public exhibition for six (6) weeks and has undertaken the following public consultation to obtain feedback and input into the proposal to establish APA’s and AFZ’s in the Lane Cove LGA:-

·    Public notices delivered to households in the areas affected by the proposal;

·    An advertisement in the North Shore Times newspaper;

·    Public Exhibitions at the Civic Centre and Lane Cove and Greenwich Libraries;

·    A website exhibition on Council’s website; and

·    eNewsletters to Council database of over 7,000 subscribers.

 

19 responses were received, with letters of support from the Local Area Command (Police), and 10 responses in support of the proposal with the following comments:-

·    Proposal was a good idea and should be supported;

·    AFZ’s are supported; and

·    Not only will this be to the better preservation of that great family village experience that we all, I am sure enjoy about Lane Cove; and

 

Nine (9) responses were received from residents opposing the proposal with the following comments:-

·    Establishing the APZ and APA’s was an overreaction to an isolated incidents.

·    We are in the middle of a number of projects intended to bring life into the plaza area of Lane Cove. It is a very pleasant, civilised and adult thing to enjoy these public events with a glass of wine.

·    I do not want my pleasure of partaking in a meal with an alcoholic drink ruined due to stupid laws which are implemented because of a few drunken idiots who should be kept under control by a police presence which we have now lost in Lane Cove.

·    I see a strong conflict of interest here, when council will license businesses in Lane Cove Plaza to be able to serve alcohol on the designated business only public areas, restricted for patrons only, but now want to ban others from bringing in and using alcohol in the plaza, to enjoy with their takeaway food from competing establishments.

 

Having regard to the above responses, in consultation with the Local Area Command, the following open space / public areas and roads in the Lane Cove LGA are proposed to be established as APA’s and AFZ’s from  1 August 2015 in accordance with Section 632A and Section 644 of the Local Government Act 1993:-

 

Proposed Alcohol Prohibited Areas:-

·    Lane Cove Plaza, Lane Cove

·    Open Space Area at the intersection of Pacific Highway and Canberra Avenue, St.Leonard’s.

 

Proposed Alcohol Free Zones:-

·    Area adjacent to Lane Cove Plaza, bounded by Longueville Road, Burns Bay Road, Birdwood Lane, Rosenthal Avenue and Austin Street.

·    Pacific Highway between Oxley Street and Greenwich Road, St Leonard’s

·    Canberra Avenue (between Marshall Avenue and Pacific Highway), St Leonard’s

 

The Police have advised that establishing APA’s and AFZ’s, it will allow them to manage and control these areas more effectively, where groups of people gather and consume alcohol that may result in the general amenity and safety of an area being negatively impacted upon.

 

Conclusion

 

Whilst the number of responses to the public consultation has not been significant (19 responses in total), 53% of responses were in support of Council’s proposal to establish AFZ’s and APA’s, in the areas proposed.

 

Feedback from this period of community consultation and for public areas and roads including the recently declared parks and reserves, and for Manns Point for New Year’s Eve has seen a general endorsement of these types of proposals, with minimal objections.  Therefore the establishment of APA’s & AFZ’s for the areas nominated in the Lane Cove LGA is recommended.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the following Alcohol Prohibited Areas and Alcohol Free Zones be established from 1 August 2015 in accordance with Section 632A and Section 644 of the Local Government Act 1993 and be maintained until the 1 August 2019:-

 

Alcohol Prohibited Areas (Public Parks and Reserves):-

·    Lane Cove Plaza, Lane Cove, with the exception of approved alfresco dining areas and Council authorised events; and

·    Open Space Area at the intersection of Pacific Highway and Canberra Avenue, St.Leonard’s.

 

Alcohol Free Zones (Streets, Car Parks and Footpaths):-

·    Area adjacent to Lane Cove Plaza, bounded by Longueville Road, Burns Bay Road, Birdwood Lane ,Rosenthal Avenue and Austin Street;

·    Pacific Highway  between Oxley Street and Greenwich Road, St Leonard’s; and

·   Canberra Avenue, (between Marshall Avenue and Pacific Highway) St Leonard’s.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2015

Nuisance Birds - Lane Cove Plaza

 

 

Subject:          Nuisance Birds - Lane Cove Plaza    

Record No:     SU699 - 36258/15

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):       David Wilson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Nuisance birds in the Lane Cove CBD have been an ongoing annoyance for a number of years with the roosting of birds in and around the Plaza, resulting in bird droppings in proximity of trees and dining structures. In more recent times the swooping of birds in and around areas where people are dining has also been a cause for concern.

 

It is proposed to trial a number of different control methods in an attempt to dissuade birds from roosting and flying into the Plaza area. From the research undertaken, it is apparent that cost effective solutions can be implemented, although as birds adapt quickly to a changing environment, the methods used to deter birds will also need to change.

 

Background

 

Council in the past few years has successfully worked with the community in a bird trapping program to eradicate Indian Myna birds in the locality. The program was based on members of the community undertaking trapping of Mynas at their homes or businesses and euthanizing them. Council also implemented a similar program in the Plaza with a degree of success.

 

Discussion

 

Lane Cove’s Plaza is the commercial centre of the LGA and increasingly the centre of village activities. With the recent significant upgrade, there is a greater expectation that the area is a clean area, where our community can enjoy outdoor dining and play areas without birds swooping or soiling the dining, seating and play areas.

