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Agenda

Ordinary Council Meeting

18 August 2014

The meeting commences at 6.30pm. If members of the public are

not interested in any business recommended to be considered in

Closed Session or there is no such business, Council will ordinarily

  commence consideration of all other business at 7pm.

 


 

Notice of Meeting

 

Dear Councillors

 

Notice is given of the Ordinary Council Meeting, to be held in the Council Chambers, 48 Longueville Road Lane Cove on Monday 18 August 2014 commencing at 7:00pm. The business to be transacted at the meeting is included in this business paper.

 

Yours faithfully

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

 

Council Meeting Procedures

 

The Council meeting is chaired by the Mayor, Councillor David Brooks-Horn. Councillors are entitled to one vote on a matter. If votes are equal, the Chairperson has a second or casting vote. When a majority of Councillors vote in favour of a Motion it becomes a decision of the Council. Minutes of Council and Committee meetings are published on Council’s website www.lanecove.nsw.gov.au by 5pm on the Thursday following the meeting.

 

The Meeting is conducted in accordance with Council's Code of Meeting Practice. The order of business is listed in the Agenda on the next page. That order will be followed unless Council resolves to modify the order at the meeting. This may occur for example where the members of the public in attendance are interested in specific items on the agenda.

 

Members of the public may address the Council Meeting on any issue for a maximum of 3 minutes during the public forum which is held at the beginning of the meeting. All persons addressing the Meeting must speak to the Chair. Speakers and Councillors will not enter into general debate or ask questions.

 

If you do not understand any part of the information given above; require assistance to participate in the meeting due to a disability; or wish to obtain information in relation to Council, please contact Council’s Manager Governance on 99113525.

 

Please note meetings held in the Council Chambers are recorded on tape for the purposes of verifying the accuracy of minutes and the tapes are not disclosed to any third party under the Government Information (Public Access)  Act 2009, except as allowed under section 18(1) or section 19(1) of the PPIP Act, or where Council is compelled to do so by court order, warrant or subpoena or by any other legislation.

 

 

 


Ordinary Council 18 August 2014

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

APOLOGIES

 

OPENING OF MEETING WITH PRAYER

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT TO COUNTRY

 

NOTICE OF WEBCASTING OF MEETING

 

public forum

 

Members of the public may address the Council Meeting on any issue for 3 minutes.

 

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

 

1.      ORDINARY COUNCIL MEETING - 21 JULY 2014

 

 

Orders Of The Day

 

Notices of Motion

 

2.       Waste Management

 

3.       Careers Day Indigenous Student

 

4.       Moon Festival

 

5.       Delvena Women's Refuge

 

6.       Changes to Rosenthal Carpark Restrictions

 

Officer Reports for Determination

 

7.       Draft Street Tree Master Plan

 

8.       Henley Street School Day Parking Restrictions

 

9.       8-14 Mindarie Street: Options

 

10.     St Leonards Public Domain Master Plan

 

11.     Tender Negotiations for Construction of Recreational Community Facility (Scout Hall and Amenities Block) At Blackman Park

 

12.     Lane Cove Council Meets the Neighbours Events

 

13.     Revised Naming of New Road, and New Park at Burns Bay Road Precinct

 

14.     Events on the Lane Cove and Parramatta River Foreshore

 

15.     Local Government Conference NSW 2014

 

16.     Tender for Miscellaneous Trade and General Services - Civil Works, Open Space Services and Traffic Services

 

17.     Local Traffic Committee Meeting held on 15 July 2014

 

18.     Timebanking Volunteer Program

 

19.     Endorsement of the Local Government NSW Approach to Support the Continued Funding of Aged and Disability Officer Positions

 

Officer Reports for Information

 

20.     Street Parties in Lane Cove

 

21.     4th Quarter Review of the 2013-14 Delivery Program and Operational Plan

 

22.     Council Snapshot  

 

 

 

 

                  


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 August 2014

Waste Management

 

 

Subject:          Waste Management    

Record No:    SU3474 - 46219/14

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):      Councillor Scott Bennison 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

When I was Mayor, I meet with Joel Harrison who told me about his idea to create an on-line waste management system for business. I explained that in Lane Cove numerous waste companies collect waste and on some days we could have up to three difference companies collecting waste from the same area. We discussed that it could be possible to have one waste company collect waste by consolidating waste contracts for local businesses and this could also present a cost saving to our local businesses.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the General Manager consult with Joel Harrison, local businesses, landlords and provide a report back to Council on how this new waste management system works and the feasibility of implementing such a system in Lane Cove.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor Scott Bennison

Councillor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 August 2014

Careers Day Indigenous Student

 

 

Subject:          Careers Day Indigenous Student    

Record No:    SU3474 - 46220/14

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):      Councillor Scott Bennison; Councillor David Karpin 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

In 2012, Council participated in an initiative involving Indigenous students from Saint Ignatius College Riverview and local businesses.

 

This was a huge success and both the Indigenous students and local business benefited from the program.

 

Due to the success of this initiative and pursuant to Lane Cove Council ‘Principals of Co-operation’ recently signed with Saint Ignatius, Lane Cove Council has been asked to participate in another careers day to be held in November this year.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council accept this invitation and that the General Manager and/or his nominee meet with representatives of local businesses and Saint Ignatius to assist in co-ordinating this year’s careers day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor Scott Bennison

Councillor

 

 

 

Councillor David Karpin

Councillor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 August 2014

Moon Festival

 

 

Subject:          Moon Festival    

Record No:    SU3474 - 46221/14

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):      Councillor Scott Bennison 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

I have been asked by a number of local Chinese businesses and residents if Lane Cove Council would consider celebrating the Moon Festival.

 

The Mid-Autumn Festival, aka Moon Festival, is held on the 15th day of the eighth month of the Chinese and Vietnamese Calendars is the second grandest festival after the Spring Festival in China. It takes its name from the fact that it is always celebrated in the middle of the autumn season. The day is also known as the Moon Festival, as at that time of the year the moon is at its roundest and brightest.

 

Mid-Autumn Festival is an inherited custom of moon sacrificial ceremonies. The ancient Chinese observed that the movement of the moon had a close relationship with changes of the seasons and agricultural production. Hence, to express their thanks to the moon and celebrate the harvest, they offered a sacrifice to the moon on autumn days.

 

Romantically speaking, the festival is to commemorate Chang E, who in order to protect her beloved husband’s elixir, ate it herself and flew to the moon.

 

In addition to the romantic legend Chang E Flying to the Moon mentioned above, there are many other legends and stories related to this grand festival. The most well-known ones include Jade Rabbit Pounding Medicine, Wu Gang Chopping Laurel Tree, and Zhu Yuanzhang and the Moon Cake Uprising.

 

Moon cakes, the special food for the Mid-Autumn Festival Moon Cake. The Moon Cake is the special food of Mid-Autumn Festival. On that day, people sacrifice moon cakes to the moon as an offering and eat them for celebration. Moon cakes come in various flavours.

 

Consistent with Council's current delivery and operational plan, the Integration of local businesses in festivals through themed food promotion, services etc meet Council objectives.

 

This timing will usually align with the Lane Cove Cameraygal Festival which runs from August to October. It is custom for businesses and families to present moon cakes to their families.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the General Manager discuss with the Cameraygal Advisory Committee  the inclusion into their 2015 program celebration of the Chinese’s  Moon Festival.

 

 

Councillor Scott Bennison

Councillor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 August 2014

Delvena Women's Refuge

 

 

Subject:          Delvena Women's Refuge    

Record No:    SU3474 - 46222/14

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):      Councillor Scott Bennison 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Councillors would be fully aware of the vital role that the Delvena Women’s Refuge plays in the protection of women and children from domestic violence.

 

Delvena Women’s Refuge has been supported by Lane Cove Council, community groups and residents for many years.

 

Council has recently become aware of changes to the management of Delvena Women’s Refuge and I am concerned about the impact that these changes may have on providing this essential and vital service to women and children who are victims of abuse.

 

Council has also become aware that Delvena Women’s Refuge was unsuccessful in their recent funding application and I would also like to know what impact this will have on the operational activities of the refuge.

 

The Fact Sheet issued June 2014 states, The new service system will continue to focus effort on people in the community known to be most at risk of homelessness, for example, women experiencing domestic and family violence, rough sleepers, young people leaving care, people with mental health issues, and people living in unsafe conditions”.

 

Put simply, Delvena Women’s Refuge is a vital place for Women and Children to escape domestic violence and I would not like to see women and children put at risk due to changes in management or through lack of funding.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the General Manager contact Mission Australia as a matter of urgency and provide a detailed report back to Council on the future operations of Delvena Women’s Refuge at the Council Meeting in September.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor Scott Bennison

Councillor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 August 2014

Changes to Rosenthal Carpark Restrictions

 

 

Subject:          Changes to Rosenthal Carpark Restrictions    

Record No:    SU4951 - 46224/14

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):      Councillor Karola Brent 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

As Council had anticipated, parking in the Lane Cove CBD has worsened in recent months with all the private developer activity as well as Council's own development projects. With the imminent closure of 86 parking spaces in the Little Lane carpark, the situation is likely to worsen further.

 

While Council is in the process of implementing measures to improve this situation, it appears that vehicle turnover an in the CBD car parks is an issue.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.   Council receive a report as soon as possible, and no later than the September 2014 Council meeting, detailing the usage patterns for Rosenthal carpark, specifically the vehicle turnover rate; and

 

2.   Based on the report, Council adjust the parking time limits in the Rosenthal carpark to a maximum of 2 hours; and

 

3.   In addition, Council sends a letter to all developers currently or in the future working in the Lane Cove CBD requesting that their employees, contractors and consulting staff use the developers' premises for parking as soon as those premises can accommodate vehicle parking.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor Karola Brent

Councillor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

   


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 August 2014

Draft Street Tree Master Plan

 

 

Subject:          Draft Street Tree Master Plan    

Record No:    SU5032 - 44641/14

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Susan Butler; Kirsten Mawby 

 

 

Executive Summary

The Draft Street Tree Master Plan has been on public exhibition and a number of submissions have been received. At the meeting of 16 June, Council resolved to defer the matter to allow staff to further consider the use of dwarf Eucalypt species where appropriate. The use of these species in certain situations has now been taken into consideration.

Amendments have been proposed for the Draft Street Tree Master Plan that will allow for greater use of dwarf species in appropriate locations.

Background

There are nearly 12,000 street trees in the Lane Cove LGA, with around 200 different species of trees used in the 296 streets.

Street trees are important community assets that are valuable to the amenity of the local area and are an integral part of Council’s infrastructure. They are under increasing pressure from services, development impacts and the changing environment.

Council resolved at its meeting of 19 November 2012 that a Street Tree Master Plan be developed. Arterra Design Pty Ltd was engaged to prepare the Draft Street Tree Master Plan. As part of the development of the Plan, an online community survey ran from 27 March to 15 April 2013 to provide some preliminary feedback on the current street tree planting in Lane Cove and this was considered by the consultant during the preparation of the Draft Plan.

The Draft Street Tree Master Plan is intended to work as a framework to inform the on-going management of street trees, ensuring that areas replanted are in harmony with other trees and landscaping already present in those streets. It identifies plant species on a street by street basis.

The Master Plan contains the following information:-

·    An overview of the landscape character in each precinct within the LGA;

·    A description of the landscape character of each of the main road corridors in the LGA;

·    Street tree planting guidelines for the typical Lane Cove street and verge profiles;

·    A list of proposed tree species for each street in the LGA (based largely on what is currently present in those streets); and

·    Street tree data sheets with photos and detailed information for each recommended tree species.

Council resolved on 21 October 2013 to:-

1.   Adopt the Draft Street Tree Master Plan dated November 2013 for the purpose of public exhibition;

2.   Place the Draft Street Tree Master Plan on public exhibition for 9 weeks in accordance with the consultation strategy outlined in the report; and

3.   Receive a further report following the public exhibition period to consider the results of the community consultation.

Council resolved on 16 June 2014 to defer further consideration of the Plan pending further investigation by staff into the use of dwarf varieties of Eucalypt where appropriate as street trees.


Discussion

The Draft Street Tree Master Plan was placed on exhibition for a period of 9 weeks starting in December 2013 to take into account the Christmas Holiday period. The public exhibition included e-newsletter, letters to residents’ associations and an advertisement in the North Shore Times.

There were 39 survey responses received, 3 written comments from individuals and 4 written submissions from residents’ associations/community committees. A range of opinions were received, but the majority of the submissions were in support of the plan.

 


Submission

Response

General

 

Plan only covers new trees, not existing ones; does not include references to maintenance of existing trees; existing trees should be managed better; street trees are very messy and dirty and make the street look ill-cared for and encourage graffiti.

Comments noted. The focus of the plan is planting of new and replacement street trees - it is not intended to be a street tree maintenance manual.

Street Tree maintenance is ongoing with a maintenance schedule in place.

Plan seems short sighted; plan should not be too prescriptive and not allow for individual circumstances.

 

The plan is a framework to guide the future of street tree planting and so can allow for individual circumstances – the key objective is to provide the right tree for the right location.

Concerns about poor tree pruning under powerlines; need more ABC; needs long term strategy to put wires underground; diagrams 1-A and 1-B are misleading and unrealistic. 

Streets identified for priority ABC are to be done in conjunction with Ausgrid subject to available funding. Priority ABC streets are listed in 7-2.

Prefer mass planting; prefer lines of the same trees for design and aesthetics rather than the mixed species; reduce diversity but not at the expense of removing good trees; replaces hotch potch with dull; some streets should be given a theme.

The plan identifies streets with existing avenues to be strengthened; other streets have more mixed planting. The plan proposes to create a more unified and consistent theme of trees within the streets.

Species should be significantly expanded; don’t want a reduction in species; generally don’t mind quite varied plantings.

Over 200 species are currently growing as street trees. This plan identifies 57 key species to be used to gradually create a more unified and consistent tree theme.

Support for using native species; better for the environment and local wildlife; more prominence to role of street trees as linkages between reserves for wildlife; provide a walk rope/line for local wildlife to cross busy roads to reduce the large amount of road kill in Lane Cove.

See page 3-9.

An amendment has been made to the Executive Summary on page v to include role of street trees as linkages for wildlife.

Rope lines across busy roads are not part of this plan but could be considered at a later date.

Native species are scraggly and become tatty very quickly; limits designers without significant benefit; live in a metropolitan area not the bush, other varieties might provide a more attractive streetscape.

The Plan includes a mixture of native and exotic species.

Don’t use gums or angophoras; no gum trees near houses; Eucalypts are too tall and block city views and drop branches on powerlines and cause blackouts; lot of dead branches over the footpaths that are in need of scheduled lopping.

Comments are noted. Eucalyptus and Angophoras are currently a key species within the Lane Cove area and will continue to be defining species in the LGA, making up around one third of the proposed master species list.

Note that there are dwarf hybrids of some of the species proposed that could be used where deemed appropriate (e.g. Eucalyptus leucoxylon ‘Euky Dwarf’; max height 4-5m at maturity). Parent names have been used in the Master Plan because the hybrid varieties of these trees are continually changing as new hybrids are developed.

Street Tree maintenance is ongoing with a maintenance schedule in place.

No gums planted along existing foot and cycle paths; safety of cyclists and pedestrians should be first priority and infrastructure second; street trees should complement these not overshadow them; check for any future plans for cyclepaths before planting; plan needs to reflect cycling infrastructure needs.

Street Trees are an essential part of Council’s infrastructure assets. Locating infrastructure requires individual site assessment and will be determined on a case by case basis.

An amendment has been made to page 4-3, under Locating Street Trees to include reference to off road cycleways and shared user paths with other infrastructure.

Plan needs protocols for detailed assessment of a street prior to undertaking any planting to detail potential impacts of new trees on assests and other issues.

Protocols are not part of this plan. These will be done at the implementation stage, consistent with Council’s Street Tree Planting Policy.

Council should support tree removal if people can prove that tree roots are causing a lot of damage to their pipes.

This matter is covered under Council’s Tree Preservation and Landscape Policy. This issue is also addressed under policy RO4006.

Road widths given as nominal 9 m, but these vary. Scale of trees should be in proportion to the scale of the roadway.

See Detail 4 for narrow 5.0 m roadway and Detail 5 for wide 14 m carrageway.

Communicating and educating residents of the rationale for the species selected.

This is done during the notification stage.

Need to ensure sufficient resources for pruning and care of street trees, particularly for carrying out formative pruning.

Formative pruning of street trees is considered on request on a case by case basis.

Why not encourage people to look after their street tree, with nature strip garden as a carrot; new trees should be mature and able to survive and not be expected to be nurtured by the residents; only allow trees well spaced, not shrub planting under; street tree planting helps reduce nature strip parking.

This issue is dealt with by Council’s Street Tree Planting Policy and Nature Strip Planting Policy and is not considered in this Plan – street tree planting material is selected to ensure establishment is self supporting following initial planting.

Add bushland zoning on p2.4.

An amendment has been made to page 2-4 to include references to zoning bushland as a separate category to other Public Open Space.

Add guiding principles for species selection to section 3.9; Clarify endemic to where, cascading list of origin of species included as a principle and the master list annotated.

No changes to draft to include guiding principles will be made as this is more appropriate during implementation.

The tables in 3.9 Master Species List have been amended to include more specific information on origin of species, identifying those indigenous to Lane Cove LGA and the Sydney Region.

Include rational for selection of other non-native trees currently not relatively common street tree plantings.

 

See page 3-8 and 3-9 for discussion about a balance between native and exotic street tree selection. Trees such as Zelkova serrata which are not currently common are proposed for specific locations due to reliability and appearance. 

Specific Species

 

Brush boxes are too big and have excessive amount of leaf and bark litter.

Comments noted. Brush boxes are proposed only to continue existing avenues.

Bottlebrush need pruning and respond well to hard pruning, too messy.

Comments noted. Bottlebrush are proposed in streets where there are existing Bottlebrush.

Doesn’t like Jacarandas, too messy and spread into bushland.

Comments noted. Jacarandas are proposed in streets where there are a number of existing Jacarandas to create more uniformity.

Use blueberry ash more.

This species is already widely planted as a street tree.

Use old man banksia more.

This species is proposed for a number of streets.

Cotoneasters and the like can be dangerous and crowd paths.

Comments noted. Shrubs such as Cotoneasters are not included in this plan.

Specific Streets

 

Not happy about species for King William St, like to see Illawarra Flame trees, Jacaranda or bauhinia.

This street has extremely varied plantings and would benefit from more uniformity. Eucalyptus are proposed where there are wide nature strips providing space for larger trees. Existing Bauhinia under power lines will be retained.

Remove 2 existing trees outside 29 Innes.

Removal of existing street trees is not part of this plan. Tree removal is done following assessment  as part of the street tree maintenance program.

Like the paperbarks along the highway.

Comments noted. Paperbarks will be retained until they cause excessive issues or decline. Proposed species will suit narrow nature strips.

Tall eucs in Fourth Ave causing problems, plan should not include further planting of these tall trees as they are not practical Scale of trees proposed for Fourth Ave inappropriate.

The plan proposed a range of species, including lemon-scented gums and smaller trees under wires. Note there are dwarf Eucalyptus varieties available within the proposed species pallete.

Like ABC in Taleeban.

Streets priorities for ABC have established trees where existing tree health and forms would be substantially improved.  

Why not native frangipani in Handcock Lane instead of camellia sasanqua.

There are a small number of native frangipani used as street trees, which will be retained but the species has not been included in the master plan due to the variable performance results of this species within the street scene.

What is meant by the existing cluster of tall signature trees at the terminal of the main corridors at Greenwich, Northwood and Longueville.

See specific sections on pages 6.6, 6.7, 6.9 and 6.12 for more detail. Proposal is for planting in or near parks at the end of these roads to reinforce the existing landscape.

Centennial Ave between Mowbray Rd and Epping Road should be included in main road corridor, currently undergoing majore change; reintroduce HH’s flexible and inexpensive approach (p2-4).

Included as main road corridor in discussion 6.2 and table on 7.50. Map on p6.2 has been amended.

Trees at the eastern end of Lucretia Ave are very messy, don’t extend this planting along street.

Avenue planting of Brush box planted at eastern end will not be extended. Species proposed are smooth barked gums.

Trees in Richardson St not maintained properly by Council.

Comments noted.

Concerns about trees in the Plaza block gutters, birds nesting in trees are too noisy; remove trees and plant shrubs.

Trees within Plaza are not included in this Plan.

Crepe myrtles in Romani are pleasant and serve the street well.

Comments noted. The plan proposes continuing with crepe myrtle in this area.

Replacing ornamental cherries in Best/Cope St with water gums – duller.

Existing ornamental cherries will be retained but these trees are not included in the master species list due to their overall performance, limited life expectancy and problems associated with being shallow rooted street trees.

Difference between 2 sections of Cope St, LC need a difference mix of species either side of Penrose St.

Comments noted. Different character is mentioned in the key observations.

Don’t introduce exotic species in streets where they currently aren’t planted eg Buckinghamia in William Edward St and Gordonia in Kenneth St.

This is one of a number of species suggested as accent species in specific locations as there are no comparable native trees available.

Include rational for camellia sasanqua for Osborne Park.

Camelias are reliably perfoming small tree suitable for narrow nature strips under wires – there are no comparable native trees available.

Not happy with suggestions for Northwood Rd to replace Phoenix palms if they fail, suggest white trunked Eucs, Angophora or Turpentine.

Comments noted. Proposed species are yellow bloodwoods and paperbarks. Eucalyptus species are also likely to be utilised.

 

These submissions have been considered and as a result there are a number of minor changes to the Draft Plan that had been exhibited.

Due to the size of the Plan it has been attached electronically at AT-1 and can be viewed online. Hard copies will be available at Lane Cove and Greenwich Libraries.

 

Use of Dwarf Eucalyptus

Dwarf varieties of some of the Eucalyptus species mentioned in the draft Street Tree Master Plan are available for planting. These varieties of Eucalypt are now included in the Plan, replacing the larger varieties of like Eucalypt. Due to the fact that hybrid varieties continually change as hybrid technology develops, the Master Plan only includes the parent names (genus/species) in the master plan, allowing more flexibility for future plant selection.. Depending on the dwarf variety these trees would grow between 5-10m, minimising the risk of injury or fatality in the instance of falling branches that is cause by 25-30m trees; an issue which has been raised as a concern by Councillors in past meetings. 5m varieties of Eucalyptus are particularly useful for planting under power lines, whilst 10m versions of the dwarf varieties can provide appropriate canopy coverage whilst reducing the risk factor significantly.

 

Conclusion

The final Street Tree Master Plan dated April 2014 is ready for adoption by Council under one of the following options:-

1.   To adopt the Lane Cove Street Tree Master Plan dated April 2014 on the proviso that dwarf species of Eucalyptus, up to 10m, replace like Eucalyptus varieties (Staff preferred option). This reduces the risk concerns the community has expressed in terms of using the larger variety of Eucalyptus trees and allows better flexibility when planting under power lines, whilst still allowing some form of unity with street plantings; and

2.   To adopt the Lane Cove Street Tree Master Plan dated April 2014 on the proviso no species of Eucalyptus are used – this would include the dwarf varieties of Eucalypts. This would cause issues in terms of landscaping as a number of streets currently contain Eucalypts and planting other species amongst them would make the street look disjointed/out of place – Eucalyptus species form over 20% of our current street trees and this has already been reflected in the Street Tree Master Plan.

Upon Council’s decision on the preferred option, staff will make the necessary changes to the Street Tree Master Plan prior to release to the public.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

1.         Council adopt the Lane Cove Street Tree Master Plan dated April 2014 on the proviso that dwarf species of Eucalyptus replace the larger like Eucalyptus varieties; and

2.         The Plan is to be amended with the changes outlined in 1. prior to public release of the document.

 

 

 

 

 

Wayne Rylands

Executive Manager

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Street Tree Master Plan - April 2014

182 Pages

Circulated Separately

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 August 2014

Henley Street School Day Parking Restrictions

 

 

Subject:          Henley Street School Day Parking Restrictions    

Record No:    SU5044 - 45292/14

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Hastono van Hien 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council staff received complaints from Lane Cove West Public School (LCWPS) and its P&C about vehicles not being able to travel through Henley Street during the end of the school day (3-4pm) due to cars parking on both sides of the road. A proposal to remove parking from the north side of Henley Street during the end of the school day was presented at the May 2014 Local Traffic Committee meeting and subsequently approved. However, the Traffic Committee recommended that the wider community be consulted on various schemes to overcome the traffic issues on Henley Street.

 

Council staff undertook community consultation on three parking schemes with local residents, school parents and school staff. The results of the consultation showed that the proposal to install a ‘No Stopping’ restriction on the north side of Henley Street during the end of the school day gathered the most support.

 

Background

 

Lane Cove West Public School (LCWPS) and Council successfully implemented a ‘No Stopping Zone’ on the east side of Cullen Street to facilitate two-way traffic and improve visibility during the start and end of the school day. As a result of the traffic management scheme, parents are only able to pick up and drop off students on the school-side (west side) of Cullen Street. Families who access Cullen Street from Moore Street (to the north) are able to access the Cullen Street Drop-off Zone by looping around Henley Street and Hallam Avenue.

 

LCWPS and its P&C have complained that vehicles are often parked on both sides of Henley Street during the end of the school day. As a result, there have been a number of occasions where larger cars and after-school coaches have not been able to pass through Henley Street. LCWPS and the P&C recommended that a No Stopping Zone be installed on the north side of Henley Street during the end of the school day (3-4pm) to improve road safety and two-way traffic flow.

The Henley Street north-side No Stopping restriction for the end of school days (3-4pm) was presented at the May 2014 Local Traffic Committee meeting. The Traffic Committee did not have any objections to the proposal and also recommended the No Stopping restriction could be installed on the south-side of Henley Street instead. Traffic Committee resolved that the wider local community (school parents, school staff and local residents) be consulted on the proposed schemes.

 

Discussion

 

Road Geometry

 

Henley Street is a two-way local road in Lane Cove West that provides a link between Cullen Street and Hallam Avenue. At present there is unrestricted parking on both sides of Henley Street for a total of about 81 cars. The width of Henley Street, however, is not considered to be adequate to accommodate two-way traffic flow and parking on both sides of the road.

 

Henley Street is approximately 7.2m wide along its entire length. Australian Standards recommend on-street parking space widths of 2.5 wide and 3m wide travel lanes. Henley Street should therefore be 11m wide to accommodate two-way traffic and parking on both sides. Given the low volumes of traffic experienced on Henley Street outside of school peak times it is reasonable for Henley Street to only provide enough width for one travel lane. Henley Street should therefore be 8m wide.

 

LCWPS and P&C have expressed that Henley Street is not wide enough at the ‘bend’ section of the road (between Cullen Street and No. 17 Henley Street) to accommodate one lane of traffic and parking on either side. This is because vehicles have wider swept-paths when turning. There have been no complaints about the width of the road along the ‘straight’ section of Henley Street (between No. 17 Henley Street and Hallam Avenue)

 

Existing Parking Utilisation

 

Council staff conducted a parking utilisation survey for the period between 3pm and 4pm on 24 July 2014. The results of the survey showed the parking utilisation to be as follows:-

 

 

Section of Henley Street

Time

Cullen Street to

No.17 Henley Street

(north side)

max 13 spaces

Cullen Street to

No.17 Henley Street

(side side)

max 17 spaces

No. 17 Henley Street to Hallam Avenue

(west side)

max 25 spaces

No. 17 Henley Street to Hallam Avenue

(east side)

max 26 spaces

TOTAL

Henley Street

max 81 spaces

15:00

9

8

4

3

24

15:10

9

10

6

3

28

15:20

11

13

9

4

37

15:30

12

11

9

9

41

15:40

10

10

9

6

35

15:50

8

6

9

5

28

16:00

7

4

6

3

20

 

The survey results show that the peak time in terms of parking utilisation is 15:30, which is around the end of the school day (end-of-school bell). During the busiest period, parking along the entire length of Henley Street is 51% utilised. The survey results also show that the majority of spare parking capacity is along the straight section of Henley Street.

 

The results of the survey suggest that any parking displaced from either side of the ‘bend’ section of Henley Street could be accommodated on the ‘straight’ section of Henley Street.

 

Proposed Schemes

 

Three schemes were put forward to the local community during the consultation exercises. The pros and cons of each scheme are set out below:-

 

Option A – ‘No Stopping (3-4pm, School Days)’ between 35 Cullen Street and 20 Henley Street

 

Pros:

·    Provides space for through-traffic on ‘bend’ section of Henley Street;

·    Allows parents to drop off and pick up from park side. Children are not required to cross the road. Reduces risk of accidents; and

·    Less parking is removed during end of school day period (3-4pm).

 

Cons:

·    Residents lose on-street parking spaces outside of their properties during end of school day period (3-4pm); and

·    Requires parents driving from north of the school to access the Henley Street informal drop-off zone by looping around Cullen Street and Hallam Avenue (increases traffic circulation).

 

Option B – ‘No Stopping (3-4pm, School Days)’ between Cullen Street and 17 Henley Street

 

Pros:

·    Provides space for through-traffic on ‘bend’ section of Henley Street;

·    Allows parents driving from north of the school to access Henley Street informal drop-off zone directly from Cullen Street (reduces traffic circulation); and

·    Residents do not lose on-street parking spaces in front of their properties during end of school day period (3-4pm).

                                                               

Cons:

·    Children are required to cross Henley Street for pick-up/drop-off activities; and

·    More unrestricted parking spaces are removed during end of school day period (3-4pm).

 

No Changes

 

Pros:

·    Residents do not lose on-street parking spaces in front of their properties during end of school day period (3-4pm); and

·    Allows parents driving from north of the school to access Henley Street informal drop-off zone directly from Cullen Street (reduces traffic circulation).

                                                               

Cons:

·    Risk of through-traffic being blocked by parked cars; and

·    Children may be required to cross Henley Street for pick-up/drop-off activities.

 

 

Community Consultation

 

The community consultation targeted the key stakeholders of the scheme, which included local residents, school parents and school staff. All residents of Henley Street were posted notification letters with a questionnaire to be returned to Council staff. School parents and staff were consulted via an online survey that was developed to capture the support for each of the three schemes.

 

In total, Council staff received 189 responses through the two consultation methods. This included responses from 137 parents, 33 staff members and 19 residents of Henley Street. The results of the survey show that around half of the respondents (52%) supported Option A (north side restriction) whereas 19% supported Option B (south side restriction) and 26% supported Option C (no changes).

 

The consultation results show that the majority of parents and staff prefer Option A whereas Henley Street residents prefer Option B. The breakdown of what type of respondent supported each scheme is summarised below.

 

 

A

B

C

Other

TOTAL

Parents

65.5

24.5

42

5

137

Staff

29.5

2.5

1

0

33

Residents

3.5

9.5

6

0

19

 

98.5

36.5

49

5

189

 

52%

19%

26%

3%

 

NOTE: ½ votes were allocated when respondents stated that they supported both Option A and Option B.

 

 

Consultation responses from residents of properties directly affected by the schemes (35 Cullen Street and No. 28 to No. 20 Henley Street) showed no clear preference in a scheme. In total, only 4 of the 8 properties provided responses – 2 supported Option A and 2 supported Option B.

 

Some respondents also recommended that the restriction be used during the start of the school day.

 

Conclusion

 

Considering the merits of each scheme and the level of support displayed during the consultation exercise, it is recommended that Option A (north side restrictions) be implemented on Henley Street to improve traffic flow and road safety during the end of the school day.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

1.    Install ‘No Stopping (3-4pm School Days)’ between No. 35 Cullen Street and No. 20 Henley Street;

2.    Monitor traffic operations on Henley Street during the start of the school day; and

3.    Consider a further report on whether similar ‘No Stopping’ restrictions are required for the start of the school day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wayne Rylands

Executive Manager

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 August 2014

8-14 Mindarie Street: Options

 

 

Subject:          8-14 Mindarie Street: Options    

Record No:    SU5039 - 44814/14

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):      Christopher Pelcz 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Following recent decisions by both the NSW Department of Planning & Environment and NSW Planning Assessment Commission, to retain the existing R4 High Density Residential zoning for 8-14 Mindarie Street, Lane Cove North Council resolved to consider other options to address the concerns of some residents in the area.

 

Background

 

Council previously resolved to submit a planning proposal down zoning 8-14 Mindarie Street to E4 Environmental Living (single dwelling houses) which was recently refused by both the NSW Department of Planning & Environment and NSW Planning Assessment Commission. The reasons for refusal are detailed in the previous Council reports on 17 February 2014 and 21 July 2014.

 

In response to both refusals, Council at its Ordinary meeting on 21 July 2014, resolved in part that:-

“4.     The General Manager provide a report to the next Council meeting regarding possible down zoning options for the sites.”

 

Discussion

 

A planning proposal was submitted to the Department and the Commission to maintain single dwelling houses for these properties, to address the concerns of the residential properties fronting Kullah Parade. Their concerns related to privacy, overshadowing, solar access, visual impacts, amenity etc.

 

The Department and the Commission refused the application, having taken the view that the current Local Environmental Plan and Development Control Plan controls are acceptable as they allow for an appropriate level of transition without affecting the development potential of either 8-14 Mindarie St or the residents zoned as single dwelling houses. As a result of this, it is likely that any change in zoning would not be supported either by the Department of Planning & Environment or the Planning Assessment Commission at this time.

 

Notwithstanding such one potential option that can be explored is the reduction in zoning to R3 Medium Density Residential. These zones allow for townhouses at a maximum floor space ratio of 0.7:1 and a maximum building height of 9.5 metres. Townhouses are classified under the Standard Instrument Local Environmental Plan as multi-dwelling housing which “means 3 or more dwellings (whether attached or detached) on one lot of land, each with access at ground level, but does not include a residential flat building”. Currently multi-dwelling housing is permissible in both R3 Medium Density Residential and R4 High Density Residential.

 

Based on site constraints, it maybe questionable whether or not a proposal for townhouses in this location would comply with Council’s Development Control Plan or be viable. The site area is 1,765m2, assuming the townhouse controls mentioned above were in place, this would result in only 1,236m2 of the site being developable. When applying the existing DCP controls this may only result in potentially 4-5 townhouses being built on the site, compared to 3 houses that are currently on the site. The development feasibility of this approach would be questionable, the development potential of 8-14 Mindarie St would be significantly impacted and, as mentioned above, may not be supported by the Department.

 

Having regard to the Department & Commission’s stated view as well as the concerns of residents, immediate and surrounding, it is noted that the Mowbray Precinct currently has site-specific and general residential flat building development controls in its Development Control Plan. These transitional provisions are mentioned in Part C Residential Localities: Locality 6 – Mowbray Precinct & Part C Residential Development: C.3 – Residential Flat Buildings.

 

These transitional provisions aim to minimise potential impacts for changing zones with regard to privacy, overshadowing, solar access, visual impacts, amenity etc. Site-specific provisions include:-

a)   A maximum number of residential storeys applies, relating to the LEP height limits, as follows:

i)          LEP maximum height 11.5m – 3 residential storeys.

e)   Development applications at the interface between the high and low density residential zones are to demonstrate that the amenity of adjacent houses has been a design consideration by stepping the building in at least 3m after the second level.

f)    Development proposals are to be in character with the palette of materials, finishes and design elements that are in harmony with the natural landscape and complementary with the bushland setting of the precinct. In addition, roof form articulation is encouraged.

 

As well as the above transitional provisions, Part C Residential Development: C.3 – Residential Flat Buildings also applies to the Mowbray Precinct and seek to minimise adverse impacts to dwellings adjoining the R4 zone.

 

Conclusion

 

The rezoning of 8-14 Mindarie Street from R4 High Density Residential to R3 Medium Density Residential is an option available to Council, notwithstanding the consistent view of the Department of Planning that R4 is appropriate. The Development Control Plan contains specific provisions for a transition between high and low density residential uses in the precinct to guide future development and seek to maintain amenity for the adjoining and nearby dwellings fronting Kullah Parade.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council:-

1.   Receive and note the report; and

2.   Determine whether to proceed with an “R3” zoning.

 

 

 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Previous Advice from Dept of Planning & PAC (incl. post-Gateway Review Request)

8 Pages

AT‑2 View

Mowbray DCP Extract

2 Pages

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 August 2014

St Leonards Public Domain Master Plan

 

 

Subject:          St Leonards Public Domain Master Plan    

Record No:    SU4459 - 46859/14

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Wayne Rylands 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

In 2006, Council adopted the St Leonards Strategy. Amongst other public domain initiatives, the Strategy introduced the idea of a bus interchange & widened walkway over the rail corridor, south of the Pacific Highway.

 

In 2010, Council’s new LEP came into effect and included rezoning of the commercial areas of St Leonards to encourage redevelopment of a dilapidated and rundown building stock. Within 12 months two new major development proposals, either side of the rail corridor were being pursued at 1-25 Marshall Avenue, and 88 Christie Street. More recently, planning proposals have been received for properties at 472-520 Pacific Highway and 15-25 Marshall Avenue that would provide a revenue stream for Council to provide quality public domain.

 

This possible increase in development activity within the St Leonards area has identified a need for a Public Domain Master Plan to be developed. This Plan should provide a clear direction for the provision of major public domain spaces and connectivity for the whole community.

 

 Staff have developed a draft Plan that is recommended for adoption for the purposes of public exhibition. The Plan is provided as AT-1.

 

Background

 

The concept of a Plaza and Bus Rail Interchange was mooted in 2006, when Lane Cove, North Sydney and Willoughby Councils joined with the Department of Planning to develop the St Leonards Strategy. The Plan identified the need to improve public transport usage through provision of a Bus Interchange on the southern side of the Pacific Highway, opposite the Forum and over the rail corridor. This included providing a widened footpath area adjacent to the bus interchange. The Strategy also identified the need to improve the public domain, particularly within the dilapidated areas of St Leonards within the Lane Cove LGA.

 

In response to this, Council adopted a new LEP in 2009 (gazette in 2010) with rezoning of the dilapidated areas within St Leonards. The rezoning encouraged two developers to pursue major redevelopments in Marshall Avenue & Christie Street. Loftex proposed a series of high density residential apartment blocks for 1-25 Marshall Avenue, whilst Winton Properties pursued a commercial development on the ex-Nature Care College site at 88 Christie Street (and 75-79 Lithgow Street).

 

Based on the St Leonards Strategy proposal for a Bus Interchange with widened footway, and the proposed major redevelopments in Marshall Avenue and Christie Street, Council identified a “once in a lifetime” opportunity to supplement the bus interchange with a major public domain inspired plaza area. This plaza area would span the rail corridor providing great east west connectivity and could also provide significantly improved connectivity to St Leonards Rail Station by providing either escalators/lifts/stairs beneath the Pacific Highway to link directly with the station platforms or via an elevated pedestrian overpass that would link through the Forum development again to the station.

 

Council commenced a lengthy process in mid-2011 (that continues until this day) with the State Government, including a number of its Ministers and departments to espouse the idea of the Bus Rail Interchange & Plaza.  In September 2013 Council commenced a series of meetings with Transport for NSW (TfNSW) (as landowner) regarding their requirements to proceed with project.

 

Due to slow progress with discussions in March 2014 Council considered the matter of the St Leonards Bus Rail Interchange & Plaza in March, when it resolved inter-alia:-

 

That Council arrange a meeting with the Honorable Gladys Berejiklian, Minister for Transport and the Honorable Anthony Roberts, State Member for Lane Cove, to seek the NSW Government’s support for Council to progress the proposed St Leonards Bus Rail Interchange & Plaza to a detailed investigation and design phase, such that a tender process for the works can be undertaken.

 

Upon seeking the meeting, Council was directed by Minister Berejiklian’s Office to Transport for NSW (TfNSW).

 

Since that time two QS estimates have been prepared for the project, following Council’s initial QS estimate being significantly (50%) less that the TfNSW estimates. Weekly meeting have now commenced to resolve the difference to allow the viability of the project to be assessed.

 

The next stage will be the detailed planning required to ensure the proposal does not interfere with the proposed expansion of St Leonards Station as part of Sydney’s rail future, which involves a second harbour crossing.

 

While the approval process has taken considerably longer than first envisaged, the opportunities to fund the project through development activity within St Leonards has progressed quickly.

 

With the lodgment of the planning proposals at 472-520 Pacific Highway, there is the need to formalise  a comprehensive public domain master plan that considers a broader area, inclusive of Friedlander Place and the pedestrian desire lines between that space and the proposed rail plaza.

 

Discussion

 

A vision for St Leonards was established in the 2006 Strategy as follows:-

 

St Leonards will continue to develop as one of the major employment centres for knowledge based industries within the Sydney Metropolitan region, by capitalising on its location within Sydney’s ‘global arc’ and building on opportunities arising from its excellent accessibility and co-location with regional scaled health and educational facilities.

 

New and diverse housing opportunities will continue to emerge and be supported by convenience shopping, cafes, bars, entertainment venues, community facilities, a high quality environment and excellent public transport, walking and cycling accessibility, creating a desirable place for cosmopolitan urban living.

 

New development and public domain improvements will create a more consistent and high quality image throughout the centre, leading to an identifiable ‘sense of place’.

 

Although St Leonards will retain its link to employment through knowledge based industries such as medical practices and the Royal North Shore Hospital, recent property activity suggests that the Commercial core component of St Leonards is no longer supportive as a major general office area. The economic assessment undertaken by Urbis Planning as part of the Planning Proposal for  472-520 Pacific Highway is a 4th tier office destination, which has increased completion from 70,000sqm of floor space on the Royal North Shore Hospital site and the Gore Hill Technology Park. In recent years, numerous properties throughout St Leonards within the North Sydney and Willoughby LGA’s have converted from commercial to residential.

It is now becoming evident through recent development activity that St Leonards will develop as a major residential centre, and that there will be new and diverse housing opportunities. In the Lane Cove LGA, Loftex acquired the 13 residential properties on the northern side of Marshall Avenue, proposing to construct well over 300 apartments. The Leightons/Charter Hall planning proposal to redevelop 472-520 Pacific Highway to residential will result in another 900 apartments being constructed in the Lane Cove LGA. The proposed 1200+ apartments will provide greater density of residential dwellings than the rest of the existing St Leonards South precinct that is bound by the Pacific Highway, Greenwich Road, River Road and the rail corridor. This area has also now been identified as well located for increased density, and is the subject of the St Leonards South Planning Study.

 

Finally, within the last month, Winton has approached Council regarding their site at 88 Christie Street, investigating the possibility of altering the use from purely commercial to mixed use, with a major retail and residential component.

 

Should all of this redevelopment actually occur then as espoused in the St Leonards Strategy 2006, Council will need to make provision for convenience shopping, cafes, bars, entertainment venues, community facilities, and a high quality public domain environment. This public domain will need to be able to meet the following objectives:-

 

(a)  To provide public space that contributes to the identity and enjoyment of an area;

(b)  To provide street furniture, landscaping works, water features, utilities, etc that contribute to the community’s enjoyment of the public domain, but does not impede pedestrian movement and safety or reduce visual quality;

(c)  To provide venues for public entertainment and expression of community identity;

(d)  To provide areas for public art that contributes to the cultural life and enjoyment of the centre, and allows for community self expression; and

(e)  To provide pedestrian surfaces that are safe for all users, clearly demarcated and constructed from materials that provide continuity and consistency of streetscape.

 

The draft St Leonards Public Domain Master Plan, tabled as AT-1, provides a document that espouses key public domain principles with the likely future public spaces that will create an identifiable ‘sense of place’ for the community.

 

The Master Plan is recommended to be placed on exhibition for public comment.  The Plan attempts to provide the strategic framework required to inform and support future Council decisions in relation to the provision of public domain and community connectivity in St Leonards. It is acknowledged individual public domain projects will be of interest to the specific neighbourhoods as well as to the wider community. 

 

Community Consultation Strategy

 

The Master Plan is recommended to be placed on exhibition for public comment.  The Plan attempts to provide the strategic framework required to inform and support future Council decisions in relation to the provision of public domain and community connectivity in the . Council acknowledges that individual public domain projects will be of interest to the specific neighbourhood as well as to the wider community. 

 

Consultation Statement of Intent

 

The consultation methods outlined below have been designed to use a number of processes to engage with the community on the philosophy underlying the draft St Leonards Public Domain Master Plan. Council is seeking the views of the community in relation to the appropriateness of utilising Voluntary Planning Agreements to fund public domain facilities and the suitability of the individual public domain projects to be implemented. Comments received will assist Council in finalising the public domain master plan and how best to provide the public spaces and connections within a timely and affordable program.

 

Methods of Consultation

 

Consultation Strategy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inform

Involve

Consult

Consult

Consult

Target Audience

Property Owners and Residents within the immediate catchment area

400 members of the Lane Cove Community, demography based.

Key message givers eg; presidents of local resident associations, businesses, & chairs of residential body corporate

Lane Cove Community

Lane Cove Community

Proposed Medium

Notification Letter

Deliberative poll (Further consultation will be undertaken with those initially involved with the poll to determine their views on the detail of the draft Plan.

Briefing sessions

Staffed exhibition over 2 days, Thursday  Evening and Saturday Morning

Community Newsletter

Website Survey

Public Exhibition

 

Conclusion

 

With major changes to the role of St Leonards, Council has the opportunity to provide new public domain spaces and connections that will provide the area with an identifiable ‘sense of place’.

The draft St Leonards Public Domain Master Plan is the document that will assist Council to develop this new public domain, and inform the community on what can be expected of the new spaces and connections.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

  1. Council adopt the Draft St Leonards Public Domain Master Plan 2014 dated August 2014 for the purposes of public exhibition;

 

  1. The Draft St Leonards Public Domain Master Plan 2014 be placed on public exhibition for 60 days and consultation take place in accordance with the Consultation Strategy outlined in the report; and

 

  1. A further report be submitted to Council following the exhibition period, to consider the final Draft St Leonards Public Domain Master Plan 2014 for adoption.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wayne Rylands

Executive Manager

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Draft St Leonards Public Domain Master Plan

12 Pages

 

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 August 2014

Tender Negotiations for Construction of Recreational Community Facility (Scout Hall and Amenities Block) At Blackman Park

 

 

Subject:          Tender Negotiations for Construction of Recreational Community Facility (Scout Hall and Amenities Block) At Blackman Park    

Record No:    SU5138 - 46363/14

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):      Tony Fazio 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report provides details on the tender negotiation with all five (5) tenderers who previously lodged submissions with Council. It is recommends that the revised bid from Project Corp Australia be accepted subject to the lodgement of a Section 96 Application capturing the revised design changes.

 

Background

 

Council at its July 2014 meeting (Minute No. 156) resolved to:-

 

1.   Note all tenders are considerably above Council and the Scouts estimated budget for the project;

 

2.   Reject all tenders and as Council has called tenders and identified suitable organisations  rather than call fresh tenders, enter into negotiations with all tenderers to achieve a lower cost by scaling the level of finishes and revisiting the design and construction alternatives for the substructure works;

 

3.   Authorise the General Manager to conduct negotiations with all tenderers and a further report be submitted to Council outlining the result of the negotiations; and

 

4.   Approve the determination of any Section 96 Application , under delegated authority by the General Manager.

 

All tenderers were provided with a brief and three (3) works priority lists compiled by Mr Paul McIntyre, the Scouts’ representative, the Principal of AJA architects Mr Jon Johanssen and Council Officers. The purpose of the works priority lists and the negotiations was to reduce the project cost down to the project budget. Whilst each site has its own challenges, the costs associated with construction on this land which was previously a tip, with up to 20 metre of material, adds significant costs.

 

All tenderers were required to return the revised bids by 4.00pm Friday 8 August 2014.

 

Discussion

 

The tender negotiations failed to deliver the desired “upper budget “target set by Council of $1.8 Million, with all the revised bids being considerably higher than expected.

 

All the revised bids achieved substantial savings with many of the upper end finishes included in the original design deleted together with a number of minor internal and external modifications. The modifications have not changed the overall external profile or scale of the building.

 

The revised bid from one contractor achieved substantial savings but it included the removal of two (2) bays and and a change of the roof profile by introducing a central ridge roof line which was not considered acceptable and did not achieve the lowest price for the project.

Another proposal included a total redesign of the roof profile to a Skillion which was not considered acceptable, and did not achieve the lowest price for the project.

 

Another alternate proposal included a ”lock up stage” price which would have required considerable project management input by Council and the Scouts throughout the construction phase and subsequent engagement of contractors for the fit out of the building. This option whilst potentially saving money, also has the highest risk to Council of increased cost, and the added complexity of the final certification demarcation line not being clearly defined. The same tenderer also advised that it could act as a nominated subcontractor to the delivery of all substructure works to any other tenderer if required.

 

The lowest revised tender which accommodates the overall external profile and existing scale of the building, was from Project Corp Australia at $2.4M. This is still some $850,000 over the original budget, which consisted of $650,000 from Scouts and $900,000 from Council.

 

Council has two options:-

 

1.   Abandon the current scheme and redesign, this would mean the final building would need to be considerably smaller which would impact on functionality of the building. It is unlikely a revised scheme could be completed by the end of 2015, meaning there are no amenities available for users of the new synthetic fields; and

 

2.   Provide additional funding to complete the project at its existing scale.

 

If Council pursues option 2 it would be appropriate to ensure the hall can also act as a multi-purpose facility for the whole community. In this regard staff  have worked with the Scouts on an internal reconfiguration, which would see the main hall double in size from a square 14m x 14m to a rectangular 28m x 14m, which is achieved by deletion of the separate Venturers area and reduction in the Scouts storage area down to 42sqm. The before and after plans are included as AT-1.

 

The Scouts, as they are part funding the project, would have first priority in the use of the hall facilities. The lease to the Scouts will allow access by the general community and revenue will be shared between Council and the Scouts based on the proportion of contribution to the Hall component. Mr Paul McIntyre following the meeting of the Scouts Group Committee on Tuesday, 12 August 2014 advised that the committee generally received the changes favourably but requested further clarification.

 

Funding

 

If Council proceeds with Option 2, it will need to fund $1.8 million to meet the increased cost of $900,000. Council has sufficient Reserves to fund this amount, with $500,000 of the required funds coming from the saving between the pre tender budget for the Plaza and the actual tenders received.

 

Conclusion

 

Given the outcome of the tender negotiations and the Scouts’ general consensus to the design review, it is recommended that Council accept the revised tender bid from Project Corp Australia. Acceptance of the renegotiated tender bid will be subject to a further revision of the cost savings based on the redesigned layout, and investigations into further savings based on the subsurface works being undertaken by an experienced piling and post tensioning concrete slab/beam contractor who would be acting as the nominated subcontractor. 

Project Corp Australia would then take full responsibility for final certification of the structure on completion. Project Corp Australia will also be required to stage the works to deliver critical stages of the project to meet its completion targets commitments by March 2015.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

 

1.   Engage Project Corp Australia P/L to construct the new Recreational Sporting and Community Facility at Blackman Park subject to a review of the renegotiated bid of $2.45 million Excl GST; subject to Council minimising its transactional risks associated with awarding the contract to Project Corp;

 

2.   Authorise the General Manager to review the renegotiated bid for optimum cost and program delivery;

 

3.   Authorise the General Manager to enter into a contract with Project Corp Australia P/L for the construction of the facility; and

 

4.   Adjust the budget for the project to $1.8M.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Original Ground Plan - Blackman Park Scout Hall and Amenities Building

1 Page

 

AT‑2 View

Revised Layout of Blackman Park Community Facility

1 Page

 

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 August 2014

Lane Cove Council Meets the Neighbours Events

 

 

Subject:          Lane Cove Council Meets the Neighbours Events    

Record No:    SU4985 - 45457/14

Division:         Human Services Division

Author(s):      Corinne Dickinson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council prides itself on having a Village feel. At the Ordinary Council Meeting of 19 May 2014 a series of ‘Meet the Neighbour’ events were proposed. The specific objectives were:-

·    To receive a report on a series of events branded for example ‘Lane Cove Council Meets the Neighbours’ designed to facilitate a closeness with our community and further bolster Council’s reputation as a leader in its community consultation practices;

·    Timings to be Saturday afternoons  1.00pm - 4.00pm with the pilot to be held at Helen Street Reserve with Meeting House on Stokes Street to be used as a possible wet weather alternative; and

·    Local State Members be invited to attend each event.

 

The proposed series would complement the Love Where You Live program and some of its related resources. Held in open spaces, the events would also strengthen outcomes within Council’s Delivery Program.

 

Based on the suggestions provided at the Council Meeting, staff have estimated that the cost of running each event would be in the vicinity of $5,000. This would include entertainment, refreshments and promotions for a three (3) hour afternoon event. The event would be open to the wider community with an emphasis on promotion to those who can access the venue locally.

 

Three (3) events are to be held between Spring 2014 and Neighbour Day in March 2015. Following the first event the costs for the second and third trial events in East and Central Ward would be allocated.

 

Background

 

Council has recently developed a Love Where You Live campaign to promote community pride and celebrate Lane Cove as a great place to live, work and play.  The branded campaign complements a number of outcomes within Council’s annual operational plan including opportunities to encourage interaction at a neighbourhood level as well as the promotion of community pride and respect.

 

At the Ordinary Council Meeting of 19 May 2014, Council requested a report regarding the options for hosting a series of events that facilitate a closeness within the community and enhance Council’s community consultation practices. Suggested activities included:-

a)    A community sausage sizzle;

b)    Children entertainment incorporating: a Jumping castle, balloons, face painting, possible animal farm;

c)    A raised platform and audio facilities for formalities;

d)    An invitation be extended to the Lane Cove Concert Band to perform on the afternoon;

e)    An invitation be extended to Blue Fit Gym, or other local gym, to provide sponsorship in the way of a complimentary outdoor Zumba class;

f)     An advertisement in the North Shore Times inviting community attendance; and

g)    Flyers to be created and placed in the lobby area of Council.

 

Council’s intention to promote more ‘neighbourliness’ extends to initiatives within the Love Where You Live campaign such as the planned development of Welcome Packs, Guide to Street Parties and support of the National Neighbour Day campaign planned in March 2015. A number of resources have already been developed including branded pop-up tents and promotional items.

 

Council’s current public events are planned in conjunction with Lane Cove’s Festivals, cultural events, National days of celebrations or awareness of community events such as school fundraisers, sporting finals and seasonal celebrations.

 

Limited funds are spent on paid, weekly newspaper advertising of events run by Council. Where possible, events are scheduled within existing marketing such as quarterly newsletters, e-newsletters, posters, flyers and integrated into festival programs for wider promotion. The lead-time and flexibility of commercial organisations completing targeted letterbox deliveries has been challenging for the scale of work required in Lane Cove. The result has been staff time taken to deliver to targeted addresses.

 

The timing and location of current events consider the level of attendance expected. Open spaces provide convenient locations for local residents in the immediate vicinity. The degree of facilities at each site varies with almost all sites being unpowered and with considerations such as noise, access and parking required.

 

The below costs are estimated for a 3 hour afternoon event:-

 

Activity

Cost

Comment

Kindifarm

$695

Based on 2 hour booking

Jumping Castle

$500

Additional $115 for generator if no power supply. 4 hour bookings.

Facepainting

$250

 

BBQ – assistance required

$650

100 people

BBQ – volunteer fundraiser

$300

100 people

BBQ Hire

$95

Only required if not on-site

Portable café style tables, chairs and umbrellas

$675

Includes 10 tables, 40 chairs and 10 market umbrellas. Without the umbrellas the cost would be $325)

Concert Band/Entertainment

$100-$300

Donation to Concert Band or local musician for entertainment

Marketing development, printing

$700

Includes staff time to distribute via letterbox to immediate vicinity

Advertising in North Shore Times

$1,500

Strip ad, one edition

Pop-up tents

N/A

Council has recently purchased two 2m x 2m Love Where You Live tents

Portable PA

N/A

Council has a portable PA system. It does not come with a raised platform. This would be additional cost.

 

The estimated cost for materials is in the vicinity of $5,000 dependent on the various items required.

 

There is an option to consider community group involvement such as fundraising BBQs staffed by 1st Lane Cove Scouts or the Rotary Club of Lane Cove similar to those which operate in the Plaza from time to time. Sponsorship of any individual activities would need to be planned in advance and considered in relation to the park and its surrounds.

 

Discussion

 

Council continues to look for ways to reach members of the community who are not regularly involved in Council activities. From time to time particular community consultation issues may generate a higher level of community interest while ongoing education of local services available to the community is also important. The suggested format provides an opportunity for Council to be able to meet the community and discuss their needs in their own neighbourhood.

 

For the 2013 opening of the Stokes Street Community Facilities, in close proximity to the Helen Street Reserve, there was a significant effort to letterbox drop the surrounding streets with a comparatively small attendance figure. To ensure the success of a trial location at Helen Street Reserve it is suggested that it coincides with the completion of the new public art ping-pong table (due for installation late August/early September), includes a variety of information on local issues of relevance to the community, is well publicised and, in future, incorporates existing Council-run or community events which are encouraged to align with the dates (to be set in advance). It is also important to note that cross-promotion of existing events that align with dates may assist in encouraging attendance.

 

Given the expense of paid advertising in the weekly newspaper, more affordable measures such as e-newsletters, banners and on-site signage should complement these activities.  The cost of the first event could be included in existing activity budgets with the view that future events will require an allocated budget. Given the variety of events available throughout the year it is suggested that each Council Ward hosts one of these events as a trial over the Spring/Summer period.  Ideally one of the events would coincide with the National Neighbour Day held on Sunday 30 March which will help reinforce the closeness of the community.

 

It is suggested that the following dates be explored:-

 

·    West Ward – Helen Street Reserve, 27 September 2014;

·    Central Ward – Osborne Park, November 2014; and

·    East Ward – Kingsford Smith Oval, March 2015.

 

The events, while open to the wider community, are targeted at residents who can easily access these local venues. Future locations should be carefully selected to reach a broad cross-section of the community.

It is suggested that to ensure a friendly, localised event that minimal equipment is bought into the existing parks and that the event is an opportunity to highlight existing resources such as bbqs and play equipment. Entertainment options should be considered on a venue-by-venue basis however it is generally agreed that child-friendly activities will help to provide something special for the community as will the opportunity for local musicians to perform.

 

Conclusion

 

Three (3) trial Meet the Neighbour events are proposed to take place over the next six months with the third date coinciding with Neighbour Day. The event aligns with the Love Where You Live campaign and therefore some promotional material and resources can be provided.


 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

 

1.    Receive and note this report; and

 

2.    Based on the success of the first event, consider a second and third event, with the costs to be offset by a reduction in the “Screen on the Green” events.

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Gornall

Executive Manager - Human Services

Human Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 August 2014

Revised Naming of New Road, and New Park at Burns Bay Road Precinct

 

 

Subject:          Revised Naming of New Road, and New Park at Burns Bay Road Precinct     

Record No:    SU5440 - 45953/14

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):      John  Lee 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report relates to the proposed naming of the new road across 304-314 Burns Bay Road.  After resolving Bay View Drive as the proposed name it was realised that this name didn’t quite meet the NSW Geographical Names Board requirements in relation to similar sound or spelling as Bayview Street, a short section of road in Northwood.

 

The report also notes correspondence received in relation to the proposed naming of the park.

 

Background

 

At its Ordinary Meeting of 21 July 2014, Council considered a report following community consultation into proposed names for the new road, park and community centre.  Given the number of respondents who suggested Bay View as the street prefix, Council resolved for the new road to be named Bay View Drive, subject to the NSW Geographical Names Board.  Council also resolved to name the park Hughes Park.

 

Discussion

 

Unfortunately Bay View Drive doesn’t meet the unique criteria of the Names Board given that Bayview Street Northwood is located in the LGA.  Having regard to the theme of water views associated with a bay view, and noting community suggestions included “Waterview Avenue”, it is recommended that the new road be named “Water View Drive”.

 

In relation to the proposed name of the park, a number of letters were received suggesting that the name of the park should give greater recognition to early industry making use of Burns Bay in this precinct.  Council may consider that the proposed name of Hughes Park be retained or may consider revisiting the proposed naming to include the following proposed industry related names (with respondents’ commentary):-

 

a)   Mangrovite Oval

A major employer in the district in the 1900s, owning and operating the factory (Mangrovite) and adjoining land at 300 Burns Bay Road. It also owned land on which the cricket field stands;

b)   Tannery Park

Relates to the history of the area and the history could be displayed as part of the development;

c)   Rope Walk Reserve

Recognising the original industry at Linley Point.

Conclusion

 

It is proposed that the new road be named “Water View Drive”, subject to the NSW Geographical Names Board approval.  For avoidance of doubt this would replace Council’s previous resolution in respect of the proposed road name. 

Having regard to further correspondence received, Council may consider a review of the proposed park name to better reflect one of the early industries. In this regard, with the support of the Lane Cove Historical Society, it is recommended that Rope Walk Reserve or Tannery Park may suitably reflect past industries, with a preference for Rope Walk Reserve.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

 

1.   Rescind the resolution of the 21 July 2014, minute number 150 in relation to the naming of the road and park;

 

2.   Seek the approval of the NSW Geographical Names Board for the new road across 304-314 Burns Bay Road to be named Water View Drive;

3.   Approve the naming of the park as Rope Walk Reserve; and

4.   Advise affected property owners of this decision.

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 August 2014

Events on the Lane Cove and Parramatta River Foreshore

 

 

Subject:          Events on the Lane Cove and Parramatta River Foreshore    

Record No:    SU4985 - 45455/14

Division:         Human Services Division

Author(s):      Corinne Dickinson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The purpose of this report is to explore the possibilities of developing a Festival by the River or similar annual event. The discussion gives consideration to the timing and location of existing events to ensure that the proposed new event format complements the annual delivery of local festivals and related activities. As a result the background includes an overview of the existing approach to cultural festivals and events in Lane Cove.  It is anticipated that Council staff can trial the development of a foreshore program of events in the 2015 Sunset in the Village program with an emphasis on February 2015. Should these be well received then a larger-scale series could be planned for the 2015/16 delivery program.

 

Background

 

Over the past 12 months Council has worked towards refining the marketing of its events and Festivals to maximise the community’s opportunity to participate in cultural and creative activities.

 

This is further refined by the following actions identified in Council’s operational plan:-

 

·    Encourage event organisers to use facilities outside the Village;

·    Develop and refine promotion of community events through Council’s festivals program;

·    Audit the use of open spaces for existing arts and cultural festivals and events; and

·    Encourage diverse use of locations for Council’s festivals and events.

 

As a result Council staff have made the following changes to refine Council’s annual festival and event activities:-

 

Creating a Clearer Distinction Between Council’s Festivals

 

Lane Cove has three unique festivals and participates in one regional cultural festival. Over the years these have evolved to result in festivals being run concurrently and with a similar community development model.

 

Over the past year Council has worked to create a more distinct time frame and more targeted focus for each Festival to allow for clearer marketing and more valuable opportunities for the local community.

 

As a result the duration of the Autumn Harmony Festival (previously running from March through to August) and Sunset in the Village Festival (previously running from October through to March) have been reviewed and restructured. These festivals now run to monthly patterns and whilst community partnerships are formed for some events, the emphasis is on Council using these Festivals to schedule a more dynamic program that promotes best practice in cultural and public events. These programs now also encourage self-guided tours and increased awareness of facilities available to the community increasingly using venues beyond the Plaza and Village precinct.

 

The Cameraygal Festival remains the signature Festival with its focus being on community organisation participation. In the process of more clearly marking the festival dates there has been an opportunity to more clearly promote Council’s involvement in the regional Guringai Festival.

 

Arts, Culture and Diversity Focus: Autumn Harmony

 

Month of March

 

Coincides with Art Month, Harmony Day and International Women’s Day. Autumn Harmony provides an opportunity to promote best practice in cultural programming for diverse audiences and foster partnerships with creative agencies.

 

Indigenous Focus: Guringai Festival

 

Late May (Sorry Day) to early July (NAIDOC Week)

 

This regional festival provides an opportunity to promote events – held in Lane Cove and across the North Shore - that celebrate Aboriginal heritage and culture.

 

Community Development Focus: Cameraygal Festival

 

August – October

 

Lane Cove’s community-based Festival features events contributed by 30+ local community groups. It runs over nine weeks from August through to October with an emphasis on events that complement the Festivals’ chosen theme. The aim is to build the opportunity for residents to connect with the local community by running a series of events that profile the work of community and cultural organisations.

 

Creative exploration of Open Space: Sunset in the Village

 

December – January

 

Originally beginning as a twilight program of events in Lane Cove Plaza in conjunction with the Lane Cove Chamber of Commerce, Sunset in the Village has been identified as the Festival with the most potential for development. The 2013/14 program not only encompassed Channukah, Christmas events and Australia Day but due to timing also included Lunar New Year. In addition to these signature events, local parks and reserves were used to provide venues for twilight movie screenings at Burns Bay Reserve, Riverview and Bob Campbell Oval, Greenwich as well as a Saturday Sounds event at Tambourine Bay Reserve. Council staff also recognised the opportunity to promote local facilities such as popular picnic spots, bike tracks and self-guided tours.  

 

Increasing Use of Spaces Outside the Village

 

Over the past 12 months Council’s festival programs have promoted the use of community facilities and recreational spaces outside of Lane Cove Village. For example, in the Sunset in the Village 2013/14 program there was an Outdoor Activities section profiling local cycle routes through areas such as Longueville, Greenwich and Linley Point. It also listed popular picnic and BBQ locations and encouraged visitors to Carisbrook House and Greenwich Baths.

 

Council-run events in the upcoming Cameraygal Festival are being held at Burns Bay Reserve and Aquatic Park as well as the popular boat trip along Lane Cove River. The boat trip combines local and natural history information run in conjunction with Local Studies and Bush Care teams.

 


Timing

 

In addition to these Council-run festivals, a number of other cultural activities and major events run alongside the hundreds of events run by Council staff. In summary, an overview of key timings are:-

 

·    January – Australia Day + Sunset in the Village Festival events;

·    February – Lunar New Year;

·    March – Harmony Day + Autumn Harmony Festival;

·    April – ANZAC Day + School Holiday Activities in Plaza;

·    May – Children’s Voices for Reconciliation (part of Guringai Festival);

·    June – N/A;

·    July – School Holiday Activities + NAIDOC Week (part of Guringai Festival);

·    August – Art Award + Cameraygal Festival;

·    September – Cameraygal Festival;

·    October – Lane Cove Village Fair + Cameraygal Festival;

·    November – Kaleidoscope of Lane Cove + Remembrance Day+ Melbourne Cup+ Coffee/Barista Festival; and

·    December – Chanukah, Lighting of the Christmas Tree, Light Up Lane Cove Christmas Street Lights Competition + Sunset in the Village Festival events.

 

Throughout the year Council also runs Screen on the Green events and regular Plaza performances via the Saturday Sounds series.

 

Outside of Council some other foreshore events taking place include:-

 

·    January – Parramatta river foreshore events held as part of Sydney Festival;

·    February – Dragon Boat races as part of Chinese New Year in the City;

·    May – North Sydney involved in Vivid Sydney;

·    July – Hunters’ Hill Harbour Sculpture program; and

·    September – Ryde Rivers Festival.

 

Involving Community Groups

 

Building on the support of the community-development model used for the Cameraygal Festival, community groups have been invited to contribute events to the Sunset in the Village and Autumn Harmony programs in recent years. Almost all groups who have submitted an event have been listed in the event programs resulting in large program guides and less targeted events.

 

Over the past 12 months the emphasis has been on framing the Cameraygal Festival as the flagship Festival using the community-based model. A number of community groups affiliated with the Lane Cove and Parramatta River Foreshore already participate in the Cameraygal Festival such as Greenwich Sailing Club and North Shore Rowing.

 

Discussion

 

Lane Cove has an affinity with its water vistas and activities taking place on Lane Cove River and Parramatta River Foreshore.

 

Due to the less convenient public transport access, parking and capacity of local amenities, Council staff have been mindful of the ability to host large scale community events along popular river-side locations.

 


It is suggested that rather than introducing a new stand-alone Festival, that the suggested activities are incorporated into a Sunset in the Village Festival, which would run from January to February, 2015.

 

This creates an opportunity to consider the feasibility of Dragon Boat races to coincide with Lunar New Year; the Riverview Gold Cup; and events at Greenwich Baths.

 

The finer programming of a particular date or structure for the activities will be considered following an invitation for local community groups to provide feedback on a format most relevant to their activities.

 

To ensure that Sunset in the Village maintains a clear distinction from the Cameraygal Festival format it is suggested that organisations affiliated with the River are invited to submit events for consideration with Council staff having the discretion to accept events which are most strongly aligned with the objective of promoting the river foreshores.

 

By aligning the river programs with the Sunset in the Village program it will also provide an avenue to utilise open space for community activities during the warmer months. These could be included a section of the program entitled ‘By the River’.

 

Conclusion

 

Given the number of festivals and signature events taking place throughout the year, it is proposed that river focused events should take place during Sunset in the Village. This provides a link to existing cultural activities and community events with the opportunity to enhance with new activities developed with local organisations.

 

Council staff will give further thought to potential locations and refine timings in consultation with local community groups and work towards delivery in the 2015 Sunset in the Village program. This would begin as a trial of some events in the upcoming Sunset in the Village program with a view that the scale could increase in 2016 with the appropriate budget and logistics based on its exploration this February.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council trial the inclusion of a “By the River” program within the Sunset in the Village Festival.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Gornall

Executive Manager - Human Services

Human Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 August 2014

Local Government Conference NSW 2014

 

 

Subject:          Local Government Conference NSW 2014    

Record No:    SU1915 - 43208/14

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Kirsty Fleming 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council has received correspondence from Local Government NSW concerning their Annual Conference.  In preparation for the Conference, Local Government NSW have asked all councils to consider the key issues affecting its community.  These issues will be discussed and debated during the business sessions of the Conference.  This report recommends that Council give consideration to its top 3-5 issues and endorse the delegates including the four (4) voting delegates for the Conference.

 

Discussion

 

The Annual Conference of Local Government NSW (LGNSW) will be held from 19-21 October 2014 at Coffs Harbour Ex-Services Club.  As the date of the Conference clashes with the Ordinary Council Meeting scheduled for Monday, 20 October 2014 it is proposed to amend the meeting date to Monday, 13 October 2014. 

 

A Draft Program for the Conference is shown attached as AT-1.  Councils have been requested to identify issues or motions relating to the following overall categories:-

1.    Industrial relations and employment - Industrial relations and employment related legislation, awards and rates of pay, WHS and worker compensation compliance, human resources, training and development, skills shortages, staff attraction, retention and productivity, employment security, workplace change, Code of Conduct, leadership and management capacity, capability framework and council governance;

2.    Economic - Own source revenue (e.g. rates, fees, charges etc.), intergovernmental fiscal relations (e.g. grants, cost shifting etc.), financial management and governance including long term financial planning and asset management, financial sustainability, economic policy, local and regional economic development, transport, Local Water Utilities, stormwater and floodplain infrastructure, other infrastructure and disaster management and recovery;

3.    Environmental - Land use planning, ecologically sustainable development, waste management, natural resource management, protection of local, regional and state natural environments, biosecurity and weeds management, pollution prevention, environmental risk management through reduction of hazards and pollutants and remediation/rehabilitation of degraded environments, climate change mitigation and adaptation, and responsible resource consumption and conservation; and

4.    Governance/ Civic Leadership - Local Government legislative and regulatory settings, corporate, structural reform, Local Government elections, participation, and policies and programs of other spheres of government that impact on Local Government governance or citizen involvement in local democracy.

 


The following issues have been identified by staff as Council’s key issues:-

 

Planning for Schools

 

With the NSW Government’s Policy Direction of increasing density within Sydney, emphasis needs to be placed on essential infrastructure to adequately cope with the increased number of residents in suburbs experiencing growth, particularly areas such as Lane Cove that are attracting families with school aged children.  Lane Cove is expected to have in excess of 4,000 new dwellings by 2031.  Pressure is already placed on the current primary schools in the area and this is expected to increase as the number of children in Lane Cove increases.  New schools or expanded schools need to be planned in conjunction with Council.

 

The planning needs to not only address the physical classrooms for the greater population but also the increased need for sporting fields and green space. Attention also needs to be given to traffic and associated issues.  Lane Cove children also need to travel outside the Local Government Area to attend State high schools and there needs to be some planning about the provision of new high schools to cope with the increased density on the lower North Shore. 

 

It is therefore proposed to submit a motion to LGNSW seeking the NSW Government to adequately plan, in conjunction with councils, the provision of new schools in areas experiencing growth particularly areas attracting families with school aged children. 

 

Provision of Before and After School Facilities in Lane Cove

 

Out of School Hours Care provision is essential for many working families.  Experience has proved that most parents are happiest when the service is delivered on the school site, ensuring that the children are cared for in a safe environment that is familiar to the children and their families. Lane Cove, in line with most lower north shore areas, is facing a critical shortage of this kind of care.  While some schools have been active in increasing the numbers of children attending, others have found the issues too difficult.

The Department of Education, who administer the regulations for OOSH care should be assessing ways of better enabling the provision of these services. There urgently needs to be some strategic planning to better facilitate shared use of school classrooms for out-of-hours care.  Multi-purpose use of school infrastructure was envisaged by Infrastructure NSW, and out-of-hours care is a good fit.  The problem is not just a social issue, but the lack of OOSH care facilities also affects parent participation in the workforce. It is therefore suggested that the Department of Education be requested to assess ways of increasing the availability of OOSH care facilities to support working families. Multi-purpose use of school infrastructure is seen as best fit.

Powers of the Joint Regional Planning Panel

In support of Council’s LEP which was developed in accordance with the NSW Standard LEP template, and in recognition of the significant efforts made by Council in consultation with the local community to prepare a plan appropriate to the local context while satisfying State residential targets, Council has subsequently sought to apply a policy of strict compliance with the LEP standards.  Council is only prepared to support a variation on the framework where there are unusual circumstances relating to site constraints.

The recent application by the Joint Regional Planning Panel of its current powers in relation to the determination of a staged development application setting out a concept proposal for residential flat buildings at Nos.2-22 Birdwood Avenue and 11-15 Finlayson Street, Lane Cove is of significant concern to Council. 

The development which does not comply with the Local Environmental Plan height and floor space ratio guidelines, was recommended for refusal by Council as thorough consideration of the planning issues by experienced planners identified no such circumstances as to merit significant variation from the LEP. 

 

The JRPP’s subsequent approval of the application is considered unjustified and provides an undesirable precedent for the application of LEPs across the State. The JRPP’s power, unless curtailed, has potential consequences including the following:-

 

·     It seeks to prevail over, the power of the NSW Department of Planning to guide the orderly development of land within the State;

·     It is contrary to the intent of the Standard LEP of providing the community, including developers, with certainty as to development outcomes and the desired future character of precincts; and

·     It undermines Council’s policy of compliance which is based on the sound principle of providing equitable treatment for all property owners.

It is therefore proposed that the Minister be requested to prepare amendments to legislation, regulation and related policy to limit the powers of the Joint Regional Planning Panels to overturn a Council’s Local Environmental Plan in relation to Floor Space Ratio and Height in the absence of demonstrably valid reasons above public reproach.

 

Affordable Housing

 

It is considered that the existing Affordable Housing SEPP has not been effective in facilitating the provision of affordable housing within developments despite incentives such as extra floor space bonuses.  Therefore, it is suggested that the NSW Government be requested to review the Affordable Housing SEPP to include Affordable / Key Worker housing incentives that align with Council planning objectives.

 

Aged and Disability

 

Since 2013, Commonwealth and State Governments have been implementing changes to the way they provide funds to support the needs of older people and people with a disability.  The Commonwealth provides for people over 65 and the State Government through Ageing Disability and Home Care agencies of NSW Family and Community Services (ADHC).  Currently ADHC provides Council with funding to support the work of the Aged and Disability services, with the Senior Policy Officer Ageing and Disability at LGNSW also funded by ADHC. 

 

Advice has been received indicating funding is not guaranteed beyond 30 June 2015.  In view of the services and programs provided to an increasingly ageing population and those people with disabilities, it is recommended Council support representations guaranteeing ongoing funding for these vital support roles and services. 

 

Boarding Houses

 

Council has recently made representations to the NSW Minister for Planning to request the NSW Government to strengthen the SEPP (Affordable Rental Housing) 2009 in relation to Boarding Houses by:-

1.    Requiring Social Impact Assessments (SIA) for all development applications for boarding houses under the SEPP; and

2.    Prohibiting strata or community title subdivisions of boarding houses

It is suggested that a motion be prepared for the Conference reflecting Council’s position on Boarding Houses.

 

Quorum

In 2012 Council raised concerns regarding changing the Constitution to allow for change in quorum for the former Local Government Association (LGA) Annual Conferences. In contacting Fair Work Australia it was established that the Constitution can be changed on approval from Fair Work Australia.

At that time the LGA Constitution stated:-

“The quorum for a Conference shall be fifty (50) percent of delegates and members of the Executive Committee to the Conference plus one (1). The business of a Conference shall not be conducted unless a quorum is present.”

This clause hindered the ability of those present at the Annual Conference business sessions in making decisions as even though delegates register their attendance at the Conference they were not always present at all business sessions making it difficult for a quorum to be achieved.  In order to ensure greater capacity to make decisions despite lower attendance levels it was suggested that amending the clause as follows would be appropriate:-

“The quorum for a Conference shall be fifty (50) percent of delegates and members of the Executive Committee to the Conference plus one (1). The business of a Conference shall not be conducted unless a quorum is present. Quorum shall be determined each morning from the delegates in attendance.”

Therefore it is proposed that LGNSW move to amend the provisions relating to the quorum at the Annual Conference and seek written approval from Fair Work Australia to change its Constitution to allow quorum to be determined each morning of the Conference.

 

Conclusion

 

In view of these above issues, it will therefore be recommended that Council give consideration to its 3-5 top issues affecting the Lane Cove Community and refer them to the Local Government NSW for inclusion on the 2014 Conference Agenda.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.         Council give consideration to its 3-5 top issues affecting the Lane Cove community to be submitted for discussion at the Local Government NSW Annual Conference on 19-21 October 2014;

2.         Council authorise delegates to attend the Conference including Council’s four (4) voting delegates; and

3.         The Ordinary Council Meeting scheduled for Monday, 20 October be brought forward to Monday, 13 October 2014 and the Councillor Workshop be held on Tuesday, 7 October 2014.

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Local Government NSW Annual Conference - Draft Program 2014

2 Pages

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 August 2014

Tender for Miscellaneous Trade and General Services - Civil Works, Open Space Services and Traffic Services

 

 

Subject:          Tender for Miscellaneous Trade and General Services - Civil Works, Open Space Services and Traffic Services    

Record No:    SU5402 - 43742/14

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Kirsty Fleming 

 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

As part of Council’s Preferred Supplier agreement process, Council called for tenders in accordance with the Tender and Quotation Procedure for the provision of a range of miscellaneous trade and general services for works categories including Civil Works, Open Space Services and Traffic Services.  The successful tenders will be included on Council’s Preferred Supplier Panel for a term of up to 3 years.      

 

This report provides details on the tender process conducted and lists those service providers recommended for appointment to the panel to carry out the specified trade and general services in accordance with the technical specifications developed for the tender.

 

Background

 

From 2010 Council has undertaken a quotations process every two (2) years to select a range of service providers to appoint to a preferred supplier panel.  The panel includes a range of service categories from open space services like tree lopping and bush regeneration to civil works such as concreting and construction works, line marking and other consultancy and engineering services.  This strategic procurement process allows Council to conduct market testing, secure best value offers in the purchase of goods and services and ensure consistency in the delivery of goods and services to Council and the community.  

 

The process was last undertaken in 2012 with agreements covering up to 30 June 2014.  In approaching the process again this year, Council engaged consultants from Local Government Procurement (LGP) to assist in reviewing the process to ensure best practice.  Some of the initial measures implemented as a result of this review included:-

·          Extending the service period to include an additional 12 month option thus allowing for a term of up to three (3) years;

·          Conducting a thorough review of Council’s specification documentation;

·          Implementing a more structured evaluation process; and

·          Utilising an electronic procurement system (Tenderlink) to advertise and assist in managing the process.

 

Furthermore, as part of this review an analysis of Council’s spend by supplier over the previous contract period, was undertaken.  This identified that in some cases total cost accumulation for the period reached the tender threshold for procurement of $150,000.  As such, all service categories where it was considered feasible for Council’s spend with its preferred suppliers to exceed this threshold over the 3 year contract period were identified and tenders were called for these services. 

 

To allow sufficient time to efficiently implement the tender process all existing contracts for Council’s current service providers for these categories were extended to 1 September 2014.

 


Discussion

 

Tenders for the following trade and general services were invited by the open tender on Tuesday 10 June 2014:-

 

Civil & Infrastructure Works

 

·      Concrete and Footpaths Works

 

·      Concrete Pumping Services

 

·      Disposal of Construction Materials

 

·      Excavation And Demolition Services / Large Equipment Hire

 

·      Geotechnical Engineering Services

 

·      Linemarking and Associated Works

 

·      Raw Construction Materials

 

·      Structural Engineering Services

 

·      Surveying Services

Open Space Services

 

·      Bushland Regeneration

 

·      Tree Lopping / Removal

 

·      Stump Grinding

 

·      Walking Track and Boardwalk Construction and Maintenance

Traffic  Services

 

·      Traffic Modelling

 

·      Traffic Signal Design

 

·      Traffic, Transport and Parking Advisory Services

           

Council advertised the tender in the Sydney Morning Herald Tuesday 10th June 2014 as well as through Tenderlink and on Council’s website.  Tenders closed at 2:00pm on Tuesday 8th July 2014. 

Council received 67 submissions.  One (1) submission was found to be non conforming, as no pricing schedule was tendered, and was excluded from further consideration.  The tender specification prepared for these service categories outlined that the tender submissions would be assessed based on the following criteria:-

 

Mandatory Criteria

·          Completion of price schedules in the format requested;

·          Completion of all returnable schedules;

·          Submission of the tender by the specified closing date and time;

·          Trade Certificates and Licences - All Suppliers and Subcontractors must have all current certificates and licences associated with the category of work to be completed;

·          Insurances - All Suppliers and Subcontractors must hold and keep current all relevant Insurances;

·          Accreditation with BNG Contracting Services Pty Ltd – All Suppliers must agree to registration and accreditation with Council’s risk assessor if successful;

·          Provision of references; and

·          Acknowledgement of commitment to act in accordance with Council’s Code of Conduct and Statement of Business Ethics.

 

Weighted Criteria

(a)          Pricing (40%)

·                  Best value to Council; and

·                  Assessment involved the identification of all relevant costs, including individual analysis of costing contained in each Tender submission, and cost comparisons between all competing submissions, with initial (once only) and ongoing costs being differentiated and evaluated where applicable.

(b)          Capacity & Capability (20%)

·                  Technical expertise of the Tenderer and key personnel and the extent of skills/qualifications of the people who will be engaged to carry out the contractor's obligations under the Contract;

·                  Structure of the Organisation;

·                  Resources available to provide the services in a timely manner to Council;

·                  Past record and/or demonstrated ability to provide good/services;

·                  Contingency plans in place and how they will be activated to ensure uninterrupted supply; and

·                  Capability of the Tenderer to work within relevant policy frameworks and applicable legislation including WH&S regulations.

(c)          Experience (20%) 

·                  Experience of the Tenderer and its personnel, including management and supervision;

·                  The experience of any sub-contractors to be used;

·                  Relevant industry experience;

·                  Demonstrated experience in the provision of goods and services to the local government sector; and

·                  Positive reference checks

(d)          Service Delivery (15%)

·                  Key competitive areas and initiatives;

·                  Value adding offers; and

·                  Proposed methods of service delivery including:-

o    Continuous improvement

o    Quality Assurance Systems and Procedures

(e)           Environment and Sustainability (5%)

Refers to the manner in which environmental issues are to be appropriately addressed, including commitment to due diligence and the principles of ecologically sustainable development (ESD) in regard to environmental legislation and documentation outlining past performance in regard to environment protection and enhancement initiatives. This was assessed based on the:-

·                  Response to Council’s Environmental Questionnaire; and

·                  Details of environmental policies and procedures provided.

 


All tenders have been scrutinised and assessed by tender evaluation panels consisting of the following Council staff:-

 

Civil & Infrastructure Works

·          Acting Manager – Governance;

·          Manager – Civic Service; and

·          Manager – Assets.

 

Open Space Services

·          Acting Manager – Governance;

·          Manager – Open Space; and 

·          Assistant Manager – Bushland. 

 

Traffic Services

·          Executive Manager – Corporate Services; and

·          Manager – Traffic. 

 

The Tender Assessment Panel utilised a scoring method in the assessment of the tenders.  Based on the quality of the offer, a numerical score out of 10 was allocated for each of the weighted assessment criteria.  Pre-determined weightings for each of the assessment criteria were then applied to the scores and the submissions were ranked to reveal those considered to best meet the requirements of the tender documentation in providing best value to Council.

 

Tenders were scored individually by each member of the Tender Assessment Panel and then averaged to provide the final score / ranking.  The tables below summarise the results of the tender assessment with the preferred supplier/s in bold.

 

Civil and Infrastructure Works

 

Concrete and Footpaths Works & Concrete Pumping Services

Company

 

Kelbon

Equally  Preferred

Get Civil

Equally  Preferred

Sam the Paving Man

Equally  Preferred

CW Concrete

Equally  Preferred

Stateline Asphalt

Equally  Preferred

Rockpave Civil Pty Ltd

 

MSA Civil and Communications

 

KK Civil Engineering

 

Performance Civil Holdings

 

Anzellotti Constructions Pty Ltd

 

Kodi Civil

 

Avant Construction

 

Ally Property Services (Ally Civil)

 

OzGroup Constructions

 

Mansour Paving

 

Hargraves

 

 

Disposal of Construction Materials

Company

 

Benedict Recycling

Equally  Preferred

Veljohn Pty Ltd

Equally  Preferred

Eminent Waste Pty Ltd

Equally  Preferred

Mansour Paving

 

Performance Civil Holdings

 

Kodi Civil

 

OzGroup Constructions

 

Rockpave Civil Pty Ltd

 

CW Concrete

 

MSA Civil and Communications

 

Ally Property Services (Ally Civil)

 

Hargraves

 

Avant Construction

 

 

Excavation And Demolition Services / Large Equipment Hire

Company

Rank

Rockpave Civil Pty Ltd

Preferred

Kodi Civil

 

CW Concrete

 

Bedrule (T/A TOBCO)

 

Eminent Waste Pty Ltd

 

Sam the Paving Man

 

Anzellotti Constructions Pty Ltd

 

Avant Construction

 

Mansour Paving

 

MSA Civil and Communications

 

Hargraves

 

OzGroup Constructions

 

Performance Civil Holdings

 

Ally Property Services (Ally Civil)

 

 

Geotechnical Engineering Services

Company

Rank

SMEC Testing Services Pty Ltd

Equally  Preferred

JK Geotechnics

Equally  Preferred

Michael Adler and Associates

Equally  Preferred

Asset Geotechnical Engineering Pty Ltd

 

CW Concrete

 

Performance Civil Holdings

 

Avant Construction

 

Hargraves

 

 

Linemarking and Associated Works

Company

Rank

Complete Line Marking

Equally  Preferred

Workforce Road Services

Equally  Preferred

J & M Schembri

Equally  Preferred

Avant Construction

 

Performance Civil Holdings

 

Hargraves

 

 

Raw Construction Materials

Company

Rank

Veljohn Pty Ltd

Preferred

Hargraves

 

Avant Construction

 

Performance Civil Holdings

 

CW Concrete

 

OzGroup Constructions

 

Mansour Paving

 

 

Structural Engineering Services

Company

Rank

Craig & Rhodes

Equally  Preferred

Neilly Davis

Equally  Preferred

CW Concrete

 

Hargraves

 

Avant Construction

 

Performance Civil Holdings

 

 

Surveying Services

Company

Rank

Geosurv

Equally  Preferred

Craig & Rhodes

Equally  Preferred

Elite Survey

Equally  Preferred

Land Partners Limited

 

Hargraves

 

Performance Civil Holdings

 

CW Concrete

 

Avant Construction

 

Mansour Paving

 

OzGroup Constructions

 

Lawrence Group

 

 


Open Space Services

 

Bush Regeneration

Company

Rank

Lane Cove Bush Regenerators

Equally  Preferred

Bandicoot Bush Regeneration

Equally  Preferred

Waratah Eco Works

Equally  Preferred

Dragonfly Environmental

Equally  Preferred

Apunga Ecological Management

Equally  Preferred

Nation Trust Australia (NSW)

Equally  Preferred

Total Earth Care

Equally  Preferred

Toolijooa Pty Ltd

Equally  Preferred

Bush It

Equally  Preferred

Skyline Landscape Services

 

The Gardenmakers

 

Plateau Tree Services

 

Prime Facility and Asset Management

 

Hargraves

 

 

Tree Services

Company

Rank

Plateau Tree Services

Primary

Enviro Frontier Pty Ltd

Secondary

Australian Urban Tree Services

3rd Preference

CJ Murphy Tree Recycling Services

4th Preference

Skyline Landscape Services

 

The Gardenmakers

 

Hargraves

 

 

Walking Track & Boardwalk Construction & Maintenance

Company

Rank

Total Earth Care

Primary

Australian Bushland Construction

Secondary

Toolijooa Pty Ltd

3rd Preference

The Gardenmakers

4th Preference

Waratah Eco Works

 

Hargraves

 

 


Traffic Services

 

Traffic Modelling

Company

Rank

Transport Modellers Alliance Pty Ltd

Equally Preferred

AECOM Australia Pty Ltd

Equally Preferred

Bitzios Consulting

Equally Preferred

PeopleTrans Pty Ltd

 

GTA Consultants

 

Transport and Urban Planning

 

JJ Ryan Consulting Pty Ltd

 

TTM Traffic consulting Pty Ltd

 

Parking Traffic Consultants Pty Ltd

 

Trans-Plant Training Pty Ltd

 

 

Traffic Signal Design

Company

Rank

Transport and Urban Planning

Equally Preferred

AECOM Australia Pty Ltd

Equally Preferred

TTM Traffic Consulting Pty Ltd

 

Bitzios Consulting

 

PeopleTrans Pty Ltd

 

JJ Ryan Consulting Pty Ltd

 

GTA Consultants

 

Transport Modellers Alliance Pty Ltd

 

Parking Traffic Consultants Pty Ltd

 

Trans-Plant Training Pty Ltd

 

 


Traffic, Transport and Parking Advisory Services

Company

Rank

TTM Traffic Consulting Pty Ltd

Equally Preferred

AECOM Australia Pty Ltd

Equally Preferred

Bitzios Consulting

Equally Preferred

Positive Traffic

Equally Preferred

Transport Modellers Alliance Pty Ltd

 

Transport and Urban Planning

 

JJ Ryan Consulting Pty Ltd

 

GTA Consultants

 

Parking Traffic Consultants Pty Ltd

 

PeopleTrans Pty Ltd

 

Trans-Plant Training Pty Ltd

 

 


Conclusion

A confidential memorandum has been circulated separately to Councillors detailing the prices submitted by each tenderer and how each of the weighted criteria was assessed.

It is recommended that Council accept the following tenders and authorise appointment of those suppliers to Council’s Preferred Supplier Panel for a contract term of two (2) years, plus one option to extend for a further duration of one (1) year, subject to performance:- 

Civil & Infrastructure Works

Service

Recommended Service Providers

Concrete and Footpaths Works  & Concrete Pumping Services

Kelbon

Get Civil

Sam the Paving Man

CW Concrete

Stateline Asphalt

Disposal of Construction Materials

Benedict Recycling

Veljohn Pty Ltd

Eminent Waste Pty Ltd

Excavation And Demolition Services / Large Equipment Hire

Rockpave Civil Pty Ltd

Geotechnical Engineering Services

SMEC Testing Services Pty Ltd

JK Geotechnics

Michael Adler and Associates

Linemarking and Associated Works

Complete Line Marking

Workforce Road Services

J & M Schembri

Raw Construction Materials

Veljohn Pty Ltd

Structural Engineering Services

Craig & Rhodes

Neilly Davis

Surveying Services

Geosurv

Craig & Rhodes

Elite Survey

Open Space Services

Bushland Regeneration

 

 

Lane Cove Bush Regenerators

Bandicoot Bush Regeneration

Waratah Eco Works

Dragonfly Environmental

Apunga Ecological Management

Nation Trust Australia (NSW)

Total Earth Care

Toolijooa Pty Ltd

Bush It

Tree Lopping / Removal &

Stump Grinding

Plateau Tree Services (Primary)

Enviro Frontier Pty Ltd (Secondary)

Australian Urban Tree Services ^

CJ Murphy Tree Recycling Services ^

Walking Track and Boardwalk Construction and Maintenance

Total Earth Care (Primary)

Australian Bushland Construction (Primary)

Toolijooa Pty Ltd ^

The Gardenmakers ^

Traffic  Services

 

Traffic Modelling

Transport Modellers Alliance Pty Ltd

AECOM Australia Pty Ltd

Bitzios Consulting

Transport and Urban Planning

Traffic Signal Design

AECOM Australia Pty Ltd

TTM Traffic Consulting Pty Ltd

Traffic, Transport and Parking Advisory Services

AECOM Australia Pty Ltd

Bitzios Consulting

Positive Traffic

 

^           To be appointed as alternates to the panel but will only be required to register with BNG Conserve in the event that the primary suppliers are unable to complete work required by Council

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council:-

1.         Accept the following tenders and authorise appointment of those suppliers to Council’s Preferred Supplier Panel for a contract term of two (2) years, plus one option to extend for a further duration of one (1) year, subject to performance:-

Civil & Infrastructure Works

Service

Recommended Service Providers

Concrete and Footpaths Works  & Concrete Pumping Services

Kelbon

Get Civil

Sam the Paving Man

CW Concrete

Stateline Asphalt

Disposal of Construction Materials

Benedict Recycling

Veljohn Pty Ltd

Eminent Waste Pty Ltd

Excavation And Demolition Services / Large Equipment Hire

Rockpave Civil Pty Ltd

Geotechnical Engineering Services

SMEC Testing Services Pty Ltd

JK Geotechnics

Michael Adler and Associates

Linemarking and Associated Works

Complete Line Marking

Workforce Road Services

J & M Schembri

Raw Construction Materials

Veljohn Pty Ltd

Structural Engineering Services

Craig & Rhodes

Neilly Davis

Surveying Services

Geosurv

Craig & Rhodes

Elite Survey

Open Space Services

Bushland Regeneration

 

 

Lane Cove Bush Regenerators

Bandicoot Bush Regeneration

Waratah Eco Works

Dragonfly Environmental

Apunga Ecological Management

Nation Trust Australia (NSW)

Total Earth Care

Toolijooa Pty Ltd

Bush It

Tree Lopping / Removal &

Stump Grinding

Plateau Tree Services (Primary)

Enviro Frontier Pty Ltd (Secondary)

Australian Urban Tree Services

CJ Murphy Tree Recycling Services

Walking Track and Boardwalk Construction and Maintenance

Total Earth Care (Primary)

Australian Bushland Construction (Primary)

Toolijooa Pty Ltd

The Gardenmakers

Traffic  Services

 

Traffic Modelling

Transport Modellers Alliance Pty Ltd

AECOM Australia Pty Ltd

Bitzios Consulting

Transport and Urban Planning

Traffic Signal Design

AECOM Australia Pty Ltd

TTM Traffic Consulting Pty Ltd

Traffic, Transport and Parking Advisory Services

AECOM Australia Pty Ltd

Bitzios Consulting

Positive Traffic

2.              Delegate to the General Manager the authority to finalise and execute the contract and any other documentation required to give effect to this resolution.

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 August 2014

Local Traffic Committee Meeting held on 15 July 2014

 

 

Subject:          Local Traffic Committee Meeting held on 15 July 2014    

Record No:    SU1326 - 43986/14

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Sashika Young 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The Lane Cove Traffic Committee Meeting was held on Tuesday, 15 July 2014.  The Agenda is included as AT-1.  The Traffic Committee recommendations are shown in the Minutes of the Meeting, included as AT-2.

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council adopt the recommendations of the Lane Cove Traffic Committee Meeting held on Tuesday, 15 July 2014.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wayne Rylands

Executive Manager

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

AGENDA - Traffic Committee -15 July 2014

14 Pages

 

AT‑2 View

MINUTES - Traffic Committee - 15 July 2014

9 Pages

 

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 August 2014

Timebanking Volunteer Program

 

 

Subject:          Timebanking Volunteer Program    

Record No:    SU129 - 45338/14

Division:         Human Services Division

Author(s):      Carol Sinclair 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Timebanking is a form of volunteering that the NSW Office of Communities, Department of Education and Communities is investing in throughout the State. A 13 month trial was held in Newcastle and the Central Coast and concluded in December 2013. Initially 14 pilot sites were part of the trial.  The Department hopes to have 64 sites (communities) by the end of 2014. An evaluation was undertaken by the University of Newcastle and the University of Wollongong in March this year.  Council has been invited to participate in this program.

 

Background

 

Timebanking is a web-based program where people register and then log on to the Timebanking website and either offer a service they are willing to do for someone else or to find somebody who will provide the type of service they are looking for.  It is a community currency system where members trade volunteer services (counted as hours of time) with one another.

 

Every hour a person volunteers is counted as a credit.  Everyone’s time is valued as equal regardless of the type of work they perform. For every hour spent helping someone the contributor is entitled to one hour help in return. This does not have to be from the person they helped but can be spent using services provided from anyone in the program. For example, a person could provide two hours of child minding for one person and spend those 2 credits getting help from a graphic designer to develop business cards for a new business.

 

The trial program saw 4,004 people register and make 1,261 trades resulting in 8,000 banked hours, the equivalent of 322 days of volunteering.  There were 227 people offering volunteer services, 136 people requesting support and 52 offering and seeking support. 

 

Discussion

 

In the six months following the above trial the NSW Minister for Citizenship and Communities, Victor Dominello has launched 30 new Timebanking communities and plans to invite a further  20 communities to join the program by the end of 2014. Council has been invited to join this program.

 

The Timebanking program would be of benefit to the residents of Lane Cove.  Not only are there a large number of people who are willing to volunteer their time, skills and expertise, there are a large number of people who need support and assistance. A great benefit of this program is that the types of assistance a person requires does not have to fall within the parameters of funded volunteer programs. It can be flexible and innovative and can cater to what the person actually needs rather than what they ‘can have’ through more formal volunteer services.

 

This program would not have an adverse effect on community organisations already using volunteers as it has been found that the program tends to attract a different kind of volunteer and  people who do not participate in the traditional and existing forms of volunteering. For instance, newly retired people or people working part time who wish to offer their commercial and professional skills.

 

The program would align to Council’s Community Strategic Plan to coordinate and promote opportunities for community members to participate in their community through volunteer work”. The commitment from Council is relatively small (less than 1-2 hours each week) and would be the responsibility of the Community Development Officer, Seniors and Disability Services. Promotion for the program would be via the Council website on the Volunteer page, the senior’s newsletter ‘The Lane Cove Connection’, various e-newsletters and Council newsletters, information sent to Community groups and the Library. Examples of how Timebanking have a positive effect on people’s lives can be found at http://www.volunteering.nsw.gov.au/volunteers/timebanking.

 

Conclusion

 

The Timebanking program developed and supported by the NSW Office of Communities, would be of value to the community.  It provides a vehicle where people can connect with their community reducing feelings of isolation and add extra value to their lives, and the lives of others.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council accept the offer of NSW Office of Communities to join the Timebanking Program as developed by the Office of Communities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Gornall

Executive Manager - Human Services

Human Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Timebanking Trial Evaluation Summary

2 Pages

 

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 August 2014

Endorsement of the Local Government NSW Approach to Support the Continued Funding of Aged and Disability Officer Positions

 

 

Subject:          Endorsement of the Local Government NSW Approach to Support the Continued Funding of Aged and Disability Officer Positions    

Record No:    SU129 - 45357/14

Division:         Human Services Division

Author(s):      Carol Sinclair 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Since 2012 the Commonwealth and NSW Governments have been implementing changes to the way they provide funds to support the needs of older people and people with disabilities. People over the age of 65 are now supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Department of Health and people under 65 are supported by Ageing Disability and Home Care, the NSW Family and Community Services (ADHC).  This transition will be completed by 2016. Currently ADHC provides funding to Council to support the work of the Aged and Disability Services.  The Senior Policy Officer Ageing and Disability at LGNSW is also funded by ADHC.  Council has been advised that this funding is not guaranteed after 30 June 2015.

 

Discussion

 

In a letter dated 8 July 2014, Cr Keith Rhoades AFSM, President, Local Government NSW wrote to all councils regarding the cessation of the funding after June 2015. Mr Rhoades stressed the importance of the Aged and Disability staff and also raised concern that the position of Senior Policy Officer Ageing and Disability with Local Government NSW may no longer be funded.

 

Regarding the importance of Ageing and Disability staff in Councils, Mr Rhoades wrote the following: “LGNSW considers that Ageing and Disability staff are critical to the local implementation of shared council and NSW Government priorities. They contribute to council strategic planning and social policy development, provide expert advice to council on issues affecting older people and people with disability and their carers, and ensure local and regional ageing and disability issues are incorporated into the planning and operations of councils.” 

 

LGNSW have prepared a submission for the Office for Ageing stressing the importance and necessity of the Aged and Disability Officers. This was based from a review of all Aged and Disability Officers in NSW that was conducted prior to the change in funding in 2011. This submission was prepared by the Senior Policy Officer Ageing and Disability from LGNSW. LGNSW are in the process of highlighting the need for continued funding for these roles, and the extension of the opportunity to receive such funding to all Council’s and seeks Council’s endorsement of this approach.

 

Since 2011 Council has received additional funding for Aged and Disability Services.  In 2010 the funding amount was $17,500 and this was increased to $51,500 in 2012.  A part time Activities Officer was employed with these funds to expand the work conducted by the Council funded Community Development Officer, Seniors and Disability Services position.

 

The ADHC funding has been critical to Council’s continued support for aged and disability services. In addition to funding of the part time Aged and Disability Activities Officer it has enabled the implementation and continuation of programs such as Tai Chi classes, cooking demonstrations, the Men’s Community Kitchen, the Friday morning bowls group, the Write to Wellness program, the Different Degrees Theatre ensemble weekly workshops and performances at the Concourse in the All the World’s a Stage production,  the Senior’s Week program and events, Mental Health Month activities, falls prevention classes, dancing classes, seminar programs, bus trips and excursions.

 

It has also freed up the time of the Community Development Officer, Aged and Disabilities Service to undertake other essential tasks such as reviewing Development Applications for access issues and DCP compliance, convening local area network meetings, participating in consultations for trends in service delivery models, liaising with State and Commonwealth government representatives,  organising large one-off community events and ongoing events, networking with local businesses and organisations to provide services in the community and producing the very popular seniors newsletter, ‘The Lane Cove Connection’.

 

As Council would be aware the number of people living in Lane Cove is expected to grow 6.6% by 2025 to 33,579 with the number of the people in the 65 years and over category is expected to increase 35.8% by 2025.  Currently there are 7,748 people over the age of 55 years living in Lane Cove, which equates to 24.5% of the population.

 

Council has just completed the necessary work to be admitted into the World Health Organisation Global Network of Age friendly Cities and Communities, the first Council to do so in NSW. The Aged and Disability Officers will be critical for rolling out this program as well as actions from the Commonwealth, State, Regional and NRSOC Ageing Strategies and implementing strategies that will arise from the forthcoming Disability Inclusion Bill.

 

Conclusion

 

Both the Senior Policy Officer Ageing and Disability, Local Government NSW and Council’s Aged and Disability Officers play a critical role in the lives of older people and people with disabilities in Lane Cove and efforts to secure continued funding will be of benefit not only to these particular groups but to all members of the Lane Cove community.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council writes to:-

 

1.         LGNSW expressing concern about the possible loss of funding for the Aged and Disability Officers and the Senior Policy Officer Ageing and Disability at LGNSW and endorse the approach of highlighting the importance of continuing the funding of these positions within Councils;

 

2.         The Minister for Local Government, Minister for Ageing, Minister for Disability Services expressing concern about the withdrawal of funding and asking for reconsideration; and

 

3.         The Local Member, the Hon. Anthony Roberts MP, expressing concern about the withdrawal of funding and asking for his support in preventing the funding from being withdrawn.

 

Jane Gornall

Executive Manager - Human Services

Human Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Letter from Local Government NSW to the Mayor regarding Funding for Ageing and Disability Positions in Councils

1 Page

 

AT‑2 View

Report on Ageing and Disability Positions in NSW Councils - The need for continued Funding July 2014

11 Pages

 

 

  


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 August 2014

Street Parties in Lane Cove

 

 

Subject:          Street Parties in Lane Cove    

Record No:    SU4985 - 45431/14

Division:         Human Services Division

Author(s):      Corinne Dickinson 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report outlines Councils new information kit to support street parties being held as a community building activity. It is recommended Council receive and note the new information booklet.

 

Background

 

At its meeting of November 2013 Council resolved to provide assistance to members of the public seeking to hold street parties.  More specifically, Council committed to dedicate a section of its website for the purpose of providing information, planning advice and appropriate forms for residents seeking to host a street party.  This included the provision of assistance to those members of the public required to complete the Traffic Management Plan template and, for events at Christmas, seek to provide Public Liability Insurance through Council. 

 

As a result Council has revised its Local Road Closure for Street Party Application Form and made plans to dedicate a page to Street Parties on Council’s new website.  In addition Council has identified the opportunity to provide a guide to Street Parties through the Love Where You Live project. This identifies additional resources available to residents to help facilitate street parties and reflects Council’s commitment to events that build neighbourhood relationships.

 

Discussion

 

Currently the Council Policy for street parties applies only to local road closures. This is to address Council’s obligations to review the conditions of street parties held on local public roads, a process that cannot be altered due to Roads and Maritime Services requirements.

 

A Guide to Street Parties in Lane Cove has been developed to provide additional assistance to local residents looking to host street parties. The result is the provision of the following resources to Council-approved street parties on local roads at no cost to the organisers:-

 

·    240L waste and recycling bins;

·    Love Where You Live shade structures;

·    Love Where You Live invitations to assist with promotion;

·    Delivery of available signage from Council depot; and

·    Any mandatory advertising of road closure.

 

There is also the potential to provide Public Liability Insurance for some street parties under a new class of insurance from Council’s insurer United Independent Pools. This can be nominated by the event organiser at the time of application. Council can then seek additional information to determine if the activities are covered by Council’s insurance provider.

 

These new resources and advice on gaining approval for street parties has been detailed in the attached Guide to Street Parties in Lane Cove. It is proposed that a small number of these guides are made available at Council’s Civic Centre with the primary source of information (along with a copy of the guide) being included on Council’s new website under www.lanecove.nsw.gov.au/lovewhereyoulive

 


Conclusion

 

A Guide to Street Parties in Lane Cove provides residents with additional information on what is required for the organisation of street parties.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receive and note the Guide to Street Parties in Lane Cove produced to assist local residents in preparing for street parties in Lane Cove.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Gornall

Executive Manager - Human Services

Human Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

A Guide to Street Parties In Lane Cove

6 Pages

 

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 August 2014

4th Quarter Review of the 2013-14 Delivery Program and Operational Plan

 

 

Subject:          4th Quarter Review of the 2013-14 Delivery Program and Operational Plan    

Record No:    SU238 - 43060/14

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Kirsty Fleming 

 

 

Executive Summary

This report outlines the 4th Quarter progress towards achieving the projects listed in the adopted 2013-2014 Delivery Program and Operational Plan.  It is recommended that the report be received and noted.

Discussion

Council’s adopted 2013-2014 Delivery Program and Operational Plan details the projects proposed to be undertaken during the financial year in order to meet the goals and objectives of Lane Cove 2025 - Community Strategic Plan. Council reports quarterly on the progress towards completing the projects and achieving the targets for the adopted performance measurements. The 4th Quarter Review of the 2013-2014 Delivery Program and Operational Plan is shown attached as AT-1

 

The projects in the Quarterly Review are listed by the responsible Council Division and where the project has a completion date the ‘Action Status’ column graphically demonstrates the progress towards completion. The Review also includes a comment on the status of each project.

 

The Quarterly Review also provides a report on progress towards achieving the targets set for performance measurement for each Division of Council. A cumulative figure for performance measurement is shown so that performance can be tracked each quarter towards achieving the required target.

The highlights of the projects either commenced or completed for the 4th quarter include:-

·    The Consultation for the Age-Friendly Strategy was completed.  The Draft Action Plan and Community Summary Plan currently being reviewed (April);

·    Works commenced as part of the Kindy Cove refurbishment and Lane Cove Aquatic Centre upgrade (April);

·    Free hearing tests were offered at the Library (April);

·    Council’s Annual Captured Photography Competition for 2014 has been completed.  Over 100 entries were submitted and an awards night held for the competition was well attended (May);

·    Council entered into a Voluntary Planning Agreement with Meriton Property Services in relation to 150 Epping Rd which will see benefits inclduing the dedication of bushland, an infrastructure contribution, and community bus for the Lane Cove community (May);

·    2014-17 Draft Delivery Program and Operation Plan adopted by Council following public exhibition (May);

·    Council was announced as a finalist in the Local Government Arts & Culture Awards run by Local Government NSW for the Recycled Reindeer Project.  The reindeers were on display at the Local Government Awards evening at Parliament House (May);

·    The inaugural Lane Cove Literary Award was launched (May);

·    A survey was conducted seeking feedback from young people regarding Library resources (May – June);

·    Rosenthal Avenue Car Park redevelopment – specification for the Design Ideas Competition endorsed by Council and concept plans finalised for the retail and car park components of the project (April-June);

·    Commenced the early works package to redirect sewer and stormwater at the Little Lane Car Park site (June);

·    Council’s new web site was completed and went live (June);

·    The proposed allocation of funding for the 2014/2015 Financial Assistance Grants Program was placed on public exhibition (June);

·    Council Citizenship Awards program recognised 25 outstanding citizens, business and organisations at a presentation evening (June);

·    A Youth camp was held at The Great Aussie Bush Camp with 12 young people attending (June);

·    The public exhibition and community consultation for the Draft DCP Part R: Traffic, Transport and Parking was completed (June);

·    Construction commenced on the Birdwood Avenue and Little Street intersection improvement scheme (June); and

·    The formalised bush track upgrade was completed from Greenwich Sailing Club access road to Greenwich Baths (June).

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the 4th Quarter Review of the 2013-14 Delivery Program and Operational Plan be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

4th Quarter Review of 2013 - 2014 Operational Plan

89 Pages

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 August 2014

Council Snapshot

 

 

Subject:          Council Snapshot    

Record No:    SU220 - 45434/14

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):      Millie Stephen 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Attached for the information of Councillors is a review of Council’s recent activities, entitled Council Snapshot. This report provides a summary of the operations of each Division.

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receive and note the report.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Council Snapshot

43 Pages