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Agenda

Ordinary Council Meeting

18 November 2013

The meeting commences at 6.30pm. If members of the public are

not interested in any business recommended to be considered in

Closed Session or there is no such business, Council will ordinarily

  commence consideration of all other business at 7pm.

 


 

Notice of Meeting

 

Dear Councillors

 

Notice is given of the Ordinary Council Meeting, to be held in the Council Chambers on Monday 18 November 2013 commencing at 7:00pm. The business to be transacted at the meeting is included in this business paper.

 

Yours faithfully

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

 

Council Meeting Procedures

 

The Council meeting is chaired by the Mayor, Councillor David Brooks-Horn. Councillors are entitled to one vote on a matter. If votes are equal, the Chairperson has a second or casting vote. When a majority of Councillors vote in favour of a Motion it becomes a decision of the Council. Minutes of Council and Committee meetings are published on Council’s website www.lanecove.nsw.gov.au by 5pm on the Thursday following the meeting.

 

The Meeting is conducted in accordance with Council's Code of Meeting Practice. The order of business is listed in the Agenda on the next page. That order will be followed unless Council resolves to modify the order at the meeting. This may occur for example where the members of the public in attendance are interested in specific items on the agenda.

 

Members of the public may address the Council Meeting on any issue for a maximum of 3 minutes during the public forum which is held at the beginning of the meeting. All persons addressing the Meeting must speak to the Chair. Speakers and Councillors will not enter into general debate or ask questions.

 

If you do not understand any part of the information given above; require assistance to participate in the meeting due to a disability; or wish to obtain information in relation to Council, please contact Council’s Manager Governance on 99113525.

 

Please note meetings held in the Council Chambers are recorded on tape for the purposes of verifying the accuracy of minutes and the tapes are not disclosed to any third party under the Government Information (Public Access)  Act 2009, except as allowed under section 18(1) or section 19(1) of the PPIP Act, or where Council is compelled to do so by court order, warrant or subpoena or by any other legislation.

 

 

 


Ordinary Council 18 November 2013

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

APOLOGIES

 

 

OPENING OF MEETING WITH PRAYER

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT TO COUNTRY

 

NOTICE OF WEBCASTING OF MEETING

 

 

Public forum

 

Members of the public may address the Council Meeting on any issue for 3 minutes.

 

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

 

1.      ORDINARY COUNCIL MEETING - 21 OCTOBER 2013

 

 

Orders Of The Day

 

Notices of Motion

 

2.       Organising Street Parties

 

Officer Reports for Determination

 

3.       Temporary Parking Options - Lane Cove Village

 

4.       Lane Cove Plaza - Stage 2 Upgrade

 

5.       Longueville Road Intersection Improvement Scheme - Results of Community Consultation

 

6.       Little Lane Carpark Redevelopment  - Tender Assessment

 

7.       Development Control Plan Draft Amendment 6 - Battleaxe Blocks

 

8.       Review of Rating Structure

 

9.       Draft Street Tree Master Plan

 

10.     Green Roofs Research Project

 

11.     Lane Cove Traffic Committee Meeting held on Tuesday 15 October 2013

 

12.     1st Quarter Review of the 2013-2014 Budget

 

13.     New Boarding House Act 2012

 

14.     Results of Community Consultation on the Policy on Payment of Expenses and Facilities for Councillors

 

15.     Council's Annual Report 2012/13

 

Officer Reports for Information

 

16.     District Bushfire Risk Management Plan

 

17.     1st Quarter Review of the 2013-2014 Delivery Program & Operational Plan

 

18.     Council Snapshot   

 

 

 

 

                  


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 November 2013

Organising Street Parties

 

 

Subject:          Organising Street Parties    

Record No:    SU3109 - 58474/13

Division:         Lane Cove Council

Author(s):      Councillor Karola Brent 

 

 

Background

 

The current Street Parties & Parking Arrangements Policy was adopted by Council in October 2008. It successfully regulates temporary street road closures when requested by residents wishing to hold street parties, especially around Christmas. It, however, does not deal with several issues that would assist residents wanting to organise street parties and therefore foster neighbourhood communities. The existing policy reflects RMS guidelines that require a Traffic Management Plan, Traffic Committee approval and Traffic Management Services for streets which are not considered quiet local streets. It is appropriate Council do what it can, to assist with this worthwhile community building activity.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.   Council develop an online section of its website dedicated to assisting with the organisation of street parties, including information, planning advice and application forms where applicable;

 

2.   In this new section, Council create a Traffic Management Plan Template to assist the residents of those streets which require such plan by RMS regulations;

 

3.   Where a street party requires traffic management services, Council provide the service at cost utilising its own staff whenever available, and the cost be passed onto the street party applicants; and

 

4.   As part of Council’s larger efforts to facilitate community events in the spirit of Christmas, applications for street parties by private individuals, when all criteria and conditions are met, be sanctioned as Council's own events and not require separate Public Liability Insurance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor Karola Brent

Councillor

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

STREET PARTIES - TRAFFIC & PARKING ARRANGEMENTS POLICY

3 Pages

 

 

   


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 November 2013

Temporary Parking Options - Lane Cove Village

 

 

Subject:          Temporary Parking Options - Lane Cove Village    

Record No:    SU5218 - 56861/13

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Craig Dalli 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council at its October Meeting considered a report on temporary parking options during the

construction of the new 200 space public car park, community space and residential development on the existing Little Lane Car Park site.

 

As a result of concerns raised by the community, the matter was deferred to the November meeting for a further report to address a number of issues. This report will address the issues raised and include details of an amended option for a reduced capacity temporary 65 space car park for Pottery Green. It will be recommended that the amended option iii(a) be implemented comprising a smaller 65 space car park on Pottery Green which allows a full size sporting oval to be maintained together with the 12 spaces available upon the acquisition of 69 Longueville Road, Lane Cove.

 

Background

 

Tenders have been invited for the Little Lane redevelopment project and subject to agreement by the recommended tenderer (to be considered at a future meeting), works on site are anticipated to commence in February 2014, with the new car park expected to be operational in 12 months.

 

At present the Little Lane Car Park provides 86 car spaces that cater predominantly for the

Aquatic Centre, Pottery Green and the Village. Five options were submitted to the Council meeting on 21 October 2013 to provide a temporary replacement for the Little Lane Car Park. These were:-

 

i.    Temporary leasing of car spaces within the Oriel Building at 71 Longueville Road;

ii.    Construction of car spaces in Cox’s Lane;

iii.   Pottery Green – Temporary hard stand (gravel base) option;

iv.  Pottery Green – Temporary flooring hire option; and

v.   Temporary modular car park installed on the Council Chambers site.

 

A copy of the report to the October meeting is shown attached as AT-2.

 

Council staff recommended to the October meeting Option iii. which involved the provision of a temporary gravel base 164 space car park on approximately 50% or 4540m2 of the existing playing field within Pottery Green. This scale was proposed to not only replace the existing spaces but provide additional capacity for construction workers working on the Little Lane Car Park site and the Aquatic Centre, which will undergo gymnasium extensions and ceiling works, from March 2014.

 

At the Council meeting a number of concerns were raised about this option, in particular the

alienation of public open space, impact on the neighbourhood, impact on users, Council’s

legal basis to do the work and whether this would lead to a permanent or further use in

conjunction with the Rosenthal Car Park redevelopment.

 

As a result, Council at the October Meeting resolved to defer the matter to the next Council meeting and that the following information be included in a further report to Council:-

“a)   The impact on recreational users;

 b) The construction timetable for Blackman Park; and

c) The permissibility of the proposal under the current LEP.”

 

In terms of the impact on recreational users, in addition to passive users such a dog walking, fitness and ball games, the following local schools and sporting groups have bookings for Pottery Green. The table also indicates whether the use can continue under Option iii and the amended Option iii(a) which is outlined later in the report:-

 

School/Sporting Group

Usage

Booking Time(s)

Availability of use

Option iii

Option iii(a)

Lane Cove Public School

School sports

Fridays during school terms 1.30pm – 2.30pm

ü

ü

PSSA winter sports

Various

ü

ü

PSSA Cricket

Various

X

X

St Michaels School

School sports

Thursdays during school terms 11.30am – 1.30pm

ü

ü

Currambeena School

School sports

Five weeks during 2013 Tuesdays 1.30pm – 2.30pm

ü

ü

Greenwich Public School

School sports carnival

18 and 25 July 2013

ü

ü

North Shore Junior Cricket Association

Cricket

Saturday and Sundays from September to end of March

X

X

Lane Cove CATS AFL

Australian Rules

Monday afternoons 4pm  - 6pm March  - end of August

ü

ü

Lane Cove Football Club

Football (soccer)

Soccer training - various times Tuesday  - Thursday nights February to end of August

ü

ü

St Michaels Soccer Club

Football (soccer)

Soccer training - various times Wednesday and Thursday evenings – February to end of August

ü

ü

Rangers Soccer Club

Football (soccer)

Soccer training  - various times
February to end of August

ü

ü

Northern Suburbs Football Association

Football (soccer)

Competition matches -
Saturdays and Sundays February to end of August

X

ü

As a measure to minimise the impact on the above users of Pottery Green, an amended Option iii(a) for a smaller temporary car park on Pottery Green has been developed that provides for 65 car spaces, running East - West, which allows a full size sporting oval to be retained. This option, which is shown attached as AT-1, if selected by Council can also be utilised in conjunction with Option i. and/or a new option which involves the temporary use of 69 Longueville Road (corner of Epping Road – in front of the Oriel Building) as a 12 space car park, with Council now committed to purchasing the site from the Roads and Maritime Services (RMS), which will ultimately be used for a park.

 

In addressing the concerns raised, this new Option iii(a) initially provided for:-

 

1.   All existing uses and users of the oval to continue during the temporary use;

2.   A reduction of the traffic impacts on the neighbourhood, due to the reduced scale;

3.   Screening to be provided at the southern end of the car park to reduce headlight glare;

4.   The car park to operate 7am to 6pm, 7 days a week, and be time restricted;

5.   Additional parking on weekends to cover peak usage of the Aquatic Centre;

6.   Improved separation to the Occasional Child Care Centre; and

7.   Improved two way traffic flow in Phoenix Street by the temporary removal of the five spaces on the eastern side of Phoenix Street.


Advice of the amended option was hand delivered, posted or emailed to residents impacted by the proposal including those in the immediate vicinity of Pottery Green, members of the community who have raised concerns about the proposal and local schools and sporting groups who use the facility. It being noted that as at 11 November 2013, 60 letters and emails have been received in respect of the proposal, with the majority being general objections and others addressing specific issues. Some writers suggested measures to make the proposal more amenable. The specific issues are addressed below, with further amendments to Option iii (a) resulting. Additionally, a petition has been received containing 537 signatures opposing any form of car park on Pottery Green. Concurrently, a petition containing 1100 signatures (as at 11 November 2013) has been received by users of the Aquatic Centre in support of temporary car park options.

 

In relation to the submissions received, the major concern was about the safety of users of Pottery Green and in particular children. Option iii originally included a low height fence, however, to ensure there is greater separation between the car park and park users it is now proposed to erect a 1.8m high fence along the car park length. This will provide greater separation between the car park and the playing fields and to protect all park users. Gates will be erected at either end for emergency and maintenance access.

 

Other issues raised include, one submitter requesting speed humps be placed in Phoenix Street to reduce speed around the car park entry. This situation will be monitored and addressed should the proposed car park result in concerns about speed.

 

Another submission suggested Little Street become one way south bound to provide an increase in parking through angle parking being implemented on the western side of Little Street. Staff do not consider this a viable short term option as Little Lane will be subject to excavation during the Little Lane Development, (the car park extends under the road) and will therefore be open to traffic for access purposes only.

 

Council as a matter arising to the previous report resolved “that Council investigate the option of using the RMS land located on the corner of Longueville Road and Pacific Highway for car parking”. This was also suggested in one of the submissions. Enquiries have revealed that the RMS has completed remediating this site after its use as a depot during the Lane Cove tunnel construction , and is now preparing to sell the property, which is zoned R4 for units.

Another submission suggested Council staff be required to park at an alternate locations such as Blackman Park, with shuttle bus arrangements put in place. There is some confusion as to the parking provided by Council. 75% of the parking is required for Council vehicles which are used for operational purposes throughout the day.  The remaining is 8 stacked parking spaces (total sixteen spaces) provided for general staff parking. This option would prove expensive to provide 16 spaces and is not considered practical as staff commence and finish work at varying times.

 

The amended Option iii(a) accommodates passive uses and all of the above regular users of Pottery Green including sporting groups, with the exception of cricket. The North Shore Cricket Association have again confirmed they have capacity to relocate games to other venues during this period. The ground is not used for training purposes. Additionally, discussions have been held with Northern Suburbs Football Association, with it being noted that even though soccer can still be played on Pottery Green during the temporary period, additional capacity for playing and training for soccer will be accommodated at Blackman Park and Burns Bay Reserve.

 

It is not intended to retain the temporary car park in any permanent capacity and the oval would be returned to its full size immediately after the new 200 spaces Little Street Car Park (up from the current 86 spaces) becomes available. The cost of this option has not been costed, but subject to  final requirements, will be less than the $85,000 quoted for the original Option iii.

 

It is pointed out that the intention of providing a temporary car park during the Little Lane development phase is to maintain convenient parking for shoppers, businesses and members of the community visiting the Village as well as the extensive number of users of the Aquatic Centre and gymnasium. As mentioned above, as at 11 November 2013, a petition containing more than 1,100 signatures has been compiled by users of the Aquatic Centre in support of temporary parking options for Pottery Green, with Bluefit confirming approximately 75% of their visitors are Lane Cove residents and 86% travel to the facility by car. Bluefit have also requested that as their swim schools finishes at 6.30pm, it would be preferable for the temporary car park to remain open until 7.00pm. Should the proposal be implemented, this request is supported.

 

In relation to the construction timetable for Blackman Park, tenders have been invited for the project (anticipated to be selected at the December meeting) works on the proposed synthetic playing fields for Blackman Park are expected to be completed by early May 2014. The synthetic playing fields will provide greater capacity for organised sports, particularly during inclement weather which can disrupt the running of competitions.


Legal advice confirms that Council is entitled to construct a temporary or permanent single storey car park on a public reserve notwithstanding the zoning and without submitting a development application under the State Environment Planning Policy (Infrastructure) 2007. The situation of having a car park on land zoned Recreation is no different to other Council parks such as Blackman Park, Bob Campbell Oval and Burns Bay Reserve.

 

Conclusion

 

Whilst it is acknowledged that there is significant community concern from residents living near Pottery Green and existing users of the park, the amended option for a smaller 65 space temporary car park as outlined in this report attempts to address most of the concerns raised by the community. Also, the amended option will allow the continuation of all existing passive and fitness uses as well as all school and organised sport users, except cricket. In determining the way forward Council needs to balance these concerns and inconveniences with the needs of visitors to the Aquatic Centre, Village, businesses and other surrounding facilities during the construction period, who require convenient parking options.

 

 

It is therefore recommended that the amended option iii(a) for temporary parking on Pottery Green be implemented together with a 12 space car park available on the acquisition of 69 Longueville Road from the RMS. A total of 77 temporary spaces would be provided for the community to replace 86 spaces temporarily lost during the development of Little Lane car park site.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

1.   Council receive and note the report;

 

2.   The amended option for provision of a temporary 65 space road base car park on part of Pottery Green, as attached as AT-1 be implemented immediately prior to the closure of the Little Lane Car Park to the public whilst the site is being redeveloped. The option including the changes proposed in the report as a result of the community consultation which include fencing, monitoring traffic impacts and proposed car park opening hours, will allow the following:-

 

i.      Most existing uses and users of the oval including school sports, soccer , dog walkers, trainers and passive users continue during the temporary use;

ii.      A reduction of the traffic impacts on the neighbourhood, due to the reduced scale;

iii.     Screening to be provided at the southern end of the car park to reduce headlight glare;

iv.    A 1.8 meter high fence to be erected along the car park length to separate the car park from the playing field to protect park users and in particular children, as well as the installation of gates at both ends of the park for emergency and maintenance  access;

v.     The car park to operate 7am to 7pm, 7 days a week and be time restricted;

vi.    Additional parking on weekends to cover peak usage of the Aquatic Centre;

vii.    Improved separation to the Occasional Child Care centre; and

viii.   Improved two way traffic flow in Phoenix Street by the temporary removal of five spaces on the eastern side of Phoenix Street with traffic impact including speed to be monitored.

 

3.   The temporary car park be removed and Pottery Green be reinstated as soon as practical after the Little Lane Car Park is available for public use;

 

4.   Following the completion of the purchase of 69 Longueville Road from the RMS, the site be temporarily used as a car park; and

 

5.   Key stakeholders as noted in the report and the community be advised of Council’s decision.

 

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Amended Option ii (a) - 65 Space Temporary Car Park

1 Page

 

AT‑2 View

Report to October 2013 Ordinary Meeting Temporary Car Park Options - Lane Cove Village

3 Pages

 

  


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 November 2013

Lane Cove Plaza - Stage 2 Upgrade

 

 

Subject:          Lane Cove Plaza - Stage 2 Upgrade    

Record No:    SU4860 - 58298/13

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Wayne Rylands 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

At the meeting of 16 August 2013, Council resolved:-

 

1. Council adopt the conceptual plans and perspectives for the Lane Cove Plaza – Stage 2 Upgrade, and place on public exhibition in accordance with the community consultation strategy outlined in the report, for a period of 6 weeks subject to an additional perspective of the:-

a) eastern end from the opposite side of Longueville Rd; and

b) western end from outside the post office.

2. Following community consultation, a further report come back to Council on the community’s preferred option for the Lane Cove Plaza - Stage 2 Upgrade.

3. In conjunction with the opening of the Plaza Stage 2 that Council conduct a barista festival.

4. A report come back to Council on the allocation of outdoor seating.

 

The public exhibition finished on Friday, 25 October 2013. The results of the public exhibition are detailed in the Discussion.

 

Based on the community support, it is proposed that Council proceed with the Plaza – Stage 2 Upgrade, as detailed in Plan 713, dated 13 September 2013, and provided as Attachment 1, subject to Council determining whether to remove the London Plane Tree located outside of the TAB (which will result in some redesign of the public seating area).

 

Discussion

 

The public consultation process was extensive. The consultation involved the use of numerous mediums to allow a broad cross-section of the community to participate in the process. The mediums used by Council are listed below:-

 

·    Large perspective displays set up in Plaza at each end from Friday 13 September;

·    Information packages provided in the Civic Centre and Lane Cove/Greenwich Libraries from Friday 13 September;

·    E-newsletter sent out on Friday 13 September;

·    Advertisement in the North Shore Times on Friday 13 September;

·    On line survey from Friday 13 September;

·    Letters hand delivered to shopkeepers and businesses on Monday 16 September;

·    Public Forum in the Cove Room on Wednesday 26 September;

·    Letters posted to property owners on Friday 4 October; and

·    Face to face random survey interviews by Elton Consulting in the Plaza on Friday 11, Saturday 12 and Sunday 13 October.

 

Feedback from the Community Consultation

Council received over 500 responses through the public exhibition process, including:-

·    81 responses from random face to face surveys conducted by Elton Consulting;

·    Approx.190 online survey responses;

·    102 written submissions from individuals;

·    RASAD survey of 22 shopkeepers and a petition consisting of 117 form submissions;

·    7 submissions from community organisations;

·    Lane Cove Access Committee submission, with recommendations;

·    Lane Cove Alive submission, with an alternate layout;

·    3 submissions from Plaza businesses / owners; and

·    Public Forum Minutes.

 

The results of the Elton Consulting survey and the On-line survey are detailed below. All in all, the responses from these two surveys indicate general support for the proposed upgrade. 

 

Elton Consulting - Face to Face Surveys

(1 = very unsatisfied, 5 = very satisfield)

1

2

3

4

5

Response Total

Response Average

balancing the amount of seating provided for public eating and private dining

3.70%

14.80%

11.10%

42.00%

28.40%

81

3.77

incorporating weather-proof shelters to encourage night time & all year round dining

6.20%

4.90%

11.10%

51.90%

25.90%

81

3.87

including serving/ storage/cooking facilities for restaurants/cafes in the private dining areas

9.90%

18.50%

21.00%

38.30%

12.30%

81

3.25

enlarging the deck with more public seating that can be used as a covered viewing platform for performances

0.00%

4.90%

4.90%

58.00%

32.10%

81

4.18

providing more public seating and new paving throughout the Plaza

0.00%

6.00%

7.20%

55.40%

31.30%

83

4.13

incorporating lighting into the structures to help activate the Plaza at night

1.20%

3.70%

6.20%

54.30%

34.60%

81

4.18

providing more opportunities for public art

0.00%

1.20%

14.80%

40.70%

43.20%

81

4.26

removing some of the trees and replanting new trees

13.60%

22.20%

19.80%

28.40%

16.00%

81

3.12

relocating and redesigning the community notice board

0.00%

4.90%

23.50%

55.60%

16.00%

81

3.83

installing a new touch screen information board

6.20%

7.40%

17.30%

42.00%

27.20%

81

3.77

improving sightlines at the Longueville Rd pedestrian crossing

1.20%

2.50%

7.40%

45.70%

43.20%

81

4.28

providing covered walkways through the Plaza at Birdwood Lane and Market Square arcade

1.20%

7.40%

4.90%

46.90%

39.50%

81

4.17

Council On-Line Survey Results

(1 = very unsatisfied, 5 = very satisfield)

1

2

3

4

5

Response Total

Response Average

balancing the amount of seating provided for public eating and private dining

27.60%

18.23%

21.88%

21.35%

10.94%

192

2.7

incorporating weather-proof shelters to encourage night time and all year round dining

30.05%

12.44%

20.73%

19.69%

17.10%

193

2.81

including serving/ storage/cooking facilities for restaurants/cafes in the private dining areas

35.26%

17.37%

24.74%

15.79%

6.84%

190

2.42

enlarging the deck with more public seating that can be used as a covered viewing platform for performances

18.23%

12.50%

22.92%

28.12%

18.23%

192

3.16

providing more public seating and new paving throughout the Plaza

19.47%

17.37%

17.89%

22.63%

22.63%

190

3.12

incorporating lighting into the structures to help activate the Plaza at night

12.77%

11.70%

20.74%

29.26%

25.53%

188

3.43

providing more opportunities for public art

11.83%

14.52%

36.02%

20.43%

17.20%

186

3.17

removing some of the trees and replanting new trees

42.11%

10.53%

21.58%

13.16%

12.63%

190

2.44

relocating and redesigning the community notice board

14.14%

13.09%

36.13%

23.56%

13.09%

191

3.08

installing a new touch screen information board

27.13%

11.70%

31.38%

17.02%

12.77%

188

2.77

improving sightlines at the Longueville Rd pedestrian crossing

16.32%

11.58%

21.58%

26.32%

24.21%

190

3.31

providing covered walkways through the Plaza at Birdwood Lane and Market Square arcade

27.08%

14.58%

22.40%

17.19%

18.75%

192

2.86

 

In addition to the Elton & On-line surveys detailed in the tables above, Council also received 102 written submissions from individuals, seven (7) community organisations, the Lane Cove Access Committee with their own recommendations, Lane Cove Alive with an alternate proposal and three (3) submissions from Plaza businesses/owners.

 

The Lane Cove ALIVE submission includes an alternate concept design that is more modular and consists of a simple awning system, with formal linear lines of seating and commercial space very much in the mould of the previous Spackman Mossop Michaels proposal. This submission is provided as Attachment 2. The Lane Cove ALIVE proposal requires attachment to the awnings or buildings along the Plaza, or an additional row of columns, to provide full support. Council’s proposal is for an independently supported system with a single line of columns. The Lane Cove ALIVE proposal would also require more extensive footing systems. Council’s proposal has tried to minimise footing systems, due to the large number of underground services through the Plaza. Council has previously rejected the Spackman Mossop Michaels proposal.

The Lane Cove Access Committee submission is generally supportive of the proposal. It is provided as Attachment 3.

 

Individual Written Submissions

The main outcomes from these submissions have been summarised below:-

·    75% oppose the removal of the trees, particularly the Plane trees, with 29% only referring to the trees and no other issues;

·    52% oppose or have concerns about the glass structures – cleaning, heat, design;

·    21% oppose or have concerns about obstruction to pedestrian movement and clutter;

·    14% object to or have concerns about privatising the plaza by café owners; and

·    13% have concerns about the materials- pavers, bricks.

 

Organisation & Business Submissions

 

The organisation submissions raised similar concerns to those raised in the individual written submissions. The submissions from the businesses included objections to the deletion or private seating from outside the Chargrill Charlies, not supporting the inclusion of the structures, and calling for an alternate structure and materials, similar to that recently implemented outside Via Napoli in Austin Street.

 

RASAD petition – 117 individual submissions & business survey (no details of which ones)

RASAD conducted their own survey for individuals, which is included as Attachment 4. It’s results are not considered valid as the Yes/No questions contained within were leading and incorrect in their factual content. For example, the first question asked respondents for a Yes/No on whether they “want 3 of the 4 huge old shady ‘Plane’ trees removed from both ends of the Plaza and the 2 Lilly Pilly trees removed? (& replaced with 3 less shady gums)”. It is true that Council has proposed to replace three of the London Plane Trees (planted in 1986) with three ‘Yellow Bloodwood’ trees (used in the Library forecourt on Longueville Rd). However, the plan is still to retain two (not one) London Plane trees at the eastern end of the Plaza and the significant Eucalypt at the western end of the Plaza. Similarly, the final two questions are incorrect about the coverage of the proposed dining structures in the plaza and in implying a reduction of the public area of 33% to accommodate this. Whilst it is true that the dining seating areas will increase in size, the proposed public seating areas will also increase with a larger deck, and more informal seating at both the eastern and western ends of the plaza.

The RASAD survey for businesses was along similar lines as that undertaken by individuals. Twenty two businesses were surveyed. It is not known whether any of the businesses are members of RASAD. The survey and the results are provided as Attachment 5.

Public Forum

The Public Forum was held as a briefing session at which participants were provided the opportunity to raise their issues. The minutes of this forum are provided as Attachment 6. In the main, it has been noted that a large segment of the community that attended this forum provided written submissions during the exhibition period. A number of the attendees asked for a ‘Do Nothing’ option. The general support for a Plaza upgrade received during the consultation process does not support this option. Even a number of submissions that did not support the proposed upgrade agreed that the Plaza required refurbishment.

 

In summary, the main issues raised through the community forum were as follows:-

 

1.         Loss of the trees (mainly the London Plane trees).

2.         Privatising the use of the Plaza by café owners; Plaza becoming more commercial.

3.         Glass structures getting dirty and being difficult to clean; Heat under the glass.

4.         Fixed structures cluttering, blocking or boxing in the space; Structures restricting pedestrian movement through the Plaza.

5.         Disruption to businesses and people during construction.

6.         Materials to be used – glazed bricks, metal balustrades, glass roofs; will change the character of the Plaza.

7.         Costs.

8.         Outdoor cooking facilities.

 

Responses to the issues raised

 

In both the surveys conducted by Council, two issues did not achieve at least an average score of 2.5. The first being the loss of trees, and the second being the inclusion of serving/storage/cooking facilities for restaurants/cafes. All of the other matters achieved at least a score of 2.5. The two issues that scored lowest in Council’s surveys were also scored lowest in the Elton survey. There was close correlation between the matters raised in the submissions and the forum.

 

Tree Removal

 

In relation to the trees, it is important to note that ongoing planning and management of trees is essential. It is an accepted management practice, to have trees of varying ages in a locality to ensure renewal is possible whilst maintaining the canopy. At the western end of the Plaza two London Plane Trees are proposed to be removed. The tree outside the TAB could be retained, but it would then require a redesign of the public seating area, and a likely loss in the number of seats that can be provided in this area. The other London Plane Tree is required to be removed at the western end of the Plaza to allow for the dining structure to be constructed. Both these trees are being replaced with a suitable species, and as shown in the proposal. The removal of these two trees is only anticipated to have a minimal impact on the shade provided by the canopy, given the size of the existing central Eucalypt which dominates at that end of the plaza, and the fact that the proposed “Yellow Bloodwoods” grow quite quickly and will provide additional canopy within 5 years.

 

The London Plane Tree earmarked for removal at the eastern end of the Plaza is within the existing deck and is recommended for removal because the tree has been determined as structurally unsound by Council’s Senior Tree Officer. It is highly likely that this tree would be removed on safety grounds in the near future in any event.

 

The Lilly Pillies are earmarked for removal as they create a safety hazard with their berries that frequently drop and cause a slip hazard. They also affect the view corridor through the Plaza.

 

The hedge in the garden beds nearest the pedestrian crossing in Longueville Road are proposed to be lowered to provide improved sight distance for motorists on their approach to the crossing, of pedestrians as they approach to cross it from the Plaza.

 

Serving/storage/cooking facilities

 

The provision of serving/storage/cooking facilities for restaurants/cafes also received a lower level of acceptance. The concept plan provided for community consultation detailed the inclusion of possible serving/storage areas. Should restaurateurs require outdoor cooking facilities, Council has previously resolved that any such activity would initially only be approved for a 3 month trial and would need to meet the relevant regulatory requirements. All serving/storage/cooking would be subject to Council approval and be at the restaurateurs cost.

 

 

 

 

Balance between commercial and public seating

 

The balance between commercial and public seating has been addressed in the design by increasing both components. Privatised dining area will increase from 265m2 to 345m2 (80m2) while public seating will increase from 82m2 to 117m2 (35m2) on the deck and from 304m2 to 460m2 (156m2) overall. The increase in seating area, both commercial and public, is predominantly at the eastern end, which has been accommodated through rationalisation of the raised garden beds and relocation of the community noticeboard. The increase in the amount of public seating has been achieved predominantly through the enlarged deck and the seat wall adjacent to the garden bed near Longueville Road.The proposed deck includes more than double the bench/table arrangements than the current deck, achieved by removing the London Plane and Lilly Pilly trees that currently dominate this deck. Other public seating includes new informal cube seating in various locations around the Plaza, and more public seating at the western end of the Plaza. This has been accommodated through the rationalization of the garden bed at the Plaza’s western end, and again improved seat walls plus additional cube and bench seats.

 

Glass roof structures

 

The glass roof structures will be maintained with the new pressure cleaning equipment recently purchased by Council, and with the additional staff position created to operate the equipment. If necessary the roofs can be cleaned on a daily basis. Through etching, tinting, glazing and /or blinds if necessary, the desired performance of the glass roof with respect to heat and shade can be achieved during the detailed design phase, whilst capitalizing on the “light weight” look, available from glass. Council has engaged B&N Architects, who designed Lane Cove Market Square and Library Walk, to undertake the detailed design to achieve a consistent standard.

 

Impact of fixed structures

 

The concerns raised about the fixed structures cluttering, blocking or boxing in the space and restricting pedestrian movement through the Plaza are noted. However, the structures are designed to provide viable eating areas that can operate year round and at night to achieve activation of the Plaza. The cantilevered design has minimized the number of poles and allowed the poles to be located in the centre of the structure, rather than on the edges, to minimize the visual impact. Over the years the Plaza has had commercial seating at varying locations, none of which have caused a situation requiring their removal. The balustrade panels will replace the varied existing balustrades that are necessary to separate seated patrons and pedestrians walking past. As has always been the case, unused space under the structures will be available for the public to utilise and move through as the proposed balustrade panels are removable. Only where dining operations are present, will the areas be blocked to public cross-traffic, similar to the existing situation.

 

Business disruption

 

In relation to the potential disruption to businesses and people during construction, Council staff learnt some valuable lessons about staging and work practices from the Stage 1 works. Staff will work with the Architect and Working Group to develop Construction Management Plans, that will be incorporated into the tender documentation, and that will minimise the disruption to businesses and general community during construction of the Stage 2 works. Council will also work closely with the businesses pre-construction to ensure, where possible, work practices are utilised that minimise the impacts on their livelihoods during the construction phase.

 


Cost and materials

 

It should be acknowledged that the Plaza is the centre piece of the Town Centre, and as such should be afforded appropriate funding to maintain it as a “place for people” that can retain the uniqueness that is Lane Cove. Council has been undertaking Neighbourhood Shopping Centre upgrades over the past four years at a total cost of $1,285,000, the most recent being at Greenwich which cost approximately $510,000. The feedback from the community on these designs has been extremely positive. The scope of this project is not considered excessive given the plaza’s role in the community as it serves the whole Local Government Area. The materials and standard of finishes will be reviewed as part of the detailed design process in conjunction with the Lane Cove Town Centre Councilor Working Group to ensure they are appropriate. As part of their review process, the Working Group will also ensure that Council manages the budget for this project so that community expectations can be met such that a high quality cost-effective product is the result.

 

Conclusion

 

The community consultation process has been extensive, and has identified the main issues of concern to the community. It is appropriate for Council to determine whether or not the Plane Tree located outside of the TAB should be removed. The removal of the remaining trees is necessary for the reasons outlined in the report. Further design development will occur prior to tender which will address issues associated with the performance of the structures and roofing, together with material selection and construction planning.

 

As such, it is proposed that the Lane Cove Plaza – Stage 2 Upgrade Plan 713, dated 13 September 2013, be detailed up to provide working drawings and specifications that can be issued for tender purposes, with a view to commencing the plaza Plaza upgrade in late May 2014.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.               Council adopt the proposed Lane Cove Plaza – Stage 2 Upgrade, as detailed in Plan 713, dated 13 September 2013.

 

2.               The detail design phase, including the materials palette for the paving, balustrades, deck, retaining walls and structures, be undertaken by the appointed architect in consultation with the  Councillor Plaza Working Group (consisting of Clrs Brooks-Horn, Cheong, Hutchens and Brent), prior to detailed documentation being prepared for tender purposes.

 

3.               Following the detailed design phase, documentation be prepared to proceed to tender for the Lane Cove Plaza – Stage 2 Upgrade. 

 

4.               Council receive a report back at the tender assessment stage to select a suitably qualified contractor to undertake the works. 

 

 

 

 

 

Wayne Rylands

Executive Manager

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Lane Cove Plaza Stage 2 Landscape Concept DWG No 713 Date 130913

1 Page

 

AT‑2 View

Jon Johannsen Lane Cove Alive - Submission - Lane Cove Plaza Upgrade Stage 2

10 Pages

 

AT‑3 View

Lane Cove Council Access Advisory Committee - Submission - Lane Cove Plaza Upgrade

2 Pages

 

AT‑4 View

RASAD SURVEY original

1 Page

 

AT‑5 View

Submission on the Lane Cove Plaza Upgrade Stage 2

3 Pages

 

AT‑6 View

Minutes - Lane Cove Plaza Stage 2 Upgrade Public Forum - 26 September 2013

2 Pages

 

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 November 2013

Longueville Road Intersection Improvement Scheme - Results of Community Consultation

 

 

Subject:          Longueville Road Intersection Improvement Scheme - Results of Community Consultation    

Record No:    SU5228 - 56996/13

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Tim Sullivan

 

Items:

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council resolved at its meeting on 19 August 2013 that the Longueville Road Intersection Improvement Scheme be placed on exhibition for 6 weeks and that a further report be prepared for Council summarising the results of the community consultation.

 

The public exhibition period commenced on Friday 20 September 2013 and closed on Friday 1 November 2013. The submissions received during the public exhibition show strong support for the proposed scheme. The vast majority of respondents believe the scheme will improve road safety and pedestrian amenity at the Birdwood Avenue and Little Street intersections.

 

Background

 

The following scheme was placed on public exhibition for 6 weeks:-

 

·    Installation of traffic lights at the Birdwood Avenue intersection (allowing all traffic movements); and

·    Implementation of a left-in, left-out arrangement at the Little Street intersection.


The RMS did not support any alternative to the left in, left out arranged for Little Street. Council staff prepared the following consultation material in accordance with the Consultation Plan proposed in the report to Council for the August 2013 Ordinary Council Meeting:-

 

·    North Shore Times advertisement;

·    eNewsletter;

·    Public exhibition material for the Civic Centre, Lane Cove Library and Council’s Public Website;

·    Online survey; and

·    Notification letters.


Discussion

 

357 responses were received for the online survey results with the results as follows:-

 

·    84% of respondents believe that they would feel safer using the two intersections if the proposed scheme was implemented;

·    80% of respondents believe that the proposed scheme would make the intersections safer and less confusing in terms of pedestrian-vehicle interaction;

·    70% of respondents believe that the scheme would serve as an appropriate gateway to Lane Cove Village.

 


45 written submissions were received with the results as follows:-

 

·    17 of the written submissions expressed support for the proposed scheme; and

·    14 of the written submissions were concerned with the impact of the proposed Birdwood Avenue traffic lights on congestion.

 

Comment

The Birdwood Avenue intersection currently operates as a priority-controlled intersection. Under these conditions Birdwood Avenue operates as the minor arm that gives way to traffic movements on Longueville Road. This is not the most suitable arrangement given that Birdwood Avenue carries at least as much traffic as the northbound and southbound movements on Longueville Road throughout the day. The give-way control therefore results in significant queues on Birdwood Avenue and causes unpredictability in delays at the intersection.

 

The proposed installation of traffic lights at the intersection provides the possibility to allocate green time proportional to the amount of traffic undertaking each movement at the intersection. This could reduce queues on Birdwood Avenue and may result in slightly increased queue lengths on Longueville Road. The proposed traffic lights would also make delays at the intersection more predictable, helping users better predict their journey times.

 

Slightly longer but more predictable queues are considered an acceptable price to pay for the wider road safety and pedestrian benefits as a result of the installation of traffic lights.

 

The precise traffic signal phasing at the intersection would be assessed at the detailed design stage and agreed with RMS.

·    14 of the written submissions suggested that the approach lane configuration at the Epping Road intersection is revised;

 

Comment

 

The coordination of traffic movements from Birdwood Avenue into the appropriate approach lanes at the Epping Road / Longueville Road intersection will be considered at the detailed design stage. Options such as the reallocation of turning lanes at the approaches to the Birdwood Avenue and Epping Road intersections will be assessed in terms of road safety and impact on queue lengths and traffic delays.

 

·    11 of the written submissions were concerned with the impact of the proposed left-in, left-out arrangement on Little Street.

 

Comment

 

The proposed scheme proposes to ban the right-turn into Little Street as part of the left-in, left-out arrangement. This left-in, left-out arrangement is a requirement of RMS and a necessary condition of approval for the traffic lights at Birdwood Avenue. 

 

Council is currently negotiating with State Transit Authority to see if existing bus right-turn movements in to Little Street can be avoided to simplify movements at this intersection even further.

 

A detailed report of the consultation responses is shown attached as AT-1.

 

The proposed Birdwood Avenue / Longueville Road intersection concept layout is shown attached AT-2 (design subject to RMS concurrence).

 

Conclusion

 

Over 400 people took part in the public consultation, which reflects the strong community interest in the proposed scheme. The key results are as follows:-

 

·    84% of online respondents believe that they would feel safer as a pedestrian using the two intersections if the proposed scheme was implemented;

·    80% of online respondents believe that the proposed scheme would make the intersections safer and less confusing for drivers in terms of pedestrian interaction and vehicle priority; and

·    70% of online respondents believe that the scheme would serve as an appropriate gateway to Lane Cove Village.

 

The consultation feedback is positive and unambiguous regarding improvements to road safety and pedestrian amenity arising from the proposed scheme. Council can confidently progress to detailed design stage in the knowledge that community support for the scheme is strong.

 

It is therefore recommended that Council proceed with detailed design of:-

 

·    Traffic lights at the Birdwood Avenue intersection (allowing all movements); and

·    Left-in, left-out arrangement at the Little Street intersection.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

 

1.   Receive and note the Longueville Road Intersection Improvement Scheme Consultation Report;

 

2.   Endorse the proposed Longueville Road Intersection Improvement Scheme and commencement of detailed design work; and

 

3.   Receive a further report following approval of the detailed design by RMS and prior to the tender for construction of the traffic signals and associated works being awarded.

 

 

 

Wayne Rylands

Executive Manager

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Consultation Report_v2

22 Pages

AT‑2 View

Recommended Phasing and Intersection Concept Layout

1 Page

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 November 2013

Little Lane Carpark Redevelopment  - Tender Assessment

 

 

Subject:          Little Lane Carpark Redevelopment  - Tender Assessment   

Record No:    SU5218 - 58322/13

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):      John  Lee 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report sets out the results of the Tender process for the redevelopment of the Little Lane Car Park, 1-5 Little Street, Lane Cove, commencing with a publicly advertised expression of interest from which 4 of 6 selected firms submitted a conforming Tender.

 

Section 55 of the Local Government Act and Part 7 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 provide the legislative framework for the selective tender process.  In this regard the Division of Local Government has confirmed that the project is not categorised as one meeting the Public Private Partnership requirements of the Act.

 

After a detailed assessment of the Tenders received, the reasons for recommending that Council not accept any tender are set out in the report.  The reasons for recommending post tender negotiations are also set out in the report.

 

Background

 

Council at its meeting of 19 August 2013 considered a report in relation to the results of the Expression of Interests called for the redevelopment of the Little Lane Car Park and resolved that:-

 

“1.  Approve a Project Delivery Agreement structure model set out in the report for the purpose of tender documentation for the redevelopment of the Little Lane Car Park 1-5 Little Street, Lane Cove;

2.   Endorse the Capital Expenditure Review and approve, in principle, the financing of the Council’s public infrastructure assets and facilities to be incorporated into the redevelopment of the Little Lane Car Park;

3.   Endorse in principle the inclusion in the tender documentation of a pedestrian footbridge over Little Street;

4.   Request the General Manager to notify the Division of Local Government Department of Premier and Cabinet of the redevelopment of the Little Lane Car Park project;

5.   Approve the General Manager issuing an invitation to tender to the 6 respondents to the EOI as set out in the confidential memorandum to Councillors dated 12 August 2013;

6.   Notify unsuccessful respondents to the EOI of Council’s decision; and

7.   Request the General Manager to investigate and report on alternate car parking arrangements whilst the Little Lane Car park is unavailable for use.”

 

Discussion

 

Tenders were subsequently issued on 16 September 2013 to the six selected respondents. The Tender document was prepared in conjunction with in consultation with King & Wood Mallesons solicitors. The Tender is based on a Project Delivery Agreement (PDA) rather than a traditional design and construct contract with general conditions.  This structure has been accepted by the Division of Local Government as complying with the tendering provisions in Section 55 of the Local Government Act and that the project is not a public private partnership for the delivery of public infrastructure.

The Division of Local Government also confirmed its acceptance of Council’s Capital Expenditure Review for the Project including the manner in which project risks have been considered in the PDA.  Ongoing risk management is an essential part of managing Council’s interest in the project.

 

The Tender is somewhat complex in arrangement.  Councils are not entitled to mortgage property, which is generally considered necessary by a developer to raise capital for a project. To minimize risk, maintain control and minimize costs the PDA structure proposes to retain Council ownership during the project construction. This structure also potentially provides savings to the Developer to be considered as direct benefits to Council.  These savings include significant holding costs, dutiable transactions, land tax, rates and GST margin scheme. 

 

Council’s equity in the project includes the land value and the cost to provide the public infrastructure including the 200 public car parking spaces and the community and retail spaces and the ground level internal lobbies and external podium.  These are referred to as Retained Lot Works.  The Retained Lots will comprise 5 out of 6 stratum lots to be created.  The other stratum lot will be a residential stratum lot comprising the residential car park, residential lobby on the ground floor, fire egress for residential and the residential airspace above the ground floor.  This is referred to as the Residential Lot.

 

In summary, the PDA arrangement provides the Developer with rights to develop the Residential Lot in return for undertaking the Retained Lot works, with a further monetary adjustment as required.

 

To assist the Developer in obtaining in project finance, a Financiers Side Agreement forms part of the Project Delivery Agreement, in lieu of a mortgage. This is effectively a right for the financier to complete the project should the developer default. It does not confer a right to sell the whole property as would normally be the case for a mortgage.

 

Tenders Received

 

Four (4) Tenders were received by the closing date of 4 pm 25 October 2013 from:-

 

·    WN Developments P/L c/- EDG Capital (EDG)  WN Developments P/L controls a SPV for EDG Capital Limited;

·    Taylor Construction Group P/L (Taylor);

·    Hindmarsh Development Australia P/L (Hindmarsh); and

·    Symonds Street Properties P/L (Ecove)– A Subsidiary of Ecove Group P/L.

 

Winten Property Group P/L and Brookfield Residential Properties formally withdrew during the tender period.

 

Tender Evaluation

 

In conjunction with Mr Bill Rock, a consultant probity Advisor engaged through IAB Services, a tender evaluation methodology was adopted.

 

A Tender Assessment Committee comprising the General Manager, Director Major Projects and the recently appointed Director Special Projects has undertaken the tender assessment.  Flowing from the Expression of Interest phase, each of the firms selected were considered to have the capability and financial strength to undertake the project.

 

The Tender included the following evaluation criteria.  The Probity Plan and the tender evaluation methodology further expanded the detail for each of the criteria.

 

 

 

Criteria

Weighting

(i)

Experience, Capability and Financial Strength and the quality of security provided on Council’s equity

10%

(ii)

Premium. This is the net return to Council excluding interest payable on retained equity or sales uplift.

20%

(iii)

Additional Project Return offered for uplift from additional units or net revenue

25%

(iv)

Methodology proposed for the project including tailoring the sequence of activities to ensure desired project outcomes

20%

(v)

Type / scale of S96 modifications being proposed. The level of modifications proposed by the Tenderers is important as the project is intended to become a boutique development.  The number of additional units within the approved external building configuration is limited by the availability of residential car parking.  

15%

(vi)

Timetable with a commitment to have an interim occupational certificate issued for the Public car park within 12 months of acceptance of Tender 

10%

Total

100%

 

The Tender evaluation methodology was intended to consider the components of each criteria with a score based system and the Tenderer’s score being sum of the achieved score / total score * weighting set out below, generally in line with the pro-forma assessment template included in the adopted Probity Plan.

 

Councillors have been provided separately with a confidential comprehensive tender assessment report. Because the report recommends that no tenders be accepted, and recommends post tender negotiations, this report does not publicise the commercial aspects of each Tenderer’s price structure.

 

A key component of the tender response was a requirement to provide sufficient information to evaluate the reasonable and equitable allocation of the project costs between the Retained Lot Works and the Residential Lot Works.  None of the Tenders adequately responded to this schedule.  Further, clarification from Tenderers did not result in any significant adjustments to the respective costs. Transparency in regard to the benefits identified above from the PDA structure which could result in changes to the tendered price for the Retained Lot Works, Premium and sales uplift can also only be undertaken part of the post tender negotiations.

 

The Committee also noted that some tenders did not appear to have reasonably shared preliminary, design or site costs or make appropriate allowance for visitor parking otherwise required in a residential flat development.  Reasonable adjustments would be requested as part of any post tender negotiations.

 

As there was insufficient information to determine the benefits to Council being included in criteria (ii) and (iii) above, scoring of the tenderers leading to a preferred tenderer could not be completed.

The Tender analysis provided sufficient rigour using information provided to conclude that the PDA realisable benefits have not been fully realised.

 

Three (3) Tenderers also proposed non conforming tender scenarios, with insufficient information to accurately assess the net return to Council.  The ability to consider the detail of non conforming tenders can only be undertaken in post tender negotiations with each of the Tenderers.

 

Development risk under the PDA structure is 100% accepted by the Developer, with limited exceptions.  Notwithstanding this, Council must be satisfied that the Developer, whilst having the capacity and experience to undertake similar sized projects also nominates a builder that Council accepts as fitting an acceptable risk profile in regard to prior experience in similar projects. 

 

The Tender Assessment Committee raised concerns that there was insufficient information provided to establish the capability of one of the builders nominated by a Tenderer. 

 

The Committee noted that the interest on capital provided by the Developer’s financier was extremely high for 2 of the 4 Tenderers with adverse impacts on the Tenderer’s net return to Council.  There would appear scope for post tender negotiations to explore avenues for reducing the financing interest necessary. A different PDA structure may minimise project finance costs and provide an opportunity for Council to have a better share in uplift in sales revenue above current market valuations.

 

Accordingly, the Tender Assessment Committee in proposing its recommendation, had regard to:-

 

·    the Tenders received;

·    the lack of certainty in regard to the realisation of the inherent benefits in the Project Delivery Agreement;

·    a number of tender exclusions;

·    Council’s risk appetite; and

·    the potential for Council to improve the net return from the project based on factors identified in the Tender submissions.

 

Tender Review

 

As per the structure of Council’s Project Plan, a tender review Committee comprising the Mayor, Deputy Mayor, General Manager and Director Major Projects reviewed the tender process and the Tender Assessment Committee’s recommendations were considered at a workshop of Councillors on Tuesday 12 November 2013.

 

Probity

 

The Tender assessment has been carried out in accordance with the Probity Plan adopted by Council and in accordance with the Tender evaluation methodology adopted by the Committee. An independent probity advisor has observed the tender assessment process and attended most meetings.  The probity advisors from IAB also advised Tenderers that they would consider any issue relating to probity raised by a Tenderer.

 

Conclusion

 

A confidential memorandum has been circulated separately to Councillors detailing the Assessment of each Tender submitted and details of the financial reference checks undertaken of the each tenderer.

 

For the reasons set out in this report, the Tender Assessment Committee’s recommendations provide an appropriate way forward in selecting a Developer to deliver the project.

 

A further report will be presented to Council once negotiations have been successfully concluded.


 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.   Council not accept any of the Tenders due to the lack of certainty in regard to the realisation of the inherent benefits on the Project Delivery Agreement, tender exclusions, and the potential to improve the net return from the project based on factors identified in the tender submissions;

2.   Council not call fresh tenders as Council, through the Tender Process, has identified a suitable pool of organisations who can undertake the project;

3.   Council undertake Post tender negotiations will all four tenderers to maintain a competitive environment in which Council can achieve value for money through the selection of a preferred Developer;

4.   The General Manager be authorised to enter into negotiations with each of the Tenderers in relation to the following two scenarios:-

i.    The existing PDA structure with a view to realising all the financial benefits of the structure with appropriate security measures; or

ii.    An alternate PDA Structure which includes Council providing additional equity for the project to maximize the net financial return to Council whilst maintaining appropriate risk levels; and

5.   A further report be provided to Council on the outcome of negotiations.

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 November 2013

Development Control Plan Draft Amendment 6 - Battleaxe Blocks

 

 

Subject:          Development Control Plan Draft Amendment 6 - Battleaxe Blocks    

Record No:    SU4889 - 5521/13

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):      Christopher Pelcz 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report recommends that a new section be added in Part C Residential Development of the existing Lane Cove Development Control Plan 2010. The new section will be referred to as Section 1.12 Battleaxe Allotments. These draft DCP amendments are a result of consideration of relevant issues and the review of DCP controls from other Council areas. The aim is to provide greater certainty to stakeholders in relation to battleaxe allotments. The DCP Draft Amendments now need to be formally placed on exhibition as the next technical step in the process.

 

Background

 

Battleaxe Allotments

 

A battleaxe allotment sometimes referred to as a ‘hatchet-shaped allotment’ is one which has no direct frontage to a public road and which relies on a legally-created right-of-way for access to the nearest public road or, occasionally, a private road. Typically, such lots will be found (or can be created) in residential areas where pockets of land-locked real estate have been identified as having potential for subdivision and subsequent residential development in the form of detached dwelling houses.

 

The creation of battleaxe lots is an efficient way of bringing onto the market sites which would otherwise remain land-locked. However, where they are located in existing built-up areas and adjoin existing housing they demand special skills at the dwelling design stage. Case studies reveal that they will often be contentious. However they are the legitimate development right of owners under the Lane Cove controls, to create lots of 550 m2 minimum.

 

Purpose of this report

 

Council resolved at its meeting of 16 July 2012 that:-

 

“A report come back to Council about the DCP controls that could be used to improve the planning process for battleaxe blocks.”

 

At present the Lane Cove DCP 2010 does not have many provisions relating to battleaxe development. Council does however have a subdivision policy which is re-enforced in its development control plan; however this does not provide any controls or standards for DA assessment.

 

At the State Government level, the NSW State Environmental Planning Policy (Exempt and Complying Development Codes) 2008 also makes broad provisions which sets out a minimum standard for the various codes, mainly relating to setbacks and car parking. While some councils in NSW have more detailed controls for battleaxe development in their development control plans than others, for the most part they appear to be assessed against criteria similar to a normal dwelling house.

 

 

 

 

 

Review of other Council Provisions

 

Current controls applying to battleaxe development in 14 councils (13 metropolitan and 1 regional) were analysed for their possible relevance to Lane Cove. The following LGAs were selected because they generally contain large low density areas with some potential for new subdivision and re-subdivision: Blacktown, Blue Mountains, Camden, Canterbury, Gosford, Liverpool, Manly, Penrith, Randwick, Ryde, Shellharbour City, Sydney, Wollongong and Wyong. The outcomes, however, were expected to be relevant for an inner city suburb such as Lane Cove.

 

The salient findings from this limited survey can be summarised as follows:-

 

·    Only one council (Liverpool) had dedicated a complete section of its DCP to dwelling houses on hatchet shaped lots. Clear, simple drawings and explanatory text were evident. Repetition of detailed provisions relating to other forms of residential development was noted probably necessitated by Liverpool’s large greenfield development areas where battleaxe subdivision will be common;

·    Four metropolitan councils (Canterbury, Penrith, Randwick and Sydney) have prohibited or discouraged the creation of any new battleaxe lots through their Development Control Plan;

·    The majority of other councils covered the issue within DCP sections devoted to residential development generally.  The most useful were those with carefully worded text supported by simple diagrams and well-chosen headings / subheading to facilitate referencing;

·    Coverage varied from one or two paragraphs to several pages. There was no single case which could be seen as a model for Lane Cove;
Several councils included useful checklists of matters to be considered during subdivision design but few if any provided advice on dwelling design for battleaxe lots; and
There was a general preference for numeric standards (eg setbacks, height, etc) and little requirement to undertake merit assessment.

 

From this it is clear that appropriate controls for battleaxe block development are very difficult to apply for each individual area. Differing localities result in different streetscapes, design and layout, making a general set of controls in this instance difficult. Setbacks for battleaxe blocks including those in the foreshore area of Lane Cove in particular will provide additional challenges.

However, through a flexible merit-based approach for front setbacks of a battleaxe allotment a greater degree of certainty between neighbours and developers can be achieved. As such a number of recommended changes to the Lane Cove DCP have been prepared (shown attached as AT-1) to support this position.

 

 

Discussion

 

Recent Battleaxe Development in Lane Cove – Case Studies

 

Since 2005, Council has dealt with at least four complex battleaxe proposals, all of which raised considerable community comment in one or more respects  A file review of these cases was undertaken and the results are presented below in summary form.

 

 

16 Private Road, Northwood

 

In November 2005 an application was lodged for approval to construct a dwelling on a battleaxe lot created by an earlier subdivision amalgamating rear portions of three properties. The site is an unusually complex one, with numerous design constraints. It adjoins 7 other existing residential properties. The scheme went through 3 design revisions, a recommendation for refusal, and a mediation stage which was inconclusive. It was finally approved in December 2007, some 26 months after the original lodgement date. There were 3 notification stages, eliciting 9, 14 and 19 objections respectively. Neighbour concerns related to overshadowing, loss of solar access, loss of privacy, garage impact, overdevelopment, height, view loss, access, drainage and trees. 

 

10 Alpha Road - 9 Gamma Road Lane Cove

 

In October 2005 an application was lodged for approval to consolidate 2 existing lots and re-subdivide into 3 new lots.  Although there was clearly a prospect that a new dwelling would in due course be placed on the new lot, the application was for subdivision only; no dwelling was proposed at that time. The application was notified to neighbours and 8 objections were received. In March 2006, Council requested a 'concept plan' for an 'appropriate building footprint' to indicate the likely scale and bulk of a future dwelling. Neighbours were again notified; 4 submissions were received.  In September 2006 the application was refused under 7 grounds, and an appeal was subsequently lodged with the Land and Environment Court.

 

On 13 September 2007 the Court upheld the appeal, when Commissioner Brown granted conditional consent.  In his judgment the Commissioner noted the concerns of residents as relating to change in character of the area, potential tree loss, and amenity impacts such as loss of privacy, overshadowing and loss of solar access. However, it is significant that the Court decided that:-

 

"resident concerns on amenity issues are best left until a specific development application is lodged for a dwelling house" on the new lot.

 

The Court's view was that:-

 

 "the impacts of any design of a dwelling on (the new) are best left to the time when a development application is lodged …..it would be unreasonable to place limits on any future design at this stage." [ie. the subdivision stage]. 

 

An application for a dwelling on the new lot has been approved by Council’s Independent Hearing and Assessment Panel (IHAP) at its 6 November 2012 meeting.

 

35A Arabella Street Longueville

 

In March 2010 Council notified residents of an application to demolish a dwelling on an existing battleaxe lot and construct a new dwelling on that lot. The adjoining property (lot 35 Arabella Street) is a listed heritage item in the Lane Cove LEP 2009. Following notification, residents made submissions relating to loss of privacy, noise from outdoor living area, building height, and boundary fencing. There were 2 set-back non-compliances (side and rear) which were supported by the assessing officer. An objection in the form of a petition (including 24 signatories) was received from local residents. In response to the petition, design amendments were made. The proposal was approved in June 2010.

 

109A Northwood Road Northwood

 

In April 2003 Council approved a battleaxe subdivision at No 109 Northwood Road.  The new lot can be seen as one of many similar lots in this location on the eastern foreshore of Woodford Bay.  In July 2004 Council approved an application for a dwelling and landscaping on the subject site but the consent was not activated and it lapsed. In October 2009 Council received a further application to construct a new but similar dwelling on the subject battleaxe lot. The application was notable for its comprehensive coverage of all design matters, and included a highly detailed Statement of Environmental Effects, a Tree Report, and an archaeological report.

 

The site is steep, highly constrained and presents numerous design challenges. After notification, six objections were received relating to alleged encroachment into regional open space, privacy loss, view loss, stormwater disposal, sedimentation control, and tree loss. All valid objections were resolved by way of conditions; and Council approval was granted in December 2009.

 

Analysis of Case Studies

 

Perusal of these cases reveals that the following issues will typically be associated with battleaxe projects. Not all these issues will arise in every case. Indeed, every case is unique in one or more respects, and this is a reality requiring consideration in any policy review.  It is also a reality recommended to be recognised by those responsible for development assessment of battleaxe proposals, when a flexible approach based on a thorough understanding of site conditions will be preferable to a rigid regulatory position.

 

Determination of appropriate boundary setbacks, having regard to the likelihood that if applied arbitrarily, existing DCP controls will not necessarily suit the particularities of the site, or the reasonable design hopes of the proponent, or the expectations of neighbours.

 

Assertions of adverse impacts on existing views enjoyed by neighbours. The well-accepted planning concept of view-sharing may need clear explanation and justification to neighbours.

 

Adverse impacts on local amenity arising from parking and access arrangement (design and configuration of the access handle,  provisions for visitor parking);  loss of trees and other vegetation; headlight glare; noise, and other amenity elements.

 

Compatibility of architectural treatment of the new dwelling in relation to the existing architectural and landscape context. It is noteworthy that in two of the cases cited above it was claimed by objectors that the subject proposal was an example of 'overdevelopment', yet the proposals were in neighbourhoods which were themselves dominated by large houses.

  

Assertions of privacy loss by existing neighbours. As with views, this is a highly subjective issue and is difficult to quantify. However, the record show that the imposition of conditions requiring privacy screens, minor changes to window locations, obscure glazing and the like will usually suffice to overcome most reasonable objections.

 

From these 4 case studies the main issues surrounding Battleaxe development relate to:-

 

·    appropriation and apportioning front and side setbacks;

·    impacts on existing views;

·    impacts on local amenity;

·    architectural treatment of a new dwelling; and

·    potential loss of privacy.

 

Analysis of these case studies also point to the need for pre-design consultation between proponents and neighbours in order to establish a level of mutual understanding and agreement on contentious matters before design is finalised.

 

Site Analysis

 

Logic suggests that if dwelling design is a sensitive response to a careful and thorough site analysis it should be possible to minimise or even remove the risk of adverse impacts on neighbours. Lane Cove DCP 2010 already contains provisions relating to site analysis. However, given the unusual nature of most proposals for dwellings on battleaxe lots, the DCP should make it mandatory for a detailed site analysis to be undertaken prior to dwelling design, and for that analysis to be submitted as part of the DA documentation.

 

 

 

 

Urban Design Analysis

 

It will be most unusual for a dwelling on a battleaxe lot to become a streetscape element. Hence it would be unreasonable to attempt to apply streetscape design standards to such proposals. 

 

An analysis of common battleaxe subdivision formats has been undertaken.  The most common case is when a single new lot is created at the rear of a large existing lot. The following considerations are relevant:-

 

·    The number of immediate neighbours will vary, depending on the existing subdivision pattern;

·    In an ideal case, any new battleaxe lot should be of such a size and shape as to enable the new dwelling to enjoy adequate solar access to habitable rooms and to private open space, consistent with DCP requirements;

·    Site conditions will be different in every case, suggesting that assessment of dwelling proposals should be on a merit basis.  Council should be able to waive or amend numeric standards (eg boundary set-backs) where site conditions so demand;

·    The height of dwellings on battleaxe lots should be subject to the same controls as apply across the R2 Zone; and

·    As noted above (in the case of dwellings on 'rear' lots with no direct frontage to a street), streetscape design standards will not be relevant.

 

Proposed DCP Changes

 

As mentioned earlier in the Background section of this report, it is considered that if the proposed changes had been in place when the four development applications referred to above were assessed, the assessment process would have brought the following benefits for both Council and the stakeholders:-

·    Neighbours would have been informed at the inception of the design rather than at the time of DA lodgement;

·    Neighbours would have had an opportunity to contribute constructively to the dwelling design process at an early stage to protect their amenity;

·    Expensive and time -consuming litigation might have been minimised;

·    The legitimate development rights of property owners would have been recognised throughout the process; and

·    Final dwelling and landscape design quality would be maximised.

 

Therefore it is recommended that new controls in Part C Residential Development Section 1.12 Battleaxe Allotments be inserted to the Lane Cove Development Control Plan 2010 shown as AT-1 attached to the report.

 

Comments

 

Currently Council does not have a dedicated set of development controls for battleaxe subdivision and development. The research undertaken for this report provides evidence to support the proposition that Council should move to the adoption of dedicated guidelines on battleaxe development in the Lane Cove Development Control Plan (DCP). Such guidelines could include matters to be taken into account at the design stage and the subsequent DA determination stage when merit-based assessments should ideally be the norm. They could also include (for example) requirements for early consultation between neighbours and developers.

 

Due to the varying configurations of dwellings on battleaxe blocks across the Lane Cove area, achieving one standardised numerical minimum setback is considered impractical and unnecessarily restrictive. For example, in the case of 16 Private Road Northwood being an irregular shaped battleaxe allotment, if a minimum numerical front setback control of say 18 metres (measured at the end of the access handle) was adopted by Council it is unlikely this site would comply with it due to its configuration. This site would then go un-utilised and severely impact upon the development potential of the land.

 

Considering front setbacks for battleaxe blocks on case-by-case merits based assessment during the pre-DA stage seems a much more appropriate response than imposing rigid unrealistic guidelines. Hence the proposed amendment does not adopt a numerical control for front setbacks of battleaxe blocks either existing or new created as it would unnecessarily restrain development and potential redevelopment of these sites.

 

The other issue relating to battleaxe blocks is access; these controls aim to comply with the relevant standards and best practice guidelines. The other major issues relate to stormwater management, dwelling orientation and site planning.

 

Community Consultation

 

Statement of Intent

 

The consultation is designed to inform the public regarding the detailed controls for battleaxe development.  Any comments received will be reviewed and evaluated to determine whether or not to proceed with the proposed Battleaxe Development Controls.

 

Method

 

Level of Participation

Inform

Inform

Consult

Form of Participation

Open

Targeted

Open

Target Audience

Lane Cove Community and community groups

Community Associations

Lane Cove Community

Proposed Medium

Advertisement and eNewsletter

Notification Letters

Public Exhibition, Website Exhibition and Survey

Indicative Timing

January - February

January - February

January - February

 

Conclusion

 

Appropriate controls relating to battleaxe developments are difficult to modify. Character in each Council is unique to its own locale and therefore difficult to maintain. Many councils in the Sydney Metropolitan Area do not have appropriate controls relating to the treatment of battleaxe blocks.  

 

Lane Cove LGA includes numerous areas with battleaxe blocks, due to the irregular topography and historical settlement patterns, in which battleaxe blocks serve a useful role to provide housing. In Lane Cove achieving single numerical controls, for example, front setbacks of battleaxe blocks, will unnecessarily restrict development potential of these blocks as many of them would find it difficult to comply. Discussing what is considered reasonable from the applicant, neighbours, and Council’s point of view at the pre-DA stage seems an appropriate treatment for this type of development without a number of restrictions. Each case should be considered on its own merits which is what this proposed amendment aims to achieve.

 

It is recommended that Council endorse the proposed amendment for the purposes of public exhibition.

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

1.   Adopt for purposes of public exhibition DCP Draft Amendment 6: Battleaxe Blocks, as shown attached at AT-1.

2.   Undertake consultation in accordance with the Consultation Strategy outlined in this report.

3.   Receive a further report on the results of consultation.

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Draft DCP Amendment No 6: Part C - Residential Development

42 Pages

 

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 November 2013

Review of Rating Structure

 

 

Subject:          Review of Rating Structure    

Record No:    SU772 - 46390/13

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Craig Dalli 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

At present approximately 46% of residential rate payers in the Lane Cove Local Government Area (LGA) are paying the minimum Residential Rate of $538 for 2013/14. This group whilst comprising of 46% of ratepayers, only pays 21% of the total Rates, whilst having access to the same services and facilities as all other ratepayers. Currently all residential units, regardless of size and value, pay the minimum Residential Rate.

 

To ensure equity in sharing the rating burden, it is proposed that Council review its existing Rating Structure with a view to making Special Variation applications to the Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal (IPART) for increases in minimum Residential Rates for Lane Cove. Specifically, the report will consider and recommend that Council undertake consultation on two (2) options for increases i.e. a three year and a five year option. Neither option will result in additional revenue to Council, but will make the rate burden more equitable.

 

Background

 

The Lane Cove LGA is currently experiencing significant growth with a requirement to provide 3,900 new dwellings by 2031, equating to a population increase of approximately 30%. With the growth it is expected that there will be increased demand for the provision by Council of a wide range of services and facilities.

 

The majority of new dwellings will be home units in areas up zoned with the adoption of Lane Cove LEP 2009. Therefore, under the current rating structure the number of ratepayers on the minimum Rate will increase disproportionately to the number of residential ratepayers generally in houses. In terms of equity, a smaller proportion of residential ratepayers will effectively carry a greater percentage of the rating burden despite all ratepayers having the same access to services and facilities provided by Council.

 

Residential Rates are calculated as follows:-

 

·    Valuer General determines the Unimproved Capital Value (UCV) i.e. land value of all properties.

 

·    The UCV or land value multiplied by the ad valorem tax (i.e. rate in the dollar) is used to calculate Rates paid. E.g. a property with an UCV of $400,000 and an ad valorem tax rate in the dollar of $0.184056 will pay $736.22 in Rates.

 

·    However, under rate pegging, the total income received from Rates is capped. Therefore, if property values increase by 10% over 4 years, and the statutory Rate cap is 3%, the income derived from UCV Residential Rates cannot exceed the cap of 3%. To achieve this the ad valorem tax rate in the dollar is reduced to compensate for the increase in value.

 

It is noted that the adopted rating structure for 2013/14 is as follows:-

 

·    For Residential Rates, a minimum Rate of $538 is payable for land up to a value of $292,302 with an ad valorem tax rate i.e. rate in the dollar of 0.184056, applied to all land values in excess of $292,302 (the break even value); and

·    For Business Rates, a minimum rate of $800 applies to land values up to $99,263 and an ad valorem rate of 0.805940 applies to all land values in excess of $99,263 (the break even value). It is not proposed to modify the current Business Rating Structure.

 

The number of residential ratepayers on minimum and ad valorem rates in 2013/2014 is as follows:-

 

 

Residential

On Minimum Rate

5,966

46.43%

On Ad Valorem Rate

6,884

53.57%

 

12,850

100%

 

Section 548 of the Local Government Act 1993 (the Act) allows a council to specify a minimum amount of a rate to be levied on each parcel of land. If a council makes an ordinary rate for different categories or sub-categories of land, it may specify a different minimum amount for each category or sub-category. As noted above, Council has adopted for 2013-14 a minimum Rate of $538 for Residential Rates.

 

If Council resolves to adopt a minimum amount of a Rate, the size of any minimum amount must not exceed the relevant permissible limits provided for in section 548 (3) of the Act and clause 126 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005, unless Ministerial approval for a higher amount has been granted. For 2013/14, the permissible limit was 3.4%. If Council is seeking to introduce a new minimum Rate above the statutory maximum increase, an application will need to be submitted to IPART for approval. This is despite Council’s overall revenue from Rates staying within the cap, due to the corresponding reduction for the ad valorem ratepayers.

 

While it is a matter for councils to determine their Rating Structure, including the level of any minimum Rates, councils are generally encouraged to ensure that no more than 50% of ratepayers within each respective category or sub-category would pay the minimum rate. As noted in the table above, at present 46.43% of residential ratepayers are levied the minimum rate. However, with the ongoing significant growth in the number of approvals for unit dwellings since the adoption of Lane Cove LEP 2009, it is expected that the number of residential ratepayers on the minimum rate i.e. unit owners will exceed 50% in the near future. The current Rating System does not provide a method to reduce the % on the minimum, which was identified by the Independent Local Government Review Panel. Their final report is expected by the end of the year. The proposed measures will at least address the financial burden issue.

 

The Rationale

 

The rationale for increasing the minimum rate is based on the following equity principles:-

 

1.   For the most part, ratepayers receive the same benefits from Council and have access to the same range of facilities, regardless of the amount of rates paid.

 

Services include; parks and recreation facilities, road construction and maintenance, footpaths, street lighting, street cleansing, Fire Brigade levy, dog and pest control, library services, community services, sporting and health facilities, building control & town planning, environmental planning, sustainability and conservation, bushfire control and more;

 

2.   Ratepayers in units, some with similar number of occupants to an average house pay considerably less rates for the same amount of services. ABS Census data from 2011 identified that 10,471 Lane Cove residents lived in units, with the average occupancy rate per unit being 1.90 persons and 18,352 residents live in dwelling houses, with the average occupancy rate being 3.03 persons.

3.   The 5,966 or 46.43% of residential properties subject to the minimum rate, contribute only approximately 21% to the overall residential rate income.

 

4.   Over a period of time rate pegging has increased the gap between minimum rates and those above the minimum.

 

Over a period of time rate pegging has increased the gap between minimum rates and those above the minimum. For example in 2002/2003 the gap between the minimum residential rate ($330) and the average ad valorem rate ($1,056) was $726 per annum. In 2012/2013 the gap between the then minimum residential rate ($520) and the average ad valorem rate ($1,674) was $1,154 per annum. This means the gap between minimum and ad valorem residential rates increased by $428 per annum over ten (10) years.

 

Rates paid for home units are based on the strata title unit entitlements, i.e. the size of each unit compared to other units. As the land value component of each unit is so low, all units pay the same minimum rate, currently $538, regardless of size and location. For example in Duntroon Avenue, a ground floor 90sqm unit has an entitlement value of $67,648, while a top floor 167sqm has a value of $105,096. Despite the difference they both pay the same in rates because the entitlement has no effect until the value reaches the break even amount of $292,302.

 

The inequity issue extends beyond units, as houses have higher land values and therefore pay considerably more in rates. For example a house in Burns Bay Road sold for $875,000 in January  2012 pays rates of $1,235, while the larger Duntroon unit bought for $825,000 in June 2011, pays rates of $538. Other examples include another house in Burns Bay Road bought for $1,150,000 in February 2012 pays rates of $1,646, while a unit in Burns Bay Road sold for $1,410,000 in February 2013 is levied the minimum rate of $538.

 

Proposed Action

 

To address the inequity in the rating structure is it proposed to undertake a review of the current structure for residential rates. This involves increasing the value of the minimum rates, while reducing the ad valorem rate. This will not result in additional income to Council, but will achieve a shift in the rates burden onto units from houses to more equitable levels. The process involves extensive community consultation and making application to IPART for a Special Variation.

 

Options for Increase

 

To minimise the impact of the proposed increase, modelling has been carried out for the following options for increases to minimum rates of 35% over and above the rate cap (assumed at 3% per annum) spread over three (3) and five (5) years respectively.

 

 

Option 1 (i.e. 3 years)

Option 2 (i.e. 5 Years

Year

Proposed Increase

Proposed Minimum Rate

Proposed Increase

Proposed Minimum Rate

2014/15

15% + Rate Cap

$635

7% + Rate Cap

$592

2015/16

10% + Rate Cap

$717.50

7% + Rate Cap

$651

2016/17

10% + Rate Cap

$811.00

7% + Rate Cap

$716

2017/18

Rate Cap

$835.50

7% + Rate Cap

$788

2018/19

Rate Cap

$860.50

7% + Rate Cap

$867

 

Following the three year period for Option 1 and five year period for Option 2, variations will be restricted to the normal rate pegging limit as determined by the State Government, which has been assumed at 3% per annum for the purposes of the modelling.

 

By way of comparison, the 2013/14 minimum Residential Rates and anticipated minimum rates for 2016/17 i.e. after 3 years and 2018/19 i.e. after 5 years (based on 3% per annum statutory increases) for the councils in the Sydney North Group are as follows:-

 

 

2013/14 Minimum Rate

Anticipated Minimum Rate 2016/17

Anticipated Minimum Rate 2018/19

Ryde

$473.30

$517.00

$549.00

Ku-ring-gai

$474.00

$518.00

$550.00

North Sydney

$474.00

$518.00

$550.00

Hunters Hill

$492.00

$538.00

$571.00

Lane Cove

$538.00

 $716 or $811.00

$860.50 or $867.00

Willoughby

$702.20

$767.00

$814.00

Manly

$751.50

$821.00

$871.00

Warringah

$793.17

$867.00

$918.00

Pittwater

$799.89

$874.00

$927.00

 

If an application based on Option 1 is successful, the increase in year one for ratepayers on the minimum rate would be an increase of $97 or $1.86 per week, with this amount including the rate pegging increase of 3%,,or $16, which would have been applied with or without the application being approved. The remaining residential ratepayers on the ad valorem rate would receive a 2.6% decrease in Rates, instead of a 3% increase from the rate peg increase. In relation to Option 2 for year 1 there would be an increase of $54 or $1.05 per week for ratepayers on the minimum rate, while the remaining ratepayers on the ad valorem rate would receive a decrease of 0.04%.

 

The following table summarises the changes to the Rating Structure for Residential Rates under the proposals:-

 

Option 1
i.e. increases of 15%, 10% and 10% over next three years plus 3% per annum rate cap.

 

Year

Estimated Number of Ratepayers

Total Res

Rate in $

Min Rate

Average
Ad valorem Rates

% Min

Rates income break up

Min Rate

Ad Valorem

% Min

% Ad Val

2013/14

5,966

6,884

12,850

0.184056

$538.00

$1,735.56

21%

79%

2014/15

6,266

6,859

13,125

0.179846

$635.00

$1,705.60

26%

74%

2015/16

6,766

6,840

13,606

0.174463

$717.50

$1,650.45

30%

70%

2016/17

7,266

6,820

14,086

0.166701

$811.00

$1,573.34

36%

64%

2017/18

7,766

6,800

14,566

0.166101

$835.00

$1,554.73

38%

62%

2018/19

8,266

6,780

15,046

0.165217

$860.00

$1,542.73

41%

59%

 

Option 2

i.e. increases of 7% per annum over next five years plus 3% per annum rate cap.

 

Year

Estimated Number of Ratepayers

Total Res

Rate in $

Min Rate

Average
Ad valorem Rates

% Min

Rates income break up

Min Rate

Ad Valorem

% Min

% Ad Val

2013/14

5,966

6,884

12,850

0.184056

$538.00

$1,735.56

21%

79%

2014/15

6,266

6,859

13,125

0.184013

$592.00

$1,734.94

24%

76%

2015/16

6,766

6,840

13,606

0.181458

$651.00

$1,706.58

27%

73%

2016/17

7,266

6,820

14,086

0.177492

$716.00

$1,665.33

31%

69%

2017/18

7,766

6,800

14,566

0.171836

$788.00

$1,608.41

36%

64%

2018/19

8,266

6,780

15,046

0.164304

$867.00

$1,534.20

41%

59%

 

It is pointed out that the above figures including the ad valorem rates are subject to variation depending on the annual determination in the rate cap. Additionally, a revaluation of properties will be undertaken during the period which is expected to result in a variation (reduction) in the ad valorem rate to keep within the prescribed rate cap.

 

In terms of affordability, Rates represent a relatively small component of expenses for strata units when comparing the minimum rate of $538 to strata fees, which range from $500 to $2,000 a quarter i.e. $2,000 to $8,000 per annum.

 

At present there are 398 pensioners out of the 5,966 ratepayers on the minimum rate. Whilst it is anticipated that there would be a low level of hardship as a result of the less than $2 per week increase, Council has an existing safety net for pensioners which allows them to make application for hardship relief.

 

Community Consultation

 

Prior to making application to IPART for a special variation, Council is required to demonstrate that the community has been widely consulted on the proposed variations and potential benefits and implications. It is therefore proposed that the community be consulted in a variety of ways including website, brochures inserted with Rate notices, independent survey, community meeting and newspaper advertisement.

 

The consultation is designed to inform the community of the proposal and to seek feedback. Any comments and survey responses will be reviewed and evaluated to determine if Council should proceed with the changes to the rating structure and if so which structure to adopt.

 

Level of Participation

Inform

Inform

Consult

Consult

Form of Participation

Open

Targeted

Open

Targeted

Target Audience

Lane Cove Community

Community Associations

Lane Cove Community

Ratepayers

Proposed Medium

Advertisement and

eNewsletter.

Briefing Sessions

Website Exhibition, Public Exhibition including staff exhibition over 2 days, Thursday evening and Saturday morning in the Plaza.

Deliberative Poll

 

Indicative Timing

Late Jan – Mar 2014

Late Jan – Mar 2014

Late Jan – Mar 2014

Late Jan – Mar 2014

 

Conclusion

 

As noted, the review of minimum rates has been proposed to ensure that there is a more equitable allocation of responsibility for the payment of Rates, given all ratepayers and residents have access to the same range of facilities and services provided by Council. It is not about increasing the residential rating income. It is recommended that Council undertake consultation in relation to the change to the rating structures and if a change proceed which of the two options, 3 year or 5 year should be the subject of the application to IPART.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

 

1.   Receive and note the report;

 

2.   Proceed with the community consultation as outlined in the report, in relation to making Special Variation applications to IPART for increases in the minimum Residential Rate based on:-

                

                 Option 1 - 15% for 2014/15, 10% for 2015/16 and 10% for 2016/17 over the rate pegging limit for the next three (3) financial years; or

                

                 Option 2 - increases of 7% per annum over the rate pegging limit for the next five years

                       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 November 2013

Draft Street Tree Master Plan

 

 

Subject:          Draft Street Tree Master Plan    

Record No:    SU5032 - 49523/13

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Susan Butler 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council engaged consultants, Arterra Design Pty Ltd to prepare a Draft Street Tree Master Plan to assist Council’s street tree planting program for the next 10 to 15 years. The Street Tree Master Plan identifies plant species on a street by street basis, suitable for use as street trees consistent with the existing landscape character. The draft plan is now ready for public exhibition. Due to the size of the Draft Street Tree Master Plan, it has been attached electronically as AT1 and is available online.

 

Background

 

There are nearly 12,000 street trees in the Lane Cove LGA, with around 200 different species of trees used in the 296 streets. Street trees are important community assets that are valuable to the amenity of the local area. They are an integral part of Council’s infrastructure. They are under increasing pressure from services, development impacts and the changing environment. Council resolved at its meeting of 19 November 2012 that a Street Tree Master Plan be developed.

 

Discussion

 

A short online community survey promoted through Council’s e-newsletter ran from 27 March to 15 April 2013. The purpose of this survey was to provide an opportunity for residents to give Council some preliminary feedback on the current street tree planting in Lane Cove.

 

The following points summarises the feedback from this survey:-

 

•     288 responses to the community survey run in March/April 2013

•     84% of respondents had one or more street trees outside their property;

•     61% of these were positive or neutral about that street tree;

•     85% of respondents supported or were neutral about Council’s long standing policy to use predominantly local native species as street trees.

•     Positive responses given about the street trees included:– trees are a major part of local landscape character, provide shade, provide habitat for birds and other wildlife, provide screening of high rise, provide feelings of well being; respondents are happy with lots of variety of trees, would like to see more trees.

•     Negative responses given about the street trees included:- trees are misshapen due to poor pruning under wires, concerns about leaf and branch drop, concerns about trees blocking footpaths and sightlines, there is inconsistent planting, lack of uniformity of trees, trees need to be trimmed more, high cost of tree maintenance, concerns about continuing loss of trees.

 

The responses provided a snapshot of community perspectives and these were considered by the consultants during the preparation of the Draft Plan.

 

The Draft Street Tree Master Plan has the following information:-

 

·    An overview of the landscape character in each of the neighbourhood in the LGA;

·    A description of the landscape character of each of the main road corridors in the LGA;

·    Street tree planting guidelines for the typical Lane Cove street and verge profiles;

·    A list of proposed tree species for each street in the LGA;

·    A list of streets suitable for aerial bundled conductors (ABC) to reduce the impact of pruning under the overhead wires; and

·    Street tree data sheets with photos and detailed information for each recommended tree species.

 

The Draft Street Tree Master Plan is now ready for public exhibition. It will be placed on exhibition for a period of 9 weeks starting in December 2013 (to take into account the Christmas Holiday period). Members of the public are invited to comment on the draft plan by providing submissions in writing that are as detailed and specific as possible.

 

Community Consultation

 

Statement of Intent

 

The consultation is designed to determine if there are any necessary modifications to be made to the Draft STMP. Any comments received will be reviewed and evaluated by relevant staff and the consultants to determine if there are any changes to be made to the Plan prior to its adoption.

 

Method

 

Level of Participation

Inform

Inform

Involve

Consult

Form of Participation

Open

Targeted

Targeted

Open

Target Audience

Lane Cove Community

Key Message givers eg. Residents Associations

Sustainability and Bushland Management Advisory Committee

Lane Cove Community

Proposed Medium

Advertisement in the North Shore Times, Public exhibition, community newsletters and eNewsletter

 

Notification Letters

Table draft STMP at committee meetings

Public Exhibition,

Website Exhibition and Survey

 

Indicative Timing

December -  February 2014

December -  February 2014

December -  February 2014

December -  February 2014

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

1.   Adopt the Draft Street Tree Master Plan dated November 2013 for the purpose of public exhibition.

 

2.   Place the Draft Street Tree Master Plan on public exhibition for 9 weeks in accordance with the consultation strategy outlined in the report.

 

3.   Receive a further report following the public exhibition period to consider the results of the community consultation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wayne Rylands

Executive Manager

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Draft Lane Cove Street Tree Master Plan November 2013

182 Pages

Circulated Separately

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 November 2013

Green Roofs Research Project

 

 

Subject:          Green Roofs Research Project    

Record No:    SU4158 - 49800/13

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):      Vivienne Albin 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Under Council’s Sustainability Levy the Strategic Planning Section received a grant to engage a Consultant to research green roofs/walls to provide policy guidance.

 

Research was undertaken and a report produced that considered the potential for green roofs/walls in four areas of Lane Cove. The report then considered whether green roofs/walls are appropriate and also how they might be encouraged in certain areas.

 

In summary, the research concluded that there may be potential for green roofs/walls for new buildings in the Lane Cove Village and the St Leonards Precinct, in particular, and some private developments elsewhere. The report emphasised the importance of demonstration projects and discussed a bonus system for green roofs. However, the report concluded that more research needed to be undertaken before Council either includes bonus provisions for, or mandates, green roofs/walls in policy documents. It is not proposed to introduce DCP controls at this stage.

 

Outcomes of this project include-:

 

-     Investigation into the feasibility of establishing a green roof demonstration project on a proposed Council building to achieve scientific and educational goals;

-     Review of landscape requirements in Council policy documents to ensure more street trees and trees on private land in the industrial zone, and the protection of existing trees (on public and private land) in residential areas, in conjunction with Council’s other tree planting and preservation policies;

-     Council’s adoption and subsequent promotion on the website of the resource manual, Green Roof and Wall Fact Sheets, as an information document for Council or developers for new residential flat buildings, commercial or industrial buildings.

 

Background

 

Through Council’s Sustainability Levy, support was received for research into the benefits of green roofs/walls. The questions being investigated included what are the benefits of green roofs/walls, where are they possible in Lane Cove and should local policies mandate for them. Literature discusses the benefits of green roofs in helping to manage stormwater runoff and mitigate the urban heat island effect, while reducing energy demands and combating climate change.

 

A consultant (Tone Wheeler of Environa Studios) was engaged to research current best practice regarding green roofs/walls. The study broadly considered the environmental, economic and social benefits of developing green roofs/walls on residential, commercial and industrial buildings in Lane Cove.

 

The outcomes of the study include:-

 

Volume 1

This report (shown attached as AT-1) includes information on the potential for green roofs and walls in Lane Cove, discusses incentives and requirements for the introduction of green roofs and walls in Lane Cove and includes background area calculations.

 

Volume 2 – Resource Manual

This resource manual (shown attached as AT-2) includes detailed technical fact sheets for green roofs and walls.

 

This information is to allow Council to make a decision as to whether green roofs/walls should be addressed in Council policies to increase energy efficiency in the Lane Cove built environment. The Resource Manual also guides Council or developers on how to construct a green roof.

 

Discussion

 

Volume 1 - Potential for green roofs and walls in Lane Cove LGA

 

This part of the report considers the potential for green roofs/walls within four areas of Lane Cove.

 

Zone 1 – Lane Cove Business Park (industrial estate in Lane Cove West)

 

The report concludes that:-

 

A review of surface conditions shows that most of the roofs are made from metal deck and are lightweight in construction and offer no potential for intensive green roofs and little potential for extensive green roofs or walls.

 

However, the gains that would be made from this [green walls and roofs] are what we might call tertiary gains. That is, those to be made after the introduction of a greater number of street trees and secondly trees to private properties in the landscaped areas around the buildings. Given that this is only a tertiary effect it is not considered that any mandatory requirements for green roofs be introduced in the area.

 

Zone 2 – Lane Cove Village

The report considers that existing buildings in the Village generally are not well suited to green walls or roofs as few could carry the weight loads. Furthermore, road and paving in the Village totals approximately 60%. However, unlike the industrial area an increase in street trees or trees in curtilage is not possible (due to the highly urbanised nature of the area) and therefore the introduction of green roofs and walls should be considered in this area through demonstration projects on Council properties or a bonus system (eg, FSR or height) for the provision of a green roofs on new developments.

 

Zone 3 – St Leonards Precinct

This area was considered to be similar to the Village, including a low amount of existing street trees with limited opportunity for further street trees or trees within building curtilage. For this area, the report concludes that:-

 

Given that the area is also undergoing substantial reconfiguration with additional buildings, including additional residential buildings set back 1-2 blocks from the Pacific Highway it is considered that this is an area that could be considered for both demonstration projects on the new residential projects and the possibility for the consideration of additional bonuses for the introduction of green roofs and walls in the commercial area.

 

Zone 4 – Helen Street Precinct

In this precinct, the cost of replacing existing roofs with structures suitable for green roofs was considered not to be financially feasible. Moreover, this area was found to have a high ratio of landscape green space (more than 55%). The consultant concluded for this area:-

 

Rather than undertaking a green roof or wall project in these areas or indeed the extensive low-rise low-density suburban areas which surround it, it is important to ensure that the existing street trees and rear residential plantings are maintained.

 

Summary

 

The potential for green roofs/walls in the four zones outlined above can be summarised as follows:-

 

·          Lane Cove West industrial area – greater environmental gains would be made through the introduction of more street trees and trees on private land than by green roofs/walls.

 

·          Lane Cove Village – green roofs/walls could be encouraged in new buildings through demonstration projects or bonuses (height or floor space ratio).

 

·          St Leonards - green roofs/walls could be encouraged in new buildings through demonstration projects or bonuses (height or floor space ratio).

 

·          Helen Street Precinct – ensure that existing street planting and rear plantings on private land are maintained.

 

Volume 1 - Report - Incentives and requirements for the introduction of green roofs and walls in Lane Cove

 

The Report states that there are city wide benefits for green roofs (and some green walls):-

 

1.   A reduction in the Urban Heat Island Effect (UHIE);

2.   Reduction in stormwater run-off; and

3.   Potential carbon sinks or offsets.

 

Also, benefits to the owners/occupants may take 3 forms:-

 

1.   Providing open space for the occupants;

2.         Providing green energy for the building through solar or other green technologies; and

3.   Providing potential food production for the owners/occupants.

 

The Report puts forward 3 ways to promote green roofs; demonstration projects, encouragement through the adoption of bonuses within the planning policies and the introduction of requirements for mandating green roofs and walls.

 

Regarding demonstration projects, the report states:-

 

Council may wish to consider the introduction of a demonstration project that would allow for both scientific study and the marketing and demonstration to the public to be obtained from such a roof. In this case it may be possible that the new council buildings in Lane Cove Village adopt either an extensive or intensive green roofs, together with green technologies, to demonstrate those benefits. It is particularly pertinent that the public have access to such a roof in order to understand its benefits, particularly in terms of amenity.

 

Although the report in part canvases as an option the adoption of bonuses for green roofs, it then goes on to state that given the lack of current Australian data on the benefits of green roofs it is not recommended to introduce such bonuses until further study has been undertaken.

 

The report goes on to state that given the lack of numerical data on the benefits of green roofs in the Australian climate and the very small areas that are available for green roofs in Lane Cove, any mandatory requirements for green roofs is not warranted at this stage.

 

Volume 1 - Area Calculations

 

For the four areas of Lane Cove considered by the consultant for green roofs, calculations were undertaken from aerial photographs to estimate area percentages for buildings, road and paving, trees/landscaped green space and possible green roofs. These calculations informed other parts of the report detailed and could be used by Council to assist in other policy areas such as landscaped open space provisions. For example, landscape policies could be reviewed to require the provision of more trees on public and private land in the Lane Cove industrial area.

 

Volume 2 – Resource Manual

 

This Resource Manual includes descriptive and detailed technical information. The Manual sets out the different types of green roofs, such as extensive and intensive, the advantages of green roofs for the community and for owners, outlines green roof technologies and details maintenance.

 

The Manual also includes various photographs of operational green roofs/walls currently found in Sydney.

 

The Manual could be used in the design of any demonstration green roofs on new Council developments, or by private applicants on new residential flat building, commercial or industrial buildings.

 

Conclusion

 

A grant obtained under Council’s Sustainability Levy allowed the engagement of a consultant to research green roofs/walls and their application in four areas of Lane Cove. The consultant also produced a general resource manual providing guidance in planning, constructing and maintaining green roofs/walls.

 

Research was undertaken and a report produced that considered the potential for green roofs/walls in four areas of Lane Cove. The report then considered whether green roofs/walls are appropriate and also how they might be encouraged in certain areas.

 

In summary, the research concluded that there may be potential for green roofs/walls for new buildings in the Lane Cove Village and the St Leonards Precinct. The report emphasised the importance of demonstration projects and discussed a bonus system for green roofs. However, the report concluded that more Australian research needed to be undertaken before Council either includes bonus provisions for, or mandates, green roofs/walls in policy documents. At this point in time, a demonstration project is considered to be the most beneficial course of action.

 

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

 

1.   Investigate the feasibility of establishing a green roof demonstration project on a proposed Council building to achieve scientific and educational goals.

 

2.   Review landscape requirements in Council policy documents to ensure more street trees and trees on private land in the industrial zone, and the protection of existing trees (on public and private land) in residential areas.

 

3.   Place the resource manual, Green Roof and Wall Fact Sheets, on Council’s website as an information document for the community and developers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Volume 1 - Green Roofs and Walls Report - Environa Studios

19 Pages

AT‑2 View

Volume 2 - Lane Cove Council - Green Roof and Wall Fact Sheets (Resource Manual) Environa Studios

18 Pages

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 November 2013

Lane Cove Traffic Committee Meeting held on Tuesday 15 October 2013

 

 

Subject:          Lane Cove Traffic Committee Meeting held on Tuesday 15 October 2013    

Record No:    SU1326 - 55933/13

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Tim Sullivan 

 

 

 Executive Summary

 

The Lane Cove Traffic Committee Meeting was held on Tuesday, 15 October 2013.  The Agenda is included as AT-1.  The Traffic Committee recommendations are shown in the Minutes of the Meeting, included as AT-2.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council adopt the recommendations of the Lane Cove Traffic Committee Meeting held on Tuesday, 15 October 2013.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wayne Rylands

Executive Manager

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Agenda - Lane Cove Traffic Committee 15 October 2013

13 Pages

 

AT‑2 View

Minutes - Lane Cove Traffic Committee 15 October 2013

5 Pages

 

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 November 2013

1st Quarter Review of the 2013-2014 Budget

 

 

Subject:          1st Quarter Review of the 2013-2014 Budget    

Record No:    SU757 - 54346/13

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Craig Dalli 

 

 

Executive Summary

The First Quarter 2013 - 2014 Budget Review involves a variety of variations in both income and expenditure. It is recommended that the Budget be varied in terms of the report.

 

Background

 

Council is required to prepare a Budget Review Statement each quarter, in accordance with Clause 203 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005. This report is prepared in accordance with the clause for the period ending 30 September 2013. The Division of Local Government has issued a prescribed format for reviews which is included as an attachment to this report. The purpose of these reviews is to ensure that the impact of financial variations are reflected in the forecast of Council’s global budgetary position to 30 June 2014, and the adopted Budget adjusted accordingly.

 

Discussion

The following is a summary of Council’s adopted Budget for 2013 - 2014 and the revised Budget following the adjustments included in this report:-

 

 

Original Budget

Adjustments

Revised

Budget

Expenditure - Operating

$36,271k

$445k

$36,716k

Income - Operating

$38,458k

-

$38,458k

Surplus/ (Deficit)

$2,187k

$445k

$1,742k

Surplus/(Deficit) before

Capital Grants/Contributions

$100k

$445k

($345)

 

Operating Expenditure

Adjustments are recommended to the fifteen (15) operating expense items accounts as shown in AT-1 for a total of $445,252. The adjustments include an increase in legal expenses of $100,000 to cover the cost of enforcement of development consents, an increase of $30,000 in Consultant expenses re St. Leonards Traffic and Community Bus Transport Study, an increase of $16,000 in the property insurance premium plus an increase in ten (10) grant expense contra accounts totalling $291,252 reflecting unspent grant funds brought forward to 2013/2014.

Capital Expenditure

Adjustments are recommended to three (3) capital expenditure items totalling $1,320,000 including $800,000 for road works and $500,000 for community facilities at 314 Burns Bay Road and $20,000 for boat locker upgrades. All works to be funded from S94 contributions.

 

Conclusion

The following statement is made in accordance with Clause 203(2) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005.

It is my opinion that the quarterly Budget Review Statement for Lane Cove Council for the quarter ended 31 September 2013 indicates that Council's projected financial position will be satisfactory at year end 30 June 2014, having regard to the projected estimates of income and expenditure and the original budgeted income and expenditure.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the 2013 – 2014 Budget be varied as follows:-

 

 

Original Budget

Adjustments

Revised

Budget

Expenditure - Operating

$36,271k

$445k

$36,716k

Income - Operating

$38,458k

-

$38,458k

Surplus/ (Deficit)

$2,187k

$445k

$1,742k

Surplus/(Deficit) before

Capital Grants/Contributions

$100k

$445k

($345)

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Budget Review for Quarter Ended 30 September 2013

6 Pages

 

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 November 2013

New Boarding House Act 2012

 

 

Subject:          New Boarding House Act 2012    

Record No:    SU5265 - 58088/13

Division:         Environmental Services Division

Author(s):      Matthew Woodgate 

 

 

Purpose of Report

 

The purpose of this Report is to inform Council of Council’s responsibilities in regard to the Boarding Houses Act 2012, in particular, set out the obligations for community consultation required by the Division of Local Government.

 

Executive Summary

 

The Boarding Houses Act 2012 (BHA)  was passed in October 2012 as a whole of government response to concerns about the rights and safety of people living in Boarding Houses.  Part 2 of the Boarding House Act commenced on 1 January 2013 and provides for the registration of  Boarding Houses with the Department of Fair Trading by 30 June 2013. The Boarding House Act is jointly administered by the Department of Family and Community Services – Ageing Disability and Home Care and NSW Fair Trading.

 

The Boarding House Act provides Councils with new powers to gain access to boarding houses in order to conduct inspections and to ensure premises comply with Council policy, the Local Government Act 1993  and the Environmental Assessment and Planning Act 1979.

 

Those premises that have registered with the Department of Fair Trading and premises suspected of being a boarding house that have not registered are to be inspected within 12 months of registration (i.e by 30 June 2013) for matters regarding building, fire safety and public health. 

 

Prior to the above inspections taking place the Division of Local Government has requested that Councils, in consultation with local communities, adopt a Boarding House inspection program including an appropriate inspection fee. A copy of a Circular from the Division of Local Government is shown attached as AT-1.

 

Background

 

The NSW Government introduced the Boarding House Act to ensure that the operation of boarding houses, their amenity and associated risks to health and safety and well being of residents are appropriately controlled.

 

The new Boarding House Act 2012 introduces new powers/reforms including:-

 

·    Compulsory registration and inspection of registrable boarding houses;

·    Enhanced occupancy rights for residents;

·    Enhanced powers of entry for authorised service providers and advocates;

·    Increased penalties for existing offences;

·    New offences relating to registration;

·    Screening of licensees and staff of “assisted boarding houses” for criminal records; and

·    The introduction of a circumstantial evidence provision.

The Boarding House Act has split boarding houses into two categories general boarding house and assisted boarding house. An assisted boarding house is a boarding house accommodating two or more persons with additional needs eg. aged, disability or some other physical or mental impairment.  Council, under the legislation is expected to inspect both types.

 

The Department of Fair Trading has had only one boarding house registration for the Lane Cove Local Government Area, however it is suspected there may be one or more that fall under the definition of general boarding house. There is currently a boarding house under construction in Greenwich and Council has been the recipient of a Development Application for a further boarding house proposal.

 

A boarding house register is currently being developed to record required details relating to the boarding house/s. The Boarding House Act also requires Council to adopt an inspection program in consultation with our community. Currently Council has one registered Boarding House and has identified another property which may fall within the definition.

 

Discussion

 

Under the Boarding House Act initial compliance inspections must be carried out within 12 months of registration or re-registration (unless the boarding house has been inspected in the preceding 12 months) and within 12 months of a change of proprietor.

 

Staff will undertake initial compliance investigation/s after written notice has been forwarded to the boarding house. Any premises suspected of being a boarding house, under the definition of Boarding House in the Boarding House Act, will be investigated and if found to be a Boarding House will be required to be registered with the Department of Fair Trading and/or possible Penalty Infringement Notice issued.

 

Any non compliances with regard to fire safety and public health would be subject to an Intention to serve an Order under the Local Government Act, Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, Public Health Act and the Boarding Houses Act.  Penalty infringement Notices may be issued for new offences relating to the registration of boarding houses.

 

The Department of Family and Community Services – Housing NSW Boarding House Financial Assistance Program provides grants of up to $50,000.00 to help owners and operators undertake essential fire safety upgrade works.

 

The initial inspection fee for conducting the first investigative inspection would be $710.00. This fee is derived from Council’s existing Fees and Charges for 2013/2014 for Fire Safety inspections ($500.00) and Environmental Health inspections ($210.00 per hour).

 

Community Consultation

 

Statement of Intent

 

Consultation is designed to inform the Boarding House owners in the Lane Cove Local Government Area on the intended Council Boarding House Inspection program to be conducted under The Boarding House Act 2012 and the proposed inspection fee for Boarding Houses.


Method

 

Level of Participation

Inform

Consult

Form of Participation

Open

Targeted

Target Audience

Lane Cove Community

Boarding House Operations

Proposed Medium

Public / website exhibition, advertisement and eNewsletter

Letter to Boarding House Operations

Indicative Timing

 December 2013 – January 2014.

December 2013 – January 2014.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:-

 

1.   Undertake community consultation as outlined in the report to introduce a new fee for the inspection of Boarding Houses being $710 inclusive of GST.

2.   Receive a further report, following the exhibition period, to consider any submissions made in regard to the proposed fees for inspection.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Mason

Executive Manager

Environmental Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Circular to Councils from NSW Premier and Cabinett dated 14 January 2013

3 Pages

 

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 November 2013

Results of Community Consultation on the Policy on Payment of Expenses and Facilities for Councillors

 

 

Subject:          Results of Community Consultation on the Policy on Payment of Expenses and Facilities for Councillors    

Record No:    SU834 - 56402/13

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Ian Naylor 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Community consultation on the Policy on Payment of Expenses and Facilities for Councillors has now been undertaken and the purpose of this report is to advise of the results of the community consultation and recommend that the Policy be adopted with amendments.

 

Discussion

 

At the Council Meeting of 19 August 2013 Council resolved to adopt an amended Policy on Payment of Expenses and Facilities for Councillors for the purposes of community consultation. Council undertook community consultation on this policy and communicated this to the public by an advertisement in the North Shore Times, e-newsletter to over 8,900 subscribers, public exhibitions at Council’s Civic Centre and Libraries and providing information on the Policy on Council’s website. Surveys were also available at Council’s Civic Centre and Libraries and an online version was available on Council’s website. Five written responses were received and 38 online surveys were completed. The submissions received made the following suggestions for amendments to the Policy:-

 

Authorisation of Attendance for Conferences, Seminars and Training

 

Four responses expressed concern that there is no transparency where authorisation to attend conferences, seminars and training occurs outside of a Council Meeting.

 

One response suggested that international and interstate travel should not be approved outside a Council Meeting.

 

One response expressed concern that approval for overseas travel is the responsibility of the Council and there is no independent view on the matter.

 

Comment

 

Currently the policy states that the Mayor or General Manager can approve attendance when it is not practical to submit a report to Council. In practice this rarely occurs as the General Manager receives sufficient notice of conferences, seminars and training for Councillors. However, an amendment has been made to the Policy to require any approval by the Mayor or General Manager for a Councillor to attend conferences, seminars and training to be reported to the next Council Meeting. An amendment has been made to the Policy that no interstate or international travel can be approved in arrears.

 

Authorisation for Overseas Travel

 

17 responses were against overseas travel by Councillors and one response suggested that a detailed annual statement be provided about overseas travel expenses by Councillors. One response suggested domestic and overseas travel should be economy class only.

 


Comment

 

The Division of Local Government requires a detailed report to Council for any proposal for overseas travel and Council’s Annual Report to include the total cost of any overseas travel. The Policy states that payment for air travel is to be economy class.

 

Payment for Accommodation

 

Two responses suggested that reasonable costs for accommodation needs to be clarified and could include a limit for remote, rural, regional and metropolitan accommodation as well as a limit or guide for overseas costs. One response suggested deleting the words including meals as it is covered under ‘Out of Pocket Expenses’.

 

Comment

 

Setting monetary limits is difficult, as cost varies based on location and standard. Also, often accommodation is included as part of a conference at the conference venue. Where this is not the case accommodation shall be of a reasonable standard up to 4 star NRMA rating. The words “including meals” has been deleted from this section of the Policy as suggested.

 

Payment for Out of Pocket Expenses

 

Two responses expressed concerns about out-of-pocket expenses and one response suggested that no general allowances should be paid.

 

Comment

 

The provision in the Policy for out-of-pocket expenses is necessary to cover reasonable actual expenses to and from conferences, where receipts are provided. The Policy states that no general allowances are to be paid.

 

Payment for Carers Expenses

 

5 responses suggested that no reimbursement of carers expenses be provided and one response suggested that it needs to be defined more clearly.

 

Comment

 

While carers expenses may not be covered by employers of private sector organisations it is seen as best practice in local government to provide this reimbursement to encourage greater representation and diversity of potential candidates for Council.. In the last ten years there has been no requests from Lane Cove Councillors for payment of carers expenses. The Policy describes the circumstances when reimbursement is applicable and the number of hours a Councillor can apply for.

 

Reimbursement of Expenses

 

9 responses suggested that 5 years is too long to accept reimbursement of expenses and suggestions varied from 3 months to two years.

 


Comment

 

Council in considering a request for reimbursement of legal expenses resolved on 19 November 2012 to apply a 5 year limit for reimbursement of expenses. For all other expenses a shorter 6 month period is considered reasonable.

 

Typing of Official Correspondence

 

Two responses expressed concern that Councillors are supplied with portable computers but the Policy also provides for the typing of official correspondence.

 

Comment

 

With the increased use of technology in our community, the fact that Councillors are increasing using email to correspond with the community and are supplied with portable computers, there is no longer the need for Councillors to have official correspondence typed for them.  An amendment has been made to the Policy to remove typing of official correspondence as a facility for Councillors, other than the Mayor.

 

Provision for Meals and Refreshments for Mayor and Councillors

 

One response suggested that a limit should be included for Meals and refreshments associated with Council and Committee Meetings and Council receptions/functions. One response suggested that Office refreshments for the Mayor be deleted.

 

Comment

 

While the Policy has no limits on meals and refreshments, Council staff are responsible for their co-ordination and ensure meals and refreshments are moderate and funds spent are within the allocated budget. The refreshments for the Mayor’s office is proposed to be limited to $500 per annum.

 

Provision for Internet Access and Printer Cartridges

 

One response suggested a limit of $800 for computers and communications is sufficient.

 

Comment

 

The Policy provides for an annual limit of $500.

 

Conclusion

 

All NSW Councils are required each year to exhibit their Policy on Payment of Expenses and Facilities for Councillors and after reviewing any feedback from the community, adopt the Policy and provide a copy to the Division of Local Government by 30 November. Council’s Policy on Payment of Expenses and Facilities for Councillors dated 18 November 2013 has been amended in response to the feedback received from the public as shown attached as AT-1. The amendments are marked up in red in the Policy.


 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:- 

 

1.   Adopt the amended Policy on Payment of Expenses and Facilities for Councillors dated 18 November 2013 and shown attached as AT-1; and

 

2.   Send a copy of the adopted Policy to the Division of Local Government.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Draft Policy on Payment of Expenses and Facilities to Councillors

6 Pages

 

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 November 2013

Council's Annual Report 2012/13

 

 

Subject:          Council's Annual Report 2012/13    

Record No:    SU245 - 56360/13

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Ian Naylor 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The Local Government Act requires all NSW Councils to prepare an Annual Report for the previous financial year by 30 November each year. Lane Cove Council’s Draft Annual Report for 2012/13 has been produced and this report recommends that Council adopt the Draft Annual Report and send a copy to the Minister for Local Government as required by the Local Government Act.

 

Discussion

 

Council’s Draft Annual Report for 2012/2013 due to its size is attached electronically only as AT-1 and covers all of the matters listed in the Local Government Act to be addressed, in particular the financial information included in the Audited Financial Statements and the progress on achieving the projects and activities listed in the 2012-13 Delivery Program.

 

In order to maintain consistency amongst our Corporate Planning documents, the Draft Annual Report is organised into Council’s Six Strategic Planning Themes in the same way as the Lane Cove 2025, Community Strategic Plan and Delivery Program and Operational Plan. This makes the Annual Report more user-friendly to the Lane Cove community as it groups information under each planning theme rather than by Council’s internal organisation structure.

 

The Draft Annual Report contains an introduction by the Mayor and General Manager which describes the highlights for 2012/13. These highlights are reprinted below for the Councillors and community’s information:-

 

It is with great pride that we present this year’s Annual Report on behalf of the staff and Councillors of Lane Cove Council. The year 2012-13 was an extremely busy period for Council with significant progress made towards achieving the goals of our Community Strategic Plan Lane Cove 2025.

A number of projects within Council’s Major Projects Plan were advanced including the finalisation of building works at the Stokes Street Community Facilities in Lane Cove North. This is a terrific facility for the whole community with community meeting rooms and kitchen facility; a 40 place Childcare Centre and six residential units. The new childcare centre will offer 0-2 year old placements for the first time, a critical area of need identified in our Social Plan.

The Joint Regional Planning Panel approved Council’s development application for the Little Lane development with works commencing on the public car park in 2014. In addition to the 200-space public car park the development will include community space for use by local organisations as well as residential units above. Community consultation was also conducted as part of initial investigations into the Rosenthal Avenue Car Park development. The proposed plans include a 500-space underground car park, mixed retail and a new public domain above with a design competition for the development to be held next year.

Lane Cove has a strong affinity with bushland and open space. New public signage has been installed at parks and reserves across Lane Cove while many spaces have also received new picnic furniture, shelters, bbq facilities and fitness equipment. New perimeter fences were installed at Tantallon Oval where grandstand railings were also replaced and new steps were built from the field to Doug Patrick Way. In addition, Kingsford Smith Oval received a new perimeter fence while drainage improvements, returfing and releveling projects at Pottery Green, Bob Campbell Oval and Blackman Park were also completed.

Council’s bushcare team secured a number of grants, including for the upgrade of the Ventemans Reach walking track, and developed a partnership with Tribal Warriors to deliver bush regeneration in conjunction with Aboriginal youth. The 400 hard-working volunteers that form part of Council’s bush regeneration program were recognised at its annual celebration event. 

A number of local traffic studies were conducted to help improve road safety in Lane Cove including the school drop off/pick-up zones at Lane Cove West Public School and the traffic along Longueville Road to access Epping Road. Council also approached Roads and Maritime Services regarding the safety of pedestrians at the intersection of Birdwood Avenue and Longueville Road and conducted a number of public safety workshops including free child-restraint checking, cycling workshops, driveway safety around children and the Stepping Out pedestrian safety for elderly residents.

Council also initiated a number of public communication campaigns. Changes to NSW legislation on smoking in public places led to a new public information and signage strategy. Let’s Clear The Air materials were made available to local businesses and promoted heavily in Council newsletters. New signs were placed in high pedestrian areas while Council’s Environmental Health Team address known problem-areas. The health of the Lane Cove community was also a key focus of the annual Walk Around the World program which saw local residents register to receive pedometers and record the number of steps they took throughout March.

With such significant reforms scheduled for NSW’s Planning System, Council initiated direct communication with residents to keep them informed. A special edition newsletter was sent out to all ratepayers explaining the key changes that will affect them followed by public meetings to assist in educating residents about the proposals detailed in the NSW White Paper. Council has maintained a strong voice in the consultation process representing Lane Cove at meetings with the Minister for Planning & Infrastructure and providing comprehensive submissions to both the Green and White Papers. Council will continue to keep residents informed of the changes taking place, set to be the biggest change to planning legislation in 30 years.

Council is keen to ensure the quality of amenity in Lane Cove with streetscape upgrades taking place at Greenwich Shops, Wardrop Street and Figtree Shops. The benefits of the Stage 1 Plaza upgrade have been realised with the artificial green and bandstand upgrade providing an enjoyable mixed-use space for the public to enjoy. Plans have also advanced for the Stage 2 Plaza Upgrade which will take place in 2014.

The community continues to enjoy use of high-class facilities such as Lane Cove Library and Gallery Lane Cove with the Library again having the highest borrowing rate per capita in New South Wales. Both venues host events as part of Council’s annual cultural programs including the Cameraygal Festival, a celebration which this year involved up to 30 community organisations.

The popularity of the Lunar New Year Festival continues to grow with 400 people enjoying a special cultural show in the Plaza in February to mark Year of the Snake. Council also expanded its Australia Day Citizenship Ceremony to include a celebration with new citizens in Lane Cove Plaza. Local residents received an extra voice through the establishment of the La Voce Community Choir while the Different Degrees Theatre Ensemble received well-earned recognition with the LG NSW Arts and Culture Award for accessibility in the Arts.

Lane Cove is a well-connected, local community and each year we enjoy the opportunity to recognise the special efforts of residents and businesses through the Lane Cove Citizenship Awards. The Financial Assistance Grants program also recognizes the hard work of local organisations that each year rely on over $400,000 worth of funding provided by Council. Free workshops for community organisations, board members and volunteers also provide additional support to these very important members of our local community.

This is just a snapshot of the large number of important initiatives delivered by the 200 staff employed by Council in conjunction with Councillors and members of the community. On behalf of Lane Cove we thank all those who have made valuable contributions to these achievements and continued to embrace our wonderful village lifestyle. We look forward to continuing this momentum into the coming year”.

Conclusion

 

The Draft Annual Report has been prepared to meet the requirements of the Local Government Act. Upon adoption of the Report, a copy will be forwarded to the Minister as required by the Act and will be publicly accessible via Council’s website, http://www.lanecove.nsw.gov.au.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:-

 

1.  Council adopt the Draft Annual Report at AT-1 -for 2012/2013;

 

2.  The adopted Annual Report be forwarded to the Minister for Local Government; and

 

3.  The Annual Report be published on Council’s website.

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Draft Annual Report 2012-13 (14MB)

159 Pages

Circulated Separately

 

  


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 November 2013

District Bushfire Risk Management Plan

 

 

Subject:          District Bushfire Risk Management Plan    

Record No:    SU4906 - 57311/13

Division:         Open Space and Urban Services Division

Author(s):      Kerry Heatley 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The purpose of this report is to advise on the implementation of the 2008/9 District Bushfire Risk Management Plan and the updated Risk Management Plan. The report recommends that this information be received and noted.

 

Background

 

At the Council Meeting of 21 October 2013 Council officers were requested to provide a report providing information on:-

 

1.   The implementation of the 2008/9 District Bushfire Risk Management Plan; and

 

2.   The updated Risk Management Plan.

 

The Bushfire Risk Management Plan for Lane Cove, Hunters Hill, Ryde and Willoughby Councils was prepared by the Bushfire Management Committee in 2008/09. The aim of the plan was to identify the assets at risk and prioritise hazard reduction works over the following 5 years.   Hazard reduction works include hazard reduction burns as well as manual hazard reduction works undertaken as part of the Bush Regeneration Program.

 

The Bushfire Management Committee also produced the Bushfire Fuel Management Program (2008) to identify priority areas for hazard reduction burns.  

 

 

Discussion.

 

The Bushfire Risk Management Plan (BFRMP) was prepared in 2008/09 by the District Bushfire Management Committee (BFMC), which has representatives from Lane Cove, Hunters Hill, Ryde and Willoughby Councils, Lane Cove National Park and NSW Fire and Rescue. The draft plan was placed on public exhibition for 6 weeks in July and August 2009.

 

This plan identifies assets at risk, ranked in priority across the district. It has been based on site specific information including factors such as slope, aspect, fire history, previous hazard reduction works, heritage sites and threatened species. This plan forms the basis of how the councils will treat these risks over a 5 year period and is used to develop the bushfire hazard reduction works that are to be carried out in the local bushland reserves.

 

The District Bushfire Management Committee meets regularly to plan and prioritise hazard reduction burns in the district. A Bushfire Fuel Management Program was prepared in 2008 to accompany the Plan, and this has formed the basis for the hazard reduction works undertaken by NSW Fire and Rescue.

 

The Bushfire Fuel Management Program includes recommendations for hazard reduction burns in the Lane Cove LGA. The three sites identified are Osborne Park, Batten Reserve and Epping Road Plateau.

 

A hazard reduction burn was carried out in September 2012 in bushland at Osborne Park.    Preparation works have been completed to undertake a burn at Batten Reserve behind Pinaroo Place, however this work has been delayed by NSW Fire and Rescue on a number of occasions.    NSW Fire and Rescue were planning to burn the area this spring, but have been unable to complete the burn due to the very high fire danger that NSW has experienced.    Approximately half of the proposed burn area was recently burnt in an unplanned burn, possibly due to arson. 

 

After the Batten Reserve burn is completed there are plans to undertake the Epping Road Plateau hazard reduction burn. This burn will be complicated due to the need for lane closures on Epping Road while the burn is in progress.

 

The 2008/9 Bushfire Risk Management Plan for Hunters Hill, Ryde, Lane Cove and Willoughby Councils has not been updated.

 

The Rural Fire Service identifies the need for Asset Protection Zones (APZ’s) in Lane Cove bushland reserves on a case by case basis. The RFS advises Council of requirements for individual APZ’s and Council staff undertake the necessary on-ground works, including long term maintenance works. Hazard reduction clearing in Council’s bushland reserves is carried out by Council staff and contractors as required as part of the ongoing bush regeneration program.  

 

Conclusion

 

Council continues to work with NSW Fire and Rescue to plan and prioritise hazard reduction works in the bushland reserves, according to the priorities set out in the District Bushfire Risk Management Plan prepared in 2008/09.

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receive and note the report.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wayne Rylands

Executive Manager

Open Space and Urban Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

There are no supporting documents for this report.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 November 2013

1st Quarter Review of the 2013-2014 Delivery Program & Operational Plan

 

 

Subject:          1st Quarter Review of the 2013-2014 Delivery Program & Operational Plan    

Record No:    SU238 - 56059/13

Division:         Corporate Services Division

Author(s):      Ian Naylor 

 

 

Executive Summary

This report outlines the 1st Quarter progress towards achieving the projects listed in the adopted 2013-2014 Delivery Program and Operational Plan.  It is recommended that the report be received and noted.

Discussion

Council’s adopted 2013-2014 Delivery Program and Operational Plan details the projects proposed to be undertaken during the financial year in order to meet the goals and objectives of Lane Cove 2025 - Community Strategic Plan. Council reports quarterly on the progress towards completing the projects and achieving the targets for the adopted performance measurements. The 1st Quarter Review of the 2013-2014 Delivery Program and Operational Plan is shown attached as AT-1

 

The projects in the Quarterly Review are listed by the responsible Council Division and where the project has a completion date the ‘Action Status’ column graphically demonstrates the progress towards completion. The Review also includes a comment on the status of each project.

 

Progress towards completing projects is on track with approximately 16% of projects completed.  A breakdown of this progress by Division is provided below:-

·                                                               Corporate Services      14%

·                                                               Environmental Services          40%

·                                                               Human Services          7%

·                                                               Open Space and Urban Services       18%

 

The Quarterly Review also provides a report on progress towards achieving the targets set for performance measurement for each Division of Council. A cumulative figure for performance measurement is shown so that performance can be tracked each quarter towards achieving the required target.

The highlights of the projects completed for the 1st quarter include:-

·      Tender for External Auditors completed (July).

·      Construction of Meeting House completed (July).

·      Conducted Mock Court Case for school students on the topic of sustainability (July).

·      Screen on the Green held for State of Origin. (July).

·      Batten Reserve and Ventemans Reach bush tracks upgraded. (July).

·      Design principles developed through the community consultation process for the public domain component of the Rosenthal development endorsed by Council (August).

·      Review of General Manager and Staff Delegations completed (August).

·      First Meeting of Aboriginal Advisory Committee held (August).

·      Successful in obtaining funding for the installation of heat pumps and solar panels at 15 Council facilities and heating ventilation and air conditioning system to be installed at the Civic Centre (August).

·      Cheque presentation for Financial Assistance Grants program held with $434,308 allocate to 34 community groups (August).

·      Launch of Cameraygal Festival (August).

·      Assisted Lane Cove Concert Band in publishing a book on its first 50 years (August).

·      Bag Share Program commenced (September).

·      Draft DCP Amendment for Carparking adopted to reduce number of spaces required by restaurants (September).

·    Negotiated with Developers for inclusion of 17 Affordable housing units in 150 Epping Rd development. (September).

·    Seminar held on Governance for Community Organisations (September).

·    Designs for Upgrade of the Plaza placed on public exhibition (September).

·    Designs for traffic improvements at intersection of Birdwood Avenue and Little Street placed on public exhibition (September).

·    Stage 1 of Upgrade to Lane Cove West Shops completed (September).

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the 1st Quarter Review of the 2013-2014 Delivery Program and Operational Plan be received and noted.

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Dalli

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

Corporate Services Division

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

1st Quarter Review of 2013 - 2014 Operational Plan

59 Pages

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting 18 November 2013

Council Snapshot

 

 

Subject:          Council Snapshot     

Record No:    SU220 - 57585/13

Division:         General Managers Unit

Author(s):      Millie Stephen 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Attached for the information of Councillors is a review of Council’s recent activities, entitled Council Snapshot.  This report provides a summary of the operations of each Division.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receive and note the report.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Wrightson

General Manager

General Managers Unit

 

 

ATTACHMENTS:

AT‑1 View

Council Snapshot for October 2013

61 Pages