 

In reviewing information from other authorities, the issue of nuisance birds is widespread often associated with dining areas. In reviewing these studies (see AT-1) it is apparent that most species of bird can become a nuisance, and some bird species are easier to control than others. It is important to note that birds are able to adapt to a changing environment, and as such strategies employed need to be varied, flexible and able to account for changes in behaviour.

 

It is proposed to engage a pest controller who specialises in bird control, to provide Council with cost effective solutions to prevent and / or limit the impact of nuisance birds on the Plaza assets (structures, paving etc) and patrons. An overview of some of the innovative products that are available that are used to deter nuisance birds is provided at AT-2.

 

Research indicates that it is common in addressing these locations, such as at the Plaza, that a number of different controls (spikes, gels, ultrasonic devices, kites, electrical impulse strips and wires) in combination may be required to address this situation. In addition a community education program would also be proposed to address the issue of feeding birds and the correct method of storing and disposing of leftover / waste food in and around shops in the locality.

 

Financial Impact

 

This project hasn’t been included in the 2015 / 16 Budget and based on the size and scale of the equipment and likely pest control services required be effective, a budget allocation of up to $20,000 would be required to engage a pest controller and the purchase of the deterrent devices.

 

Conclusion

 

The impact of bird nuisances such as those currently being experienced in and around the Plaza, have a direct impact on the amenity and enjoyment of this community meeting place, and on the operations of local businesses, and for the comfort, convenience and vitality  of the Plaza, bird control measures be explored.

 

The research that has been undertaken, including the attached report from Dubbo City Council, highlights that eradication of nuisance birds from public areas requires an ongoing and varied short as well as long term solutions. The strategy requires an understanding of the lifecycle of the bird species that are causing a nuisance and an ongoing refinement and vigilance of adaptive behaviors is required for long term success.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:-

1.   Council engage a specialised pest controller to develop a bird management plan;

2.   A budget of $20,000 be allocated in the next quarterly budget review to implement the bird management plan; and

3.   A quarterly report on the progress and effectiveness of the bird management plan be provided to Council.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Dubbo City Council - Main Street Study - Impact & Management of Starlings

28 Pages

 

AT‑2 View

Examples of Pest Control Methods for Nuisance Birds

3 Pages

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2015

June 2015 Traffic Committee

 

 

Subject:          June 2015 Traffic Committee    

Record No:     SU1326 - 36844/15

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):       Sashika Young 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

 

The Lane Cove Traffic Committee Meeting was held on Tuesday, 16 June 2015.  The Agenda is included as AT-1.  The Traffic Committee recommendations are shown in the Minutes of the Meeting, included as AT-2.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council adopt the recommendations of the Lane Cove Traffic Committee meeting held on Tuesday, 16 June 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

AGENDA - Traffic Committee - June 2015

16 Pages

AT‑2 View

MINUTES - Traffic Committee - June 2015

8 Pages

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2015

Local Government Conference NSW 2015

 

 

Subject:          Local Government Conference NSW 2015    

Record No:     SU1915 - 38119/15

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):       Kirsty Beram 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council has received correspondence from Local Government NSW concerning their Annual Conference.  In preparation for the Conference, Local Government NSW have asked all councils to consider the key issues affecting its community.  These issues will be discussed and debated during the business sessions of the Conference.  This report recommends that Council give consideration to its top 3-5 issues and endorse the delegates including the four (4) voting delegates for the Conference.

 

Discussion

The Annual Conference of Local Government NSW (LGNSW) will be held from 11 to 13 October 2015 at the Rosehill Gardens Racecourse, Rosehill NSW

 

A Draft Program for the Conference is shown attached as AT-1.  Councils have been requested to identify issues or motions relating to the following overall categories:-

 

·    Industrial Relations & Employment

Industrial relations and employment related legislation; industrial awards and rates of pay; WHS and workers compensation compliance; human resources policy, practice and benchmarking; workforce planning and development; staff and councillor training and development; skills shortages; staff attraction, retention and productivity; employment security; workplace change; Code of Conduct; leadership and management capacity; capability framework and council governance.

 

·    Economic

Own source revenue (e.g. rates, fees, charges etc.); intergovernmental fiscal relations (e.g. grants, cost shifting etc.); financial management and governance including long term financial planning and asset management; financial sustainability; economic policy affecting Local Government; local and regional economic development (including tourism); transport (e.g. roads, bridges, airports, pedestrian and cycle facilities, rail); Local Water Utilities; stormwater and floodplain infrastructure; other infrastructure and disaster management and recovery.

 

·    Environmental

Land use planning (including environmental, heritage conservation and development planning); ecologically sustainable development; waste management in accordance with the waste hierarchy and extended producer responsibility; natural resource management; protection of local, regional and state natural environments including air quality, rivers and waterways and biodiversity, biosecurity and weeds management; pollution prevention including energy consumption and soil contamination; environmental risk management through reduction of hazards and pollutants and remediation/rehabilitation of degraded environments; climate change mitigation and adaptation; and responsible resource consumption and conservation.


·      Governance / Civic Leadership

Local Government legislative and regulatory settings (e.g. Australian and/or NSW Constitutional recognition; Local Government Act review); corporate governance (e.g. role differentiation for Mayors, Councillors, General Managers and senior staff; Codes of Conduct; Political donations); structural reform (e.g. amalgamations and/or boundary changes; shared resources and services); Local Government elections (e.g. financial impact of electoral reforms on councils; impact of electoral reforms); participation (e.g. women’s participation rates as councillors; cultural diversity in leadership; other opportunities for citizens to genuinely participate in council processes); and policies and programs of other spheres of government that impact on Local Government governance or citizen involvement in local democracy.

 

·      Social Policy

Social planning, social impact assessment, access, equity and social justice; community development and community cultural development; community halls and neighbourhood centres, ageing and disability services, women’s services, youth services and children’s care and education services); issues of concern and interest to NSW Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples; cultural services (performing and visual arts, art galleries, performing arts centres, museums, public art, community arts, festivals, celebrations, heritage, new media and digital arts); Libraries; Health services (regulatory activities reducing public health risks; promoting healthy lifestyles; immunisation, early childhood health centres or rural medical services); Recreation facilities and services; and crime prevention planning.

 

The following issues have been identified by staff as Council’s key issues:-

 

Fit for the Future Reform Agenda

 

In the Independent Panel’s Final Report (ILGRP), ‘Revitalising Local Government’ the Panel considered and recommended Joint Organisations as an option for all NSW Local Government Authorities.  The key objectives of the Panel in this review were to:-

·    Create high capacity Councils providing better services to their community’s and being equal partners with State and Federal agencies;

·    Allow for more equitable pattern of development across the metropolitan area taking into account planned development;

·    Underpin Sydney status as a global city; and

·    Support the implementation of the Metropolitan Strategy, especially planning major centres and sub-regional delivery plans.

 

In the ILGRP’s recommendation No. 43 as detailed on Page 103 of their report, it stated:-

‘Pending any further action on mergers, establish Joint Organisations of Councils for the purposes of strategic sub-regional planning’;

However when the Minister for Local Government launched the Government’s ‘Fit for the Future’ reform initiative in September 2014, Joint Organisations were not an option for metropolitan Sydney and only applied to Regional NSW.

 

It is proposed to put forward a Motion jointly with the City of Ryde and Hunters Hill councils that calls upon the Premier of NSW, The Hon. Mike Baird, and the Minister for Local Government, The Hon. Paul Toole, to allow the one set of rules to equally apply to all Local Government in NSW and allow Joint Regional Organisations (JRA’s) to be an option in the Sydney metropolitan area, in addition to rural and regional NSW.

 

Further it is proposed that the following supporting information be submitted with the motion:-

 

The JRA Model proposed by the Councils of Lane Cove, Ryde and Hunters Hill is:-

·    Fit for purpose;

·    A more functional and integrated approach to inter-government relations;

·    Well positioned to provide strategic decision making, service delivery and advocacy; and

·    An option that avoids the huge cost of amalgamations.

 

From our research and studies, mergers present;

·    No evidence that forced mergers result in cost savings;

·    That a ‘one size fits all approach’ of mergers is misplaced;

·    Empirical evidence of the 2000-2004 NSW Council mergers, shows no difference in performance between merged and unmerged Councils;

·    Empirical evidence of the 2008 Queensland amalgamations shows that most amalgamated Councils are operating under diseconomies of scale;

·    The proposed mergers do not represent ‘a common community of interest’;

·    Local representations severely diminished; and

·    A loss of ‘local’ in Local Government.

 

This motion highlights the benefits of Council’s proposed Joint Regional Authority (JRA) option for northern Sydney and it being a superior option over mergers, thereby enhancing the Local Government sector.  It reinforces the recommendations of the ILGRP and the importance of the option of Joint Organisations being available as an option for all Sydney metropolitan Councils. 

 

Conclusion

 

In view of the above issues, it will therefore be recommended that Council give consideration to its 3-5 top issues affecting the Lane Cove Community and refer them to the Local Government NSW for inclusion on the 2015 Conference Agenda

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

1.    Give consideration to its 3-5 top issues affecting the Lane Cove community to be submitted for discussion at the Local Government NSW Annual Conference on 11-13 October 2015;

2.    Submit to the conference the proposed joint motion with Hunters Hill and City of Ryde councils as outlined in the report, in respect of seeking the application of rules allowing Joint Organisations to be an option for metropolitan Sydney as well as rural and regional NSW councils; and

3.    Authorise delegates to attend the Conference including Council’s four (4) voting delegates

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Local Government NSW Annual Conference - Draft Program 2015

3 Pages

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2015

LEP Review 2015

 

 

Subject:          LEP Review 2015    

Record No:     SU5918 - 38975/15

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):       Stephanie Bashford 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report relates to a planning proposal to amend the Local Environmental Plan 2009 as a routine review to update the LEP in regard to miscellaneous planning and development issues, in accordance with the Environmental Planning & Assessment Act 1979.  The amendments relate to such matters as zone boundaries, road reservations, heritage listing reviews, editing of text and mapping historical anomalies, alignment of floor space and height controls and other matters.  Council is recommended to approve the LEP Review 2015 Schedule attached at AT-1 for submission to the Department of Planning and Environment‘s LEP Gateway with a request for public exhibition.

 

Background

 

Local Environmental Plan 2009 was produced in accordance with the NSW Standard LEP template issued by the State Government in 2006. It was a comprehensive LEP, that is, it provided significant rezonings to incorporate the residential and employment targets set under the Metropolitan Strategy for Sydney and Inner North Subregional Strategy.

 

The LEP 2009 was gazetted on 19 February 2010. A 12 month review was undertaken as required by Departmental policy, resulting in a series of amendments being gazetted, including those in response to an open space review and the addition of around 20 heritage sites.  Including planning proposals initiated by private applicants, approximately 20 amending LEPs have been gazetted since 2010, generally relating to major site-specific issues such as the Mowbray Precinct.  Relevant legislation includes Division 4 of the Environmental Planning & Assessment Act 1979, Section 5.10 of the LEP 2009 LEP Schedule 5: Environmental Heritage and the Lane Cove Heritage Register.

 

Discussion

 

In the five (5) years since the LEP’s introduction a range of relatively minor issues have arisen in the course of strategic planning, development applications, the recent heritage photographic study and other Council projects.

 

Zone Boundaries

An optional Standard LEP clause (5.3) allows development near zone boundaries to be done as though the adjacent zone land uses applied, in some circumstances:-

·    The aim is to provide flexibility where an investigation reveals that a use allowed on the other side of a zone boundary would enable a more logical and appropriate development of the site and be compatible with the planning objectives and land uses for the adjoining zone.

·    This cannot apply where the adjacent zone is RE1 Public Recreation or E2 Environmental Conservation, or the land is within a coastal zone, or the purpose is sex services or restricted premises.

·    A distance from the zone boundary would be specified for exhibition, such as 20 metres.

 


Road Reservation

 

The Development Control Plan accompanying LEP 2009 provided a 3 metre building setback from the eastern boundary of Cox’s Lane to highlight to potential property developers that a road acquisition for road-widening of the lane may be undertaken by Council at a future date. This provision is proposed to be strengthened by its identification as a land reservation acquisition layer in the LEP, allowing the appropriate mechanism to be furthered investigated to achieve this objective. The configuration is also to be extended to Epping Road.

 

Height of Buildings

 

A recent decision by the JRPP indicated that the height objectives in Lane Cove’s LEP are unnecessarily constraining to developments that would, in practice, have less impact. For example, a clause 4.6 objection to seek a variation above the height standard, where a taller, slimmer building would produce a shadow impact for a shorter time although over more dwellings, this has not been supported on the grounds that the current objective is to “minimize” shadowing. It is proposed to amend the objective to avoid this situation, while still emphasizing the importance of controlling overshadowing.

 

Subdivision of Semi-Detached Houses

 

“Semis” refer to attached houses generally built some decades before the current planning controls were introduced. They would now be equivalent to “attached dual occupancies”, but, as below, the subdivision of dual occupancies is not permitted. This has created a difficulty for owners wishing to sell a semi that they bought prior to dual occupancies being introduced by the State Government in the 1990s. It is proposed that such properties should be able to be subdivided.

 

Subdivision of Dual Occupancies

 

Dual occupancies have not been permitted to be subdivided since May 1996, as their dual frontages, double garages were dominating the streetscape and detached dual occupancies in significant numbers by property developers were impacting on the orderly, leafy character of rear gardens, although they are useful as an alternative for joint households.

 

However, where a dual occupancy is developed on a property that has dual road access, there are no rear gardens adjoining and the streetscape issue does not arise. Such a subdivision appears to have minor visual impact and to  be supportable, subject to merits as for any DA.

 

A clause also is to be introduced, as done in other councils’ LEPs, to clarify that subdivision of dual occupancies is not permissible. This is currently the legal position but is not clearly expressed in the Standard LEP and has caused frequent inquiries to the DA staff.

 

Heritage

 

Several of the proposed amendments relate to heritage. A number of these result from the recent Heritage Photographic Study completed for Council by Sue Rosen, heritage consultant. That study updated the photographs of all of Lane Cove’s built heritage items, some of which had been substantially altered or demolished since the LEP Register was introduced in 1995 following a heritage study prepared in the late 1980s. 

 

In the course of that study, Sue Rosen identified a series of properties which may be suitable either for updating of their text listing or for deletion, but it was not within the brief for that study to undertake the full assessment. Additional requests for deletion relate to recent development approvals for demolition and new construction, based on heritage studies already undertaken by Council’s heritage consultants. One item has been requested by the owner to be considered for addition, and this will be subject to an independent assessment.

 

Miscellaneous

 

A range of other potential amendments relate, for example, to prohibition of serviced apartments in mixed use zones, vehicle repairs to be permissible in the industrial area, acid sulfate soils provisions wording and other matters.

 

Process

 

The Department’s policy is that such “housekeeping” matters should be compiled and submitted together in one single planning proposal. It is therefore proposed to undertake this as follows:-

(i)   Council  approves the LEP Review 2015 Schedule at this meeting; and

(ii)  Staff would then prepare and submit Planning Proposal 24 - LEP Review 2015 to the Department of Planning & Environment seeking consent to proceed to public exhibition.

 

In relation to the proposed heritage amendments, the process is that Council would commission a heritage consultant to assess the heritage value of each site. Their report would be submitted to the NSW Office of Environment & Heritage if appropriate to the issues and site, at the time when the planning proposal is sent to the Department of Planning.

 

Community Consultation

 

Statement of Intent

 

The consultation is designed to seek public comment on miscellaneous issues in a planning proposal to review LEP 2009.  Any comments received will be reviewed and evaluated to determine whether or not to proceed with each issue individually. The consultation would occur upon Gateway approval being granted for exhibition of the draft LEP.

 

Method

 

Level of Participation

Inform

Inform

Consult

Form of Participation

Open

Targeted

Open

Target Audience

Lane Cove Community and community groups

Relevant property owners.

Lane Cove Community

Proposed Medium

Advertisement and

eNewsletter

Notification Letters

Public Exhibition,

Website Exhibition.

Indicative Timing

8 weeks

8 weeks

8 weeks

 

Conclusion

 

It is appropriate to undertake a review of LEP 2009 to update it in terms of issues identified by consultants, members of the public and staff in the years since its introduction.  A schedule of proposed LEP amendments is provided for Council’s approval.  Council is requested to approve the preparation of Planning Proposal 24 accordingly for submission to the Department’s LEP Gateway.


 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council:-

1.   Approve the submission to the Department of Planning & Environment of a planning proposal in accordance with the LEP Review 2015 Schedule at AT-1, seeking consent to proceed to public exhibition;

2.   Request delegation for the General Manager for the planning proposal; and

3.   Prepare a draft Development Control Plan as relevant to the LEP amendments for submission to Council.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

LEP Review 2015 Schedule

4 Pages

 

 

  


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2015

Little Lane Car Park Progress Update

 

 

Subject:          Little Lane Car Park Progress Update    

Record No:     SU5484 - 40320/15

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):       John  Lee 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This is an interim status report in respect of the Little Lane Car Park redevelopment project.  As this is the author’s last report as Director Major Projects, the report also takes a look back to the projects’ conception.

 

A Look Back

 

In 2005 Councillors considered a paper by the then General Manager, Peter Brown entitled “A Plan for Facilities into the Future” setting out options to deliver community facilities by value adding underutilised properties.

 

The Director Major Projects position was established in the General Managers Unit to progress the options available to Council.  The Major Projects Strategic Management Plan 2007-2106 set out a number of projects which except for a potential redevelopment of the Lane Cove West Bowling and Recreation Club, the projects have either been completed, are under construction or are under active planning.

 

The Major Projects Plan proposed offsetting the cost of additional car parking on the Little Lane Car Park site and additional community facilities with projected net project revenue from the development in excess of $3m (2007) or $3.75m CPI adjusted.

 

After development consent was issued in November 2012, expressions of interest and tendering, , Council entered into a project delivery agreement with WN Developments Pty Ltd, a special purpose vehicle of EDG Capital Group in June 2014 to undertake the project development including detailed design construction and marketing of the residential units.

 

WN Developments Pty Ltd engaged Woods Bagot to refine the project and obtained a S96 approval to increase the number of units to 58, with minor reconfiguration of the building footprint.

 

Work commenced on site in August 2014 for service adjustments with excavation commencing in September 2014, involving a deep open excavation to approximately 15m below Little Lane.  Excavation works were completed mid March 2015, allowing for the construction of the car park structure to begin.

 

Current Situation

 

At the date of this report, all of the car park levels have been constructed and fit-out of services, lighting and painting has commenced.  The lower ground floor of the community facility has been poured and formwork and reinforcement for the first half of the ground floor level is near complete (see page 16 of AT-1).  As with all levels, given their size, the concrete slabs have been poured in 2 halves. The entire ground floor is expected to be poured by the end of July.  The construction of the residential units above the ground floor will continue while the car park and community and retail spaces are being completed.

 

To ensure that the community facility meets the needs of the intended tenants, Smith and Tzannes, architects, have been engaged to plan the various areas to ensure that penetrations for services are correctly located.

 

Expected Timetable

 

Subject to no extended periods of wet weather affecting the construction program, it is expected that the public car park will be commissioned and reopened for public use before November 2015, with the community facility fit-out and retail completed by January 2015 and the residential units by August 2016.

 

For safety reasons the Developer has requested that the overbridge over Little Street linking the development with the Aquatic Centre be delayed until the community facility is completed.

 

Sales

 

The sales marketing campaign for the building named “Ivory” commenced with the opening of a sales office on Longueville Road in May 2015.  At the date of this report, sales contracts have been executed for 47 of the 58 residential units in the development with gross sales revenue now expected to exceed $60 million.

 

Under the Project Delivery Agreement Council is entitled to a share of additional sales revenue in excess of $45 million taking into account GST, S96 contributions and additional construction / fit-out costs.   Once all sales are completed and a limited number of variations accounted for, the final benefit to Council will be determined.

 

Photographs

 

A historical snapshot of the project since the project delivery agreement was signed on 20 June 2014 until the present time, with the final picture an artist’s impression prepared by architect Woods Bagot of the completed development looking along the Little Lane façade is attached as AT-1.

 

Footnote

 

As this is my last report to Council in my capacity of Director Major Projects, it has been my pleasure to be involved in this project from its conception delivering for Council and this community the additional parking, community and retail spaces whilst returning a significant return toward other community facilities identified in the Major Projects Plan.  I take this opportunity of thanking the Council for their support.

 

I would also like to acknowledge the manner in which WN Developments c/- EDG Capital Group and their contactors Absolute Contracting (for the excavation phase) and Trinity Constructions (for the remainder building contract) have undertaken the project to date.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Little Lane Car Park Redevelopment Historical Snapshot

17 Pages

 

 

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2015

Centennial Ave/ Barwon Rd/ Fig Tree St Intersection Safety Analysis

 

 

Subject:          Centennial Ave/ Barwon Rd/ Fig Tree St Intersection Safety Analysis     

Record No:     SU5851 - 39893/15

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):       Abdullah Uddin 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report outlines a traffic, pedestrian and cyclist safety assessment of the Centennial Avenue / Barwon Road / Fig Tree Street intersection, Lane Cove. The assessment followed an accident at the location in May 2015. It is recommended the report be received and noted.

 

Background

 

Council at its meeting of 18 May 2015 considered a Matter Arising “Examination of Safety at Intersection of Centennial Avenue and Barwon Road, Lane Cove West” and resolved:-

 

“That the Traffic Committee and the RMS re-examines the safety of the intersection of Centennial Avenue and Barwon Road/Figtree Street, Lane Cove West with respect to pedestrian crossings and the installation of vehicle turning lights.”

 

Discussion.

 

Site Analysis

 

The following observations are noted in relation to the intersection:-

·    The sight distance from Centennial Ave to Barwon Rd was appropriate. There were some overgrown vegetation at the corner property on the northern side of Centennial Avenue (between Barwon Rd and Currawong Ave) which needs to be pruned, however, this vegetation is unlikely to have any contribution to the crash (refer to Photograph 1).

·    No cyclist or pedestrian crossed Barwon Rd at this intersection between 8-8.30am and there was minimum number of left turning vehicles from Centennial Ave to Barwon Rd.

·    The intersection was observed to be free flowing, except for a minor eastbound queue on Centennial Ave. However, vehicles were able to clear the stop line within the allocated green time for the west approach.

·    The existing signposting and line marking at this intersection appeared to be appropriate. The existing ELP and signal lantern are in close proximity at the north-west corner, however, the visibility for eastbound traffic in Centennial Ave was considered to be appropriate.

 

Photograph 1: View of Barwon Rd from Centennial Ave

IMG_20150622_081209.jpg

Looking West

IMG_20150622_081415.jpg

Looking East

 

Intersection Count

 

Council arranged an intersection count on Wednesday, 24 June 2015 (non-school holiday period). The key points are summarised below:-

·    There were only 18 left turning vehicles from Centennial Ave to Barwon Rd during the peak operation of the intersection (7.30-8.30am);

·    At the same time, only five (5) pedestrians crossed Barwon Rd at this intersection; and

·    During the pm peak (4.45-5.45pm), the left turning vehicles from Centennial Ave to Barwon Rd was 55, however, only four (4) pedestrians crossed Barwon Rd during this time.

 

Figtree

Centennial

 

Crash Data Analysis

 

The RMS crash data has been analysed at this intersection between the period 1 July 2009 and 30 June 2014 (Refer to Figure 1). The key points are:-

·    There were no pedestrian related crashes in Barwon Rd;

·    There was only one bike related crash over the last five (5) years; and

·    There were three ‘rear end’ crashes in Centennial Ave. The remaining four crashes involved vehicles entering from side streets.

 

The above crash data does not justify any pedestrian safety measure at this intersection.

 

CrashDiagramCentennialBarwonFigTree.jpg

Figure 1: RMS Crash Diagram at Centennial Ave / Barwon Rd / Fig Tree St

 

Conclusion

 

Based on the site observations, intersection count and crash history analysis, the intersection does not warrant any immediate traffic safety measures. Instruction has been sent to Council’s crews to prune the overgrown vegetation at the north-west corner of this intersection. Whilst the crash involving a school child is noted, it appears to be due to the fault of the road user. However, Council will continue to monitor the intersection and a further report will be prepared if additional crashes at this intersection are documented in the RMS upcoming crash reports.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2015

Public Exibition by NSW Environment Protection Authority of Protection of the Environment Operations (Clean Air) Amendment (Cruise Ships) Regulation

 

 

Subject:          Public Exibition by NSW Environment Protection Authority of Protection of the Environment Operations (Clean Air) Amendment (Cruise Ships) Regulation    

Record No:     SU1171 - 36257/15

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):       David Wilson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The Sydney Ports Authority recently stated that with the demand for holiday cruises increasing, so too are the number of cruise ship visits to Sydney.  The number of ships visiting Sydney close to tripled over the past five (5) years, from 119 in 2009/10 to more than 280 scheduled for 2014/15, with a peak of 114 ship visits over the three (3) months from January to March 2015.

As a result of the cruise ship demand to use Sydney Harbour, concerns regarding the impacts on air quality have been raised and have resulted in the NSW Government placing on exhibition the Protection of the Environment Operations (Clean Air) Amendment (Cruise Ships) Regulation. The Regulation is aimed at controlling the air emissions from cruise ships berthed in Sydney Harbour, and to ensure that air quality in this area is of a standard that ensures that public and environmental health are maintained.

 

The Regulation has been issued following ongoing community concern regarding the emissions from cruise ships, docked in Sydney Harbour and using ships generators to power on board services. The fuel oil that is used for the on board generators is high in sulphur and can result in air emissions that is both offensive and potentially harmful to health.

 

Council has made a submission in support of the proposed amendments to the Protection of the Environment Operations Act, and has also requested that the Regulation be revised to include larger non cruise ships and tankers that dock at the Gore Bay Terminal operated by Viva (formerly Shell Australia), to ensure that the same air emission standards apply to all commercial ships using Sydney Harbour.

 

Background

 

On 2 June 2015 the NSW parliament released a consultation draft of new regulations which will mandate the use of low sulphur fuel (0.1% or less) by all cruise ships berthing in Sydney Harbour after 1 October 2015 and in all NSW ports after 1 July 2016.

The requirement for all cruise ships to use low sulphur fuel in Sydney Harbour from 1 October 2015 will apply to the Overseas Passenger Terminal at Darling Harbour and the White Bay Cruise Terminal, Sydney’s two (2) main cruise terminals.

The draft regulations introduce an offence if any of the engines of a ship use fuel other than low sulphur fuel during berthing operations, for which the Master and Owner are held liable and may be penalised up to $22,000 in the case of the Master and $44,000 in the case of Owners. Limited exemptions to the use of low sulphur fuel are provided; however, they do not accommodate ordinary commercial operational constraints and will only apply in exceptional and unexpected circumstances.

Obligations are also imposed on vessel Owners in relation to keeping log books and other records relating to the use of fuel within the regulated ports. The regulations also provide that the relevant authority can approve alternative methods for cruise ships to achieve low sulphur emissions, other than the use of low sulphur fuel. Such methods may include the use of scrubber technology and similar measures, although there has not yet been any confirmation on this or any draft approved methods released.

Discussion.

 

The proposed regulations have been introduced following ongoing concerns of local residents of the White Bay Cruise Terminal in relation to noise and air pollution arising from the relocation of part of Sydney’s overseas cruise passenger operations to White Bay some years ago.

The relevant authority for regulating air pollution at White Bay is the NSW Environmental Protection Authority (EPA). After a detailed study and consultation process, calls were made for the EPA to introduce new environmental licensing requirements in relation to air and noise pollution for NSW cruise shipping terminals, possibly mandating standards even lower than those internationally accepted under MARPOL
(International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships).

 

Submissions made by industry appear to have resulted in the adoption of MARPOL standards in line with international practice, but calls to await the implementation of the new MARPOL standards internationally have been outweighed by the concerns of local residents in the White Bay area.

In response to these concerns, on 27 May 2015 the Port Authority of NSW issued a direction suspending all overnight cruise ship berthing at the White Bay Cruise Terminal, until the EPA implements its new regulations in relation to the use of low sulphur fuel in NSW.

Council has reviewed the Regulation, and lodged a submission that due to the proximity of the Gore Bay Terminal to nearby residences in Greenwich; the ships such as fuel tankers that berth at this location have the potential to also cause unnecessary air emissions and noise nuisances, and as such the Regulation should be expanded to include a wider class of ship that are typical of the tankers that service the Gore Bay Terminal.

Whilst the Regulation is primarily focused on the use of low sulphur fuels and air quality impacts from berthed vessels, the use of on board generators rather than ship to shore power is also considered as an appropriate issue for inclusion in this review of legislation governing ships on Sydney Harbour. As such it has been requested that that the Regulation be amended to include the use of low sulphur fuels and also require all tanker type commercial vessels, be required to use ship to shore power when berthed. It is proposed that these amendments be applied to all tanker type commercial vessels that use Sydney Harbour from 1 October 2015, and not be restricted just to cruise ships.

 

Conclusion

 

As discussed, Council has received representations from the community in regards to the Regulation and has made a submission in support of the proposed amendments to the Protection of the Environment Operations Act, and has also requested that the Regulation be revised to include larger non cruise ships and tankers that dock at the Gore Bay Terminal operated by Viva (formerly Shell Australia).

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2015

Waste Management - Mission Australia - Soft Landing - Mattress Collection and Recycling System

 

 

Subject:          Waste Management - Mission Australia - Soft Landing - Mattress Collection and Recycling System     

Record No:     SU5723 - 37939/15

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):       David Wilson 

 

 

Executive Summary

As part of the NSW Government’s commitment to assisting Council’s in identifying, collecting and processing of ‘problem wastes’, Council has allocated $130,000 of the EPA’s Better Waste Recycling Fund to a kerbside mattress collection program that will fund the service for the  next two (2) years (2015/16 - 2016/17). During this period, Council will monitor and evaluate the program and the impact on our overall landfill diversion rate.

 

Mission Australia was recently selected to provide this service on behalf of Council. Mission Australia’s Soft Landing mattress collection program, exemplifies sustainability, in that it provides a cost effective solution for managing this waste, and an environmental benefit from reducing the volume of waste being directed to land fill. The program presents not just a positive economic model, in that Council will reduce its overall costs for the disposal of waste, but the partnership with Mission Australia represents a significant social benefit to the community.

 

This project is an example of our waste services team finding ways to reduce waste, participate in social programs and identifying grant funding opportunities with innovative programs. Their efforts are commendable and enthusiastically supported.

 

Discussion

Council’s commitment to improving our waste management services and increasing our reuse of recyclable materials can be highlighted in recent changes to our waste collection services, including the wheelie bin green waste service (October 2014) that has resulted in a diversion rate increasing up to 50% over the past few months, an online Compost Revolution campaign as well as the e-waste collection days conducted in March and again in September 2015, just to highlight a few.

 

Achieving increased waste diversion rates require constant review of what is presented for collection, and implementation of programs to address particular ‘problem wastes’ such as chemicals and paints, e-waste and mattresses need to be constantly reviewed and revised.

As part of the NSW Government’s commitment to assisting Council’s in identifying, collecting and processing of ‘problem wastes’, Council has allocated $130,000 of the EPA’s Better Waste Recycling Fund (BWRF) to the kerbside mattress collection program that will fund the this service for the  next two (2) years (2015/16 - 2016/17). During this period, Council will monitor and evaluate the program on our overall landfill diversion rate.

 

This new service will commence in July 2015, and will be integrated into Council’s existing general household clean up service, with mattresses being identified when residents book their household/bulky items collection. Our service provider for the collection of mattresses is Mission Australia (see http://www.softlanding.com.au/index.html), who will work directly with our domestic waste collection contractor URM, to ensure used and unwanted mattresses are separated from the general waste stream and recycled rather than going into landfill. 

 

Mission Australia’s Soft Landing Program is also a social enterprise initiative that employs the long term unemployed which provides workplace opportunities, work skills, on the job training and formal qualifications. Whilst Mission Australia provides these opportunities to those most in need in the community, the delivery of this service also needs to be economically viable. The grant funding of $130,000 for two (2) years will cover the annual costs in the delivery of this service and in the long term, will provide Council with a saving on its overall waste disposal costs.

 

Environmental Impact

It is estimated that 80% - 90% of the materials from used mattresses are able to be processed and reused in various products including ;carpet underlay, commercial mulch, particle board and filling for punching bags. The recycling of mattresses also has a significant impact on the volume of waste being diverted away from land filling.

 

Financial Impact

The current waste disposal costs for land filling is $320 per tonne and any increase in recycling or reuse of ‘waste’ materials has a direct impact on reducing our waste disposal costs. Council has received this grant funding for the project for up to 2500 – 3000 mattresses per year, the grant will cover the cost of the collection and processing of the mattresses at a cost of $22.50 per mattress, as opposed to the cost of current disposal cost of $50 per mattress. As such the new mattress service will result in a net overall reduction in disposal costs, whilst increasing our overall diversion rate.

 

It is envisaged that with a steady increase in population in the locality over the coming years, there would be an incremental increase in the number of mattresses being presented for disposal and following on from this 2 year grant funded project, Council will incorporate this program into our overall waste management processes as a result of the savings presented through this project.

 

Conclusion

The Mission Australia Soft Landing mattress collection program, exemplifies sustainability, in that it provides an environmental advantage and benefit from reducing the volume of waste that would otherwise be directed to land fill. The program presents a positive economic model by reducing our costs for the disposal of waste by using this system.

 

In addition the partnership with Mission Australia has a significant social benefit for the long term unemployed to gain work skills and work experience.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2015

Residential Development Activity Statistics

 

 

Subject:          Residential Development Activity Statistics    

Record No:     SU1441 - 39709/15

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):       Craig Wrightson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The report outlines the residential development activity and residential LEP capacity for the Lane Cove Local Government Area. It is recommended the report be received and noted.

 

Background

 

Council at its meeting of 15 June, 2015 when considering a report “Update on Plan for Growing Sydney - NSW Metro Strategy”, resolved in part:-

 

A further report be received outlining the number of developments Council has approved under the LEP 2009 and those pending Planning Proposals.”

 

Discussion.

 

The capacity within the current LEP is approximately 4.300 dwellings. To date Council has approved 2643 units and applications for 1079 units are currently with Council for assessment, a total of 3722 units. The approved units are in the following precincts, 392 Burns Bay, 467 Finlayson/Birdwood, 1087 Mowbray, 907 St Leonards and 793 in other areas. In terms of the status of the approvals, 816 units have been completed, while 1358 are under construction, the remaining are pending.

 

Council has approved three planning proposals all related to Council’s vision to stimulate St Leonards and improve the urban domain. These have added approximately 1550 units, bringing the total new dwelling capacity within the LEP to approximately 5850 units.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


 

Ordinary Council Meeting 20 July 2015

Council Snapshot

 

 

Subject:          Council Snapshot    

Record No:     SU220 - 38389/15

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):       Craig Wrightson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Attached for the information of Councillors is a review of Council’s recent activities, entitled Council Snapshot.  This report provides a summary of the operations of each Division.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the report be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Council Snapshot July 2015

46 Pages

 

 

          

 



[1] NSROC Regional Ageing Priorities “Towards a Regional Strategy on Ageing” McFee, G, Nov 2013

[2] Lane Cove Seniors Social Plan 2010-2014, pp 21

[3] Lane Cove Social Plan 2010-2014, pp